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Results 61 - 80 of 137.


Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 30.07.2015
Bionic eye technology could more rapidly spot assembly line faults
Bionic eye technology could more rapidly spot assembly line faults
Scientists are developing a 'bionic eye' that could be used by manufacturers to improve monitoring of industrial assembly lines. At the back of the human eye is a specialised layer of cells called the retina, which captures light information. This information is then converted into electrical signals and sent via the optic nerve to the brain, where a visual image is produced.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 27.07.2015
Close-up film shows for the first time how ants use ’combs’ and ’brushes’ to keep their antennae clean
Using unique mechanical experiments and close-up video, Cambridge researchers have shown how ants use microscopic 'combs' and 'brushes' to keep their antennae clean, which could have applications for developing cleaners for nanotechnology. Insects have developed ingenious ways of cleaning very small, sensitive structures, which could have fascinating applications for nanotechnology - where contamination of small things is a big problem Alexander Hackmann For an insect, grooming is a serious business.

Physics - Electroengineering - 02.07.2015
To conduct, or to insulate? That is the question
Researchers have identified a material that behaves as a conductor and an insulator at the same time, challenging current understanding of how materials behave, and pointing to a new type of insulating state. The discovery of dual metal-insulator behaviour in a single material has the potential to overturn decades of conventional wisdom regarding the fundamental dichotomy between metals and insulators Suchitra Sebastian A new study has discovered mysterious behaviour of a material that acts like an insulator in certain measurements, but simultaneously acts like a conductor in others.

Electroengineering - Life Sciences - 15.06.2015
Squid inspires camouflaging smart materials
Researchers from the University of Bristol have shown it is possible to create artificial skin that can be transformed at the flick of a switch to mimic one of nature's masters of camouflage, the squid. The research team, from the University's Department of Engineering Mathematics, have designed a smart materials system, inspired by biological chromatophores, which creates patterns that change and morph over time and mimic biological patterning.

Electroengineering - Health - 14.05.2015
New findings support University bid for bandages to enter the electronic age
New findings support University bid for bandages to enter the electronic age
The most detailed study to date showing how electrical stimulation accelerates wound healing has been carried out in 40 volunteers by University of Manchester scientists. Skin wounds that are slow to heal are a clinical challenge to physicians all over the world. Every year, the NHS alone spends 1 billion on treating chronic wounds such as lower limb venous and diabetic ulcers.

Electroengineering - Physics - 13.05.2015
Cardiff’s Lightning Lab stars on Canada’s top science show
A Cardiff University scientist will star on one of Canada's top science TV shows to explain what happens when inflight aircraft are struck by lightning. Dr Daniel Mitchard, a senior researcher at the Morgan-Botti Lightning Laboratory, met with Jennifer Gardy, one of the hosts of the long-running CBC science show 'The Nature of Things' during two days of filming.

Electroengineering - Physics - 08.04.2015
New understanding of electromagnetism could enable ’antennas on a chip’
New understanding of the nature of electromagnetism could lead to antennas small enough to fit on computer chips - the 'last frontier' of semiconductor design - and could help identify the points where theories of classical electromagnetism and quantum mechanics overlap. This is the missing piece of the puzzle of electromagnetic theory Gehan Amaratunga A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have unravelled one of the mysteries of electromagnetism, which could enable the design of antennas small enough to be integrated into an electronic chip.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 23.03.2015
How do humans interact with a changing visual world?
A new £1.4 million research project led by the University of Bristol will use engineering and science in the design of radically new approaches and solutions to vision-based technology. Researchers from the University's Bristol Vision Institute (BVI) have been awarded an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Platform Grant for their project ‘ Vision for the future '.

Physics - Electroengineering - 16.03.2015
Scientists move closer to "two for one deal" on solar cell efficiency
The causes of a hitherto mysterious process that could enhance the power of solar cells have been explained in a new study. If we want to implement this in a solar cell, we need to understand more about why and how singlet exciton fission occurs in the first place. Andrew Musser The underlying mechanism behind an enigmatic process called "singlet exciton fission", which could enable the development of significantly more powerful solar cells, has been identified by scientists in a new study.

Electroengineering - 03.02.2015
New technique doubles the distance of optical fibre communications
New technique doubles the distance of optical fibre communications
A new way to process fibre optic signals has been demonstrated by UCL researchers, which could double the distance at which data travels error-free through transoceanic sub-marine cables. The new method has the potential to reduce the costs of long-distance optical fibre as signals wouldn't need to be electronically boosted on their journey, which is important when the cables are buried underground or at the bottom of the ocean.

Electroengineering - Physics - 02.02.2015
Graphene displays clear prospects for flexible electronics
Semi-transparent, flexible electronics are no longer just science-fiction thanks to graphene's unique properties, University of Sheffield researchers have found. Published in the scientific , University of Sheffield and University of Manchester researchers show that new 2D 'designer materials' can be produced to create flexible, see-through and more efficient electronic devices.

Electroengineering - Physics - 02.02.2015
Graphene displays clear prospects for flexible electronics
Graphene displays clear prospects for flexible electronics
Semi-transparent, flexible electronics are no longer just science-fiction thanks to graphene's unique properties, University of Manchester researchers have found. Published in the scientific , University of Manchester and University of Sheffield researchers show that new 2D 'designer materials' can be produced to create flexible, see-through and more efficient electronic devices.

Health - Electroengineering - 29.01.2015
Virtual gallery showcases the silicon chips behind a revolution in healthcare
Virtual gallery showcases the silicon chips behind a revolution in healthcare
A new Instagram series will show off the surprising beauty of the silicon chips being developed by researchers at Imperial to improve health. A silicon chip that can form a bridge to connect severed nerves together in people with spinal injuries and a chip that could help patients with locked in syndrome to communicate with the outside world are some of the prototypes that will be showcased in the Instagram campaign, which starts tomorrow (30 January).

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 08.12.2014
Chemists create ’artificial chemical evolution’ for the first time
Scientists have taken an important step towards the possibility of creating synthetic life with the development of a form of artificial evolution in a simple chemistry set without DNA. A team from the University of Glasgow's School of Chemistry report in a new paper today (Monday 8 December) on how they have managed to create an evolving chemical system for the first time.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 01.12.2014
New research could transform high speed optical networks
Press release issued: 1 December 2014 There is an ever growing demand for high speed internet communication systems. New research has shown optical switching technology built on nanoantenna reflectarrays and tunable materials could transform high speed optical networks. The study by Dr Maciej Klemm and Professor Martin Cryan from the University of Bristol's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering is published in the journal, Optics Express .

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.09.2014
Simulation method identifies materials for better batteries
Researchers from the University of Cambridge have devised a new simulation technique which reliably predicts the structure and behaviour of different materials, in order to accelerate the development of next-generation batteries for a wide range of applications.

Electroengineering - Physics - 08.09.2014
Layered graphene sandwich for next generation electronics
08 Sep 2014 Sandwiching layers of graphene with white graphene could produce designer materials capable of creating high-frequency electronic devices, University of Manchester scientists have found. Writing , the researchers have demonstrated how combining the two-dimensional materials in a stack could create perfect crystals capable of being used in next generation transistors.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 19.08.2014
Secrets of how worms wriggle uncovered
An engineer at the University of Liverpool has found how worms move around, despite not having a brain to communicate with the body. Dr Paolo Paoletti , alongside his colleague at Harvard, Professor L Mahadevan, has developed a mathematical model for earthworms and insect larvae which challenges the traditional view of how these soft bodied animals get around.

Electroengineering - Physics - 11.08.2014
Pairing old technologies with new for next generation electronic devices
Pairing old technologies with new for next generation electronic devices
UCL scientists have discovered a new method to efficiently generate and control currents based on the magnetic nature of electrons in semi-conducting materials, offering a radical way to develop a new generation of electronic devices. One promising approach to developing new technologies is to exploit the electron's tiny magnetic moment, or 'spin'.

Electroengineering - 04.08.2014
A little video game-playing linked with better-adjusted children
Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-83664169/stock-photo-cologne-august-psvita-or-playstation-vita-at-gamescom-the-most-important-european-video.html'src=H0zUTI9ClkDqiDqzwCtZYw-1-42 A new study suggests video game-playing for less than an hour a day is linked with better-adjusted children and teenagers.

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