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Results 61 - 80 of 421.


Astronomy / Space - 24.05.2024
Intriguing Earth-sized planet discovered 40 light years away
Intriguing Earth-sized planet discovered 40 light years away
Two international teams of astronomers, including one co-led by a PhD candidate based at UCL and the University of Edinburgh, have discovered a planet only 40 light years away whose size is between that of Earth and Venus. The researchers used observations by NASA's TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite).

Environment - 24.05.2024
Ambitious targets are needed to end ocean plastic pollution by 2100
Research suggests that plastic pollution must be reduced by at least 5% every year to make progress towards UN targets by the end of the century. The study, a collaboration between researchers at Imperial College London and GNS Science, suggests that reducing plastic pollution by 5% per year would stabilize the level of microplastics - plastics less than 5 mm in length - in the surface oceans.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.05.2024
Sponge-like material that could boost nuclear energy and hydrogen tech
Sponge-like material that could boost nuclear energy and hydrogen tech
Chemists have developed breakthrough porous materials that could be used for the future of energy, including in the nuclear industry or for storing hydrogen. The discovery was made by experts from the universities of Southampton and Liverpool. The new materials, which have sponge-like holes, were developed using powerful computer simulations.

History / Archeology - Environment - 23.05.2024
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
In The Conversation, Dr Ceri Shipton (UCL Institute of Archaeology) explores his new research that has found a large wave of migration reached the island of Timor not long after 50,000 years ago. Humans arrived in Australia at least  65,000 years ago , according to archaeological evidence. These pioneers were part of an early wave of people travelling eastwards from Africa, through Eurasia, and ultimately into Australia and New Guinea.

Environment - 22.05.2024
Researchers propose use of electrical blackouts to determine impact of artificial light on wildlife
Researchers propose use of electrical blackouts to determine impact of artificial light on wildlife
New research proposes the use of electrical blackouts, such as those experienced during loadshedding in South Africa, to enhance our understanding of how artificial light in urban areas may be affecting wildlife behaviours. Artificial light at night, known as ALAN among urban ecologists, has become ubiquitous worldwide, with a notable increase in recent years.

Career - Media - 22.05.2024
Nearly a third of Welsh journalists are considering leaving the sector
A higher proportion of Welsh journalists are considering leaving the profession compared to those from across the UK, new analysis from Cardiff University shows. The study by researchers at the Centre for the Creative Economy, reveals the scale of challenge ahead for the survival and integrity of public interest journalism in Wales.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 22.05.2024
Excavation indicates a major ancient migration to Timor Island
Excavation indicates a major ancient migration to Timor Island
New archaeological evidence indicates that humans first reached the island of Timor in large numbers, challenging scientists' understanding of how ancient people migrated from Southeast Asia to Australia, according to a new study led by a UCL researcher. The study, published in Nature Communications , dated and analysed ancient sediment, artefacts, and animal remains discovered in a large rock overhang in Laili, located in north-central Timor-Leste (East Timor).

Psychology - Social Sciences - 22.05.2024
One in two children with ADHD experience emotional problems
Cambridge scientists have shown that problems regulating emotions - which can manifest as depression, anxiety and explosive outbursts - may be a core symptom of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

History / Archeology - 22.05.2024
3,500-year-old Mycenaean armour was suitable for extended battle - study
3,500-year-old Mycenaean armour was suitable for extended battle - study
A 3,500-year-old suit of Mycenaean armour may have been used in battle - and not just for ceremonial purposes as previously thought - new research reveals. Researchers worked with a group of Greek military volunteers who wore a replica of the Dendra armour during extended simulations of the rigours of battle.

Health - 22.05.2024
Epidurals associated with 35% reduction in severe maternal health complications in childbirth
Receiving an epidural during labour is associated with a significant reduction in severe maternal morbidity (serious health problems during childbirth or the six weeks following birth), according to new research that looked at data from more than half a million mothers in the UK. The findings suggest that improving access to epidurals during labour, alongside better information on the procedure for mothers, may help to decrease the risk of serious adverse health outcomes occurring from the time of birth to six weeks postnatally in the UK.

