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Sport - Economics / Business - 20.03.2018
Why it doesn’t pay to be just nice – you also need to be intelligent
Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Minnesota and Heidelberg devised a series of games to find out which factors lead to cooperative behaviour when people interact in social and workplace situations. Their findings, due to be published in the Journal of Political Economy , showed that people with a higher IQ displayed 'significantly higher' levels of cooperation, which in turn led to them earning more money as part of the game.

Economics / Business - 15.03.2018
England has one of the lowest levels of financial literacy
One-in-three adults in England and Northern Ireland (NI) cannot work out the correct change from a shopping trip, according to new research from UCL and University of Cambridge. The findings show that adults in England and NI perform worse on everyday financial numeracy tasks than adults in many other developed countries - even when using a calculator.

Health - Economics / Business - 13.03.2018
Academics urge rethink on 28-day prescriptions for people with long-term conditions
The widely adopted practice of issuing 28-day rather than longer duration prescriptions for people with long-term conditions lacks a robust evidence base and should be reconsidered, according to a study published in the British Journal of General Practice today [Tuesday 13 March]. Related research shows that considerable savings could be made by the NHS switching to longer prescriptions.

Economics / Business - 22.01.2018
Human smugglers operate as ’independent traders’, study finds
First study to model the organisation behind trade in illegal border crossings shows no "Mafia-like" monopoly of routes from Africa into Europe via Mediterranean. Instead, myriad independent smugglers compete in open markets that have emerged at every stage of the journey. This is a far cry from how Mafia-like organisations operate Paolo Campana Latest research shows a lack of overarching coordination or the involvement of any "kingpin"-style monopolies in the criminal operations illegally transporting people from the Horn of Africa into Northern Europe via Libya.

Economics / Business - Innovation - 19.01.2018
Gut instinct trumps evidence at the polls
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.

Economics / Business - Innovation - 18.01.2018
How ’gut instinct’ trumps ’evidence’ when voters go to the polls
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.

Economics / Business - Innovation - 01.01.2018
’Gut instinct’ trumps ’evidence’ when voting
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.

History / Archeology - Economics / Business - 18.12.2017
Calf’s foot jelly and a tankard of ale? Welcome to the 18th century Starbucks
Researchers have published details of the largest collection of artefacts from an early English coffeehouse ever discovered. Described as an 18th century equivalent of Starbucks, the finds nonetheless suggest that it may have been less like a café, and more like an inn. Coffee houses were important social centres during the 18th century.

Economics / Business - 17.11.2017
Grade inflation adds thousands to the cost of a family home
Grade inflation at English primary schools can increase the price of surrounding houses by up to £7,000, according to early research from economists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The study finds that as parents are drawn to areas with what appear to be higher school scores, the demand for housing escalates and poorer residents are driven out.

Economics / Business - Mathematics - 10.11.2017
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows An economy based on zero growth could be more stable - experiencing fewer crashes - and bring higher wages, suggests a new University of Sussex study. Running counter to dominant economic thinking, the new research shows that economies can be stable with or without growth and are in fact likely to be less volatile if we stop chasing ever-increasing GDP.

Economics / Business - Health - 02.11.2017
Child neglect linked to parental unemployment
The number of reported cases of child neglect in the United States of America increased as a result of the spike in unemployment following the financial crisis of 2007-08, according to new Oxford University research.  Defined as the physical, mental, sexual or emotional abuse or neglect of a person under the age of 18, child maltreatment is a prolific problem in American society, with about 700,000 cases reported in 2015 alone.

Environment - Economics / Business - 25.10.2017
Global biodiversity conservation does save species, but could be done smarter
New analysis reveals that billions of dollars spent on habitat and species conservation have resulted in substantial reductions in biodiversity loss. Government spending on conservation efforts, such as management of national parks, has been patchy across the world, in part due to a lack of solid evidence of success.

Economics / Business - 28.09.2017
Diversification benefits of commodities
Investment portfolios that include commodities deliver a six per cent average increase in risk-adjusted returns for investors. The finding comes from a study co-authored by a researcher at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Thursday 28 September 2017 The research shows that certain commodity strategies make investors better off when included in portfolios that consist of stocks, bonds, and cash.

Economics / Business - Career - 11.09.2017
Employee outsourcing hides slaves in the workforce, shows research
Failure to monitor outsourced recruitment is resulting in companies inadvertently employing victims of modern slavery, according to new research led by our School of Management. Interview The research, conducted with the University of Sheffield, suggests that layers of outsourcing, subcontracting and informal hiring of temporary staff are to blame.

Health - Economics / Business - 24.08.2017
Illegal dumping during road construction in Ethiopia affects child mortality
Researchers have shown that living near newly built roads in Ethiopia is associated with higher rates of infant mortality. Proximity to new roads has negative health effects because of toxic waste dumped illegally during the construction phase, according to early research by economists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Trinity College Dublin (TCD).

Economics / Business - Social Sciences - 23.08.2017
Personality drives purchasing of luxury goods
People who are 'extraverted' and on low incomes buy more luxury goods than their introverted peers to compensate for the experience of low financial status, finds new UCL research. The study, published today in Psychological Science , used real life spending data from UK bank accounts to investigate the spending habits of richer and poorer people with different personality types.

Economics / Business - Career - 09.08.2017
August: Workplace menopause study finds ’women feel they need to cope alone’ | News | University of Bristol
A call for more menopause-friendly workplaces is made in a new Government report prepared by a team from the Universities of Bristol and Leicester. In the most comprehensive study of its kind, the report reveals that 'many women tend to feel that they need to cope alone' because of a reluctance to speak up at work.

Computer Science - Economics / Business - 08.08.2017
Cybercriminals are not as anonymous as we think | University of Oxford
Understanding a cybercriminal's backstory - where they live, what they do and who they know, is key to cracking cybercrime, new research suggests. Online crime is of course online, but there is also a surprisingly strong offline and local dimension. Cybercriminals are often seen as faceless, international, computer masterminds, who are almost impossible to identify or understand as a result.

Economics / Business - Environment - 31.07.2017
Benefits of dikes outweigh costs - effective measures for reducing future flooding
In the first study of its kind, an international team of scientists - including the University of Bristol - has concluded, on a global scale, that the economic and long-term benefits of building dikes to reduce flood damage far outweigh their initial cost. They found that in many parts of the world, it is even possible to reduce the economic damage from river floods in the future to below today's levels, even when climate change, growing populations, and urbanisation are taken into account.

Economics / Business - Career - 20.07.2017
Individual personal pensions fare worse than group pensions, shows research
People who take out an individual personal pension can expect lower returns than those who invest in a group personal pension plan, suggests new research from the University of Bath's School of Management. Individual investors are losing out The study finds that individual investors lose out by over 1 per cent a year in comparison with group personal pension plans negotiated by employers, even before differences in fees are taken into account.