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Health - Computer Science - 22.05.2020
New contact tracing app for COVID-19 spread designed to protect privacy
A new app developed at Imperial College London aims to protect privacy whilst trying to minimise coronavirus spread. As part of their efforts to slow the outbreak of coronavirus , international governments, research institutions and industry are developing contact tracing apps to record interactions between people.

Physics - Computer Science - 20.05.2020
Quantum leap: Bristol's photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
Quantum leap: Bristol’s photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
The development of quantum technologies promises to have a profound impact across science, engineering and society. Quantum computers at scale will be able to solve problems intractable on even the most powerful current supercomputers, with many revolutionary applications, for example, in the design of new drugs and materials.

Computer Science - Pharmacology - 18.05.2020
AI successfully used to identify different types of brain injuries
AI successfully used to identify different types of brain injuries
Researchers at Imperial College London and Cambridge have developed an AI algorithm that can detect and identify different types of brain injuries. The researchers found that their machine learning algorithm was able to detect, segment, quantify and differentiate between types of brain lesions using images of CT scans.

Computer Science - 06.04.2020
AI techniques used to improve battery health and safety
AI techniques used to improve battery health and safety
Researchers have designed a machine learning method that can predict battery health with 10x higher accuracy than current industry standard, which could aid in the development of safer and more reliable batteries for electric vehicles and consumer electronics. The researchers, from Cambridge and Newcastle Universities, have designed a new way to monitor batteries by sending electrical pulses into them and measuring the response.

Physics - Computer Science - 13.03.2020
New microscopy technique helps pictures tell a thousand words
A new imaging method combined with machine learning uncovers previously hidden information in micrographs of biological cells to reveal quantitative information of gene expression levels. Researchers from the University of Glasgow's James Watt School of Engineering and School of Computing Science describe in a paper published today how they have used image analysis and machine learning as a tool to directly determine the gene activity in single cells.

Computer Science - 17.02.2020
South West to host Europe’s largest Arm supercomputer
The region's leading universities, the GW4 Alliance, together with the Met Office, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), and partners, have been awarded £4.1 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to create Isambard 2, the largest Arm-based supercomputer in Europe.

Health - Computer Science - 11.02.2020
Skin cancer diagnosis apps are unreliable and poorly regulated
Smartphone apps used as ‘early warning systems' for skin cancer are poorly regulated and frequently cannot be relied upon to produce accurate results, according to new analysis by experts at the University of Birmingham. Skin cancer detection apps are designed to ensure that the right people seek medical attention by providing a risk assessment of a new or changing mole.

Computer Science - 10.02.2020
New system to detect cyber-attacks on smart devices in the home
A novel system capable of detecting and classifying cyber-attacks on smart devices around our homes has been developed by experts at Cardiff University. The system can distinguish between malicious or benign activity and detect attacks on devices such as the Amazon Echo Dot and Apple TV with a 90 per cent accuracy.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 16.01.2020
Artificial intelligence used to predict 3D structure of proteins
A deep learning system can predict the structure of a protein using its genetic sequence more accurately than any previous modelling system, according to a study by researchers at DeepMind and UCL. Nearly every function our body performs relies on proteins. Predicting the intricate 3D structure of a protein is important because its structure largely determines its function and, once the structure is known, scientists can develop drugs that target this unique shape.

Physics - Computer Science - 23.12.2019
First chip-to-chip quantum teleportation harnessing silicon photonic chip fabrication
First chip-to-chip quantum teleportation harnessing silicon photonic chip fabrication
The development of technologies which can process information based on the laws of quantum physics are predicted to have profound impacts on modern society. For example, quantum computers may hold the key to solving problems that are too complex for today's most powerful supercomputers, and a quantum internet could ultimately protect the worlds information from malicious attacks.

Computer Science - 11.12.2019
Undervolting allows attacks on Intel’s secure enclaves
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have identified a weakness in Intel's processors: by undervolting the CPU, Intel's secure enclave technology becomes vulnerable to attack. Modern processors are being pushed to perform faster than ever before - and with this comes increases in heat and power consumption.

Computer Science - Health - 29.11.2019
Opinion: How the technology behind deepfakes can benefit all of society
Professor Geraint Rees, Pro-Vice-Provost of Artificial Intelligence at UCL, writes that AI can and must be used for good, to complement and augment human endeavour rather than replace it. Recent advances in deepfake video technology have led to a rapid increase of such videos in the public domain in the past year.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 22.10.2019
Rebel robot helps researchers understand human-machine cooperation
In a new twist on human-robot research, computer scientists at the University of Bristol have developed a handheld robot that first predicts then frustrates users by rebelling against their plans, thereby demonstrating an understanding of human intention. In an increasingly technological world, cooperation between humans and machines is an essential aspect of automation.

Computer Science - 20.10.2019
Artificial skin creates first ticklish devices
Artificial skin creates first ticklish devices
A new interface developed by researchers in Bristol and Paris takes touch technology to the next level by providing an artificial skin-like membrane for augmenting interactive devices such as phones, wearables or computers. The Skin-On interface, developed by researchers in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Bristol in partnership with Telecomm ParisTech and Sorbonne University , mimics human skin in appearance but also in sensing resolution.

Social Sciences - Computer Science - 15.10.2019
Increase in online hate speech leads to more crimes against minorities
An increase in hate speech on social media leads to more crimes against minorities in the physical world, a study shows. Academics from Cardiff University's HateLab project collected Twitter and police recorded crime data from London over an eight-month period to analyse whether a significant association existed.

Health - Computer Science - 24.09.2019
Artificial intelligence may be as effective as health professionals at diagnosing disease, finds study
Artificial intelligence (AI) appears to detect diseases from medical imaging with similar levels of accuracy as health-care professionals, according to research led by the University of Birmingham and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust. The research, the first systematic review and meta-analysis synthesising all the available evidence from scientific literature, was published today in The Lancet Digital Health .

Computer Science - Mathematics - 24.09.2019
Numbers limit how accurately digital computers model chaos
Numbers limit how accurately digital computers model chaos
Digital computers use numbers based on flawed representations of real numbers, which may lead to inaccuracies when simulating the motion of molecules, weather systems and fluids, find UCL and Tufts University scientists. The study, published today in Advanced Theory and Simulations , shows that digital computers cannot reliably reproduce the behaviour of 'chaotic systems' which are widespread.

Health - Computer Science - 06.09.2019
Blast impact and cancer cuts: News from the College
Blast impact and cancer cuts: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From fresh insights into the impact of blast injuries on children, to a technological way to cut womb cancer wait times, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Impact of child blast injuries revealed A new BMJ paper has outlined the effects of blast injuries on children compared to adults.

Computer Science - Environment - 14.08.2019
GW4 supercomputer Isambard proves competitive
Researchers from GW4 universities Bristol and Cardiff assessed the performance of the GW4 Alliance Isambard supercomputer using an open-source Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code. The research team consisted of Unai Lopez Novoa, Data Innovation Research Institute; Pablo Ouro Barba, Cardiff School of Engineering; Dr James Price, University of Bristol and Professor Simon McIntosh Smith, the principal investigator for the Isambard project and a professor of high-performance computing at the University of Bristol.

Computer Science - 06.08.2019
New technology to monitor anti-Polish hate online
Artificial intelligence is being used to tackle anti-Polish hate crime in the run up to Brexit. Researchers at HateLab, based at Cardiff University, are working with Samurai Labs, a Polish Artificial Intelligence laboratory, to monitor aggressive social media content and pinpoint any connections to offline events.
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