Physics - Innovation - 20.05.2024
Scientists make quantum breakthrough in 2D materials
Scientists have discovered that a 'single atomic defect' in a layered 2D material can hold onto quantum information for microseconds at room temperature, underscoring the potential of 2D materials in advancing quantum technologies. The defect, found by researchers from the Universities of Manchester and Cambridge using a thin material called Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) , demonstrates spin coherence-a property where an electronic spin can retain quantum information- under ambient conditions.

Pharmacology - 20.05.2024
How beeswax could help families in warzones
Beeswax and local herbs could be crucial in helping families living in conflict zones store food, according to scientists from Cardiff University and Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute of National Technical University, Ukraine.

Transport - 20.05.2024
Underwater signals generated by open sea airplane crashes could be key to detecting final resting place of MH370
Signals captured on underwater microphones could be key to locating airplanes such as MH370 when they crash into the ocean, Cardiff University research shows. More than 100 hours of data, captured by devices known as hydrophones after 10 historical aircraft accidents and one submarine disappearance, were analysed for the study.

Life Sciences - Environment - 17.05.2024
Earth's earliest sea creatures drove evolution by stirring the water
Earth’s earliest sea creatures drove evolution by stirring the water
3D reconstructions suggest that simple marine animals living over 560 million years ago drove the emergence of more complex life by mixing the seawater around them It's exciting to learn that the very first animals from 580 million years ago had a significant impact on their environment, despite not being able to move or swim.

History / Archeology - 17.05.2024
Pagan-Christian trade networks supplied horses from overseas for the last horse sacrifices in Europe
Pagan-Christian trade networks supplied horses from overseas for the last horse sacrifices in Europe
Horses crossed the Baltic Sea in ships during the Late Viking Age and were sacrificed for funeral rituals, according to research from Cardiff University. Published in the journal Science Advances , studies on the remains of horses found at ancient burial sites in Russia and Lithuania show that they were brought overseas from Scandinavia utilising expansive trade networks connecting the Viking world with the Byzantine and Arab Empires.

Astronomy / Space - 16.05.2024
Webb detects most distant black hole merger to date
An international team of astronomers, led by the University of Cambridge, has used the James Webb Space Telescope to find evidence for an ongoing merger of two galaxies and their massive black holes when the Universe was only 740 million years old. This marks the most distant detection of a black hole merger ever obtained and the first time that this phenomenon has been detected so early in the Universe.

Health - Psychology - 16.05.2024
Study identifies 'hot-spots' of high rates of depression linked to deprivation
Study identifies ’hot-spots’ of high rates of depression linked to deprivation
Research led by the University of Southampton shows particular regions of England have suffered over a decade of increasing mental health inequalities, but finds the picture varies greatly across different parts of the country. The study, in collaboration with the University of Liverpool, examines the relationship between socioeconomic conditions within local areas and the mental health of people who live there.

Computer Science - Innovation - 16.05.2024
Intelligent surfaces research breakthrough could solve indoor positioning problem
A new advance in a developing form of wireless communications could help precisely pinpoint the locations of people and objects indoors, researchers say. Engineers from University of Glasgow and colleagues from the UK and Australia are behind the research breakthrough. Their work could have a wide range of future applications, from helping emergency services quickly find people trapped in smoke-filled buildings to offering device-assisted navigation through public spaces for blind and partially-sighted people.

Pharmacology - 16.05.2024
Scientists brew killer bee beer
A new beer is being brewed by microbiologists, using extracts found in killer bees from Namibia. Scientists from Cardiff University have used brewer's yeast that resides in the gut microbiome of killer honeybees in Namibia and applied it to develop a unique craft beer. The Cardiff microbiologists originally visited Namibia as part of a project that unites Cardiff University and the University of Namibia for sustainable environmental development, when the scientists became interested in the Africanised honey bee - also known as the killer bee.

Health - 16.05.2024
Tobacco corporation attempts to gain public trust in its science are having success
Tobacco corporation attempts to gain public trust in its science are having success
Tobacco corporation attempts to gain public trust in its science are having success - new research Philip Morris International gains trust in industry-funded science by posing as a generous supporter and concealing its involvement through third parties A new study suggests that the tobacco company Philip Morris International (PMI), is successfully increasing public trust in industry-funded science by portraying itself as a generous supporter of scientific research while simultaneously concealing its involvement through third parties.