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Chemistry



Results 61 - 80 of 508.


Physics - Chemistry - 11.05.2018
X-rays from tabletop lasers allows scientists to peer through the ’water window’
Studying the fleeting actions of electrons in organic materials will now be much easier, thanks to a new method for generating fast X-rays. The technique means advanced measurements of fast reactions will now be possible in physics labs around the world, without having to wait to use expensive and scarce equipment.

Environment - Chemistry - 04.05.2018
Greenhouse gas 'feedback loop' discovered in freshwater lakes
Greenhouse gas ’feedback loop’ discovered in freshwater lakes
Latest research finds plant debris in lake sediment affects methane emissions. The flourishing reed beds created by changing climates could threaten to double the already significant methane production of the world's northern lakes.

Health - Chemistry - 26.04.2018
The complicated biology of garlic
Researchers today generally agree that eating garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes, but exactly how it does this is a still a mystery that needs more research.

Chemistry - 18.04.2018
Researchers identify "smell" given off by malaria-infected children
Children infected with malaria give off a distinctive smell through their skin which makes them even more attractive to mosquitoes, researchers have found. In a new study published today a team including scientists from Cardiff University have been able to identify this unique chemical fingerprint for the very first time, opening up the possibility of developing a system to lure mosquitoes away from human populations.

Health - Chemistry - 16.04.2018
Improved method of delivering anti-cancer drugs
A new non-toxic method for delivering anti-cancer drugs to specific parts of the human body could mean the end of the severe and nasty side effects associated with many cancer therapies, according to researchers at Cardiff University's School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. The method involves the use of a new type of a nanotube - a tiny tube used in many applications, including drug delivery.

Health - Chemistry - 10.04.2018
New class of drugs could help tackle treatment-resistant cancers
Researchers have discovered a new class of drug that has the potential to help cancer patients who no longer respond to existing therapies. The drug may not become available to patients for a number of years yet, but researchers believe that if clinical trials are successful, it could be used to tackle a variety of treatment-resistant cancers.

Physics - Chemistry - 06.04.2018
Unlocking the secrets of ice
Unlocking the secrets of ice
The complex properties of water and ice are not well understood but a team from UCL and the ISIS Neutron and Muon Source have revealed new information about a phase of ice called 'ice II'. Given that water makes up 60% of our bodies and is one of the most abundant molecules in the universe, it's no wonder that water is known as the "matrix of life". There are many different forms of ice - all of which vary significantly from the ice you'd find in your freezer.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.03.2018
Reading of biological molecules improved up to 100x by doubling the sensors
A coupled system of two miniature detectors called nanopores improves detection of biological molecules, including DNA and markers of early disease. The ability to control the motion of single biological molecules is key to improving a wide range of biophysical and diagnostic applications, such as DNA sequencing and the detection of rare molecules linked to diagnosis and prognosis of disease.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 21.03.2018
'Wiggling and jiggling': new study helps explain how organisms can evolve to live at different temperatures
’Wiggling and jiggling’: new study helps explain how organisms can evolve to live at different temperatures
The brilliant physicist Richard Feynman famously said that, in principle, biology can be explained by understanding the wiggling and jiggling of atoms. For the first time, new research from the University of Bristol, UK and the University of Waikoto, New Zealand explains how this 'wiggling and jiggling' of the atoms in enzymes - the proteins that make biological reactions happen - is 'choreographed' to make them work at a particular temperature.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 13.03.2018
Artificial and biological cells work together as mini chemical factories
Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. The system, created by a team from Imperial College London, encapsulates biological cells within an artificial cell. Using this, researchers can harness the natural ability of biological cells to process chemicals while protecting them from the environment.

Physics - Chemistry - 08.03.2018
Plastic fantastic – researchers turn plastic pollution into cleaners
Plastic fantastic – researchers turn plastic pollution into cleaners
Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered a way to re-use a common plastic to break down harmful dyes in our waste water. The paper published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces by a joint UK and Brazilian research team describes how synthetic dyes, used in the clothing industry world-wide, could be treated by the plastic found in packaging and cutlery - polystyrene.

Chemistry - Innovation / Technology - 27.02.2018
Alternative to traditional batteries moves a step closer to reality after exciting progress in supercapacitor technology
Alternative to traditional batteries moves a step closer to reality after exciting progress in supercapacitor technology
Lithium-ion batteries could be under threat after the development of polymer materials by the Universities of Bristol and Surrey, along with Superdielectrics Ltd, that could challenge the dominance of these traditional batteries - and they are ready to demonstrate their results. Only one year ago, the partners announced scientific results for novel polymer materials that have dielectric properties 1,000 to 10,000 times greater than existing electrolytes (electrical conductors).

Physics - Chemistry - 26.02.2018
Supercomputer model reveals how sticky tape makes graphene
Supercomputer model reveals how sticky tape makes graphene
Scientists at UCL have explained for the first time the mystery of why adhesive tape is so useful for graphene production. The study, published in Advanced Materials , used supercomputers to model the process through which graphene sheets are exfoliated from graphite, the material in pencils. Graphene is known for being the strongest material in the world, lightweight and with extraordinary electrical, thermal and optical properties.

Health - Chemistry - 22.02.2018
Carbon monoxide detection in the body could lead to rapid disease diagnostics
A quick and reliable way to detect levels of carbon monoxide in the body could allow clinicians to diagnose disease. Carbon monoxide is normally considered in terms of the amount of damage it can cause us, but a team of scientists at Imperial College London and the Polytechnic University of Valencia have been looking at the other biological roles it can play.

Chemistry - 16.02.2018
Complex plants were first to conquer land
The first plants to conquer land were a much more complex species than has previously been assumed, new research has shown. Before the first land plants appeared on Earth around half a billion years ago, Earth would have looked unrecognisable with no grass, trees or even mosses. Up until now, mosses and their relatives the hornworts and liverworts have been regarded as the first true plants on dry land.

Health - Chemistry - 12.02.2018
Lung cancer drug resistance explained by computer simulations
Lung cancer drug resistance explained by computer simulations
Scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Parma, Italy, have used molecular simulations to understand resistance to osimertinib - an anticancer drug used to treat types of lung cancer. Osimertinib binds tightly to a protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in many tumours.

Chemistry - Earth Sciences - 06.02.2018
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing
The ozone layer is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes. Global ozone has been declining since the 1970s owing to certain man-made chemicals. Since these were banned, parts of the layer have been recovering, particularly at the poles.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 05.02.2018
When did flowers originate?
When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research. The study, published today in New Phytologist by researchers from the UK and China, shows that flowering plants are neither as old as suggested by previous molecular studies, nor as young as a literal interpretation of their fossil record.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 05.02.2018
When did flowers originate?
When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research, co-authored by the University of Bristol. The study, published today in New Phytologist by researchers from the UK and China, shows that flowering plants are neither as old as suggested by previous molecular studies, nor as young as a literal interpretation of their fossil record.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.01.2018
Adding graphene girders to silicon electrodes could double the life of lithium batteries
New research led by WMG, at the University of Warwick has found an effective approach to replacing graphite in the anodes of lithium-ion batteries using silicon, by reinforcing the anode's structure with graphene girders. This could more than double the life of rechargeable lithium-ion based batteries and also increase the capacity delivered by those batteries.

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