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Chemistry



Results 101 - 120 of 501.


Life Sciences - Chemistry - 15.05.2017
Female fruit flies become more aggressive towards each other after sex
Female fruit flies become more aggressive towards each other after sex
Chemicals in male fruit flies' semen cause females to become more aggressive and intolerant towards each other after mating, research reveals. Studies in many animal species have shown a direct link between increased levels of aggression in females and reproduction and egg laying. This is thought to be because the females compete more strongly for food to help support the growth of fertilised eggs, and also because they want to protect and provide for their offspring.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 24.04.2017
Caterpillar found to eat shopping bags, suggesting biodegradable solution to plastic pollution
Caterpillar found to eat shopