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Life Sciences - Environment - 25.01.2019
'Noisy' gene atlas to help explain how plants survive environmental change
’Noisy’ gene atlas to help explain how plants survive environmental change
As parents of identical twins will tell you, they are never actually identical, even though they have the same genes. This is also true in the plant world. Now, new research by the University of Cambridge is helping to explain why 'twin' plants, with identical genes, grown in identical environments continue to display unique characteristics all of their own.

Environment - 21.01.2019
Warning for world’s groundwater reserves
Future generations could be faced with an environmental ‘time bomb' if climate change is to have a significant effect on the world's essential groundwater reserves. This is according to a researcher from Cardiff University and a team of international collaborators who have for the first time provided a global insight in to what will happen should our groundwater systems start to see changes in their replenishment.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 17.01.2019
Deputy High Commissioner visits Birmingham research experts
University of Birmingham experts have worked with one of China's biggest railway rolling stock companies to develop the world's first shipping container using materials that store and release cold energy. Using phase change material (PCM), Birmingham scientists and their counterparts at CRRC Shijiazhuang have developed a ‘refrigerated' truck-to-train container that is easier and more efficient to operate than conventional equipment.

Transport - Environment - 17.01.2019
Advanced modelling techniques could improve how cities deal with floods
Advanced modelling techniques could improve how cities deal with floods
A city's ability to safeguard the public in the event of a flood could be greatly improved by using scientific practices for emergency plans and involving decision-makers in the process. This is the key finding from a new study that is the first to look at the impact of flood preparedness from multiple perspectives, including pedestrian safety, accessibility to hospitals and fire stations, and the hazards posed by travel routes and parked vehicles.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2019
Premier League footballers participate in new ground-breaking concussion study
Plant scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have unravelled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and ‘remember' changes in their environment. The research, published , reveals potential new targets that could support the development of new plant varieties, including cereals and vegetables, that can adapt to different environmental conditions.

Environment - 15.01.2019
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research, involving researchers from Cardiff University, has revealed that gardens and allotments are good for pollinators, and lavender and borage are important garden plants that pollinators use as food sources.

Environment - 14.01.2019
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research, carried out by scientists at the Universities of Bristol, Edinburgh, Leeds and Reading in collaboration with Cardiff University and the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), has revealed that gardens and allotments are good for pollinators, and lavender and borage are important garden plants that pollinators use as food sources.

Environment - 09.01.2019
Is using drones to tackle climate change
Is using drones to tackle climate change
A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests. The findings of the study - ‘ A view from above: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles provide a new tool for assessing liana infestation in tropical forest canopies' , have been published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Environment - 08.01.2019
A century and half of reconstructed ocean warming offers clues for the future
Due to a scarcity of data, most global estimates of ocean warming start only in the 1950s. However, a team of scientists at the University of Oxford has now succeeded in reconstructing ocean temperature change from 1871 to 2017. Over the past century, increased greenhouse gas emissions have given rise to an excess of energy in the Earth system.

Environment - 04.01.2019
Upstart sparrows and chasing waterfalls: News from the College
From textbook-defying sparrows to powerful waterfalls, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Textbook-defying sparrows A seemingly well-established hypothesis in biology may need a rethink. The ‘status signalling hypothesis' says that certain physical attributes of animals reflect their dominance in the group, regardless of age, body size and body condition.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.01.2019
Window into previously unseen part of glacial environment
The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane, according to a new study showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought. An international team, including researchers from Cardiff University, camped for three months next to the Greenland Ice Sheet, sampling the meltwater that runs off a large catchment (> 600 km2) of the Ice Sheet during the summer months.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.01.2019
Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere
Melting ice sheets release tons of methane into the atmosphere
The Greenland Ice Sheet emits tons of methane according to a new study, showing that subglacial biological activity impacts the atmosphere far more than previously thought. An international team of researchers led by the University of Bristol camped for three months next to the Greenland Ice Sheet, sampling the meltwater that runs off a large catchment (> 600 km2) of the Ice Sheet during the summer months.

Environment - 02.01.2019
Protecting proboscis monkeys from deforestation
A 10 year study of proboscis monkeys in Borneo has revealed that forest conversion to oil palm plantations is having a significant impact on the species. Nearly half of all primate species are threatened with extinction, with habitat destruction acting as the key driving force. New research studied proboscis monkeys from 2004 to 2014, finding that the protection of swamp forests is vital for their survival.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 01.01.2019
Martian drill set for Antarctic climate mission
A drill originally developed to break through Martian rocks is set to be deployed to Antarctica on a mission which could help us understand the history of Earth's changing climate. A team of University of Glasgow engineers are heading to a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) research station named Skytrain Ice Rise on Thursday 3 January with a sophisticated drill they originally developed for use on future unmanned Martian rover missions.

Health - Environment - 01.01.2019
From cycling to Eurovision - how Imperial can help your New Year’s resolutions
We take a look back at Imperial research from the past year to give you some inspiration for your 2019 new year's resolutions. Reduce alcohol intake Thinking of doing dry January? According to Imperial research , this may be something you want to keep up throughout the year… Earlier this year, Imperial researchers were among a team of international scientists to suggest there is no safe level of alcohol and instead the health risks outweigh any possible benefits.

Environment - 28.12.2018
7 times Imperial made you double-take in 2018
Some surprise headlines need a second look, and quirky studies can often have serious impact on our lives. From holographic teachers to turtles that breathe through their genitals, here are a handful of the stories that made readers do a double-take in 2018. Napoleon dynamite In August, research from Dr Matthew Genge revealed that electrically charged volcanic ash short-circuited Earth's atmosphere in 1815 causing global poor weather - and Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Waterloo.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.12.2018
Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants
Plant scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Nottingham have unravelled a mechanism that enables flowering plants to sense and ‘remember' changes in their environment. The research, published , reveals potential new targets that could support the development of new plant varieties, including cereals and vegetables, that can adapt to different environmental conditions.

Environment - 21.12.2018
Forget-me-not: Scientists pinpoint memory mechanism in plants
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have been awarded 1.6M by the Natural Environment Research Council to lead a project investigating shipping emissions in the Arctic and North Atlantic atmosphere. Called SEANA (Shipping Emissions in the Arctic and North Atlantic Atmosphere), the project also includes partners from the University of Exeter, British Antarctic Survey and Cranfield University.

Environment - 21.12.2018
Divining Roots: revealing how plants branch out to access water
New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water. The discovery could enable crops to be bred which are more adaptive to changes in climate conditions, such as water scarcity, and help ensure food security in the future.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.12.2018
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Finds chloroform emissions, on the rise in East Asia, could delay ozone recovery by up to eight years
Earlier this year, the United Nations announced that the ozone layer, which shields the Earth from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation, and which was severely depleted by decades of human-derived, ozone-destroying chemicals, is on the road to recovery. The dramatic turnaround is a direct result of regulations set by the 1987 Montreal Protocol, a global treaty under which nearly every country in the world, including the United States, successfully acted to ban the production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the main agents of ozone depletion.

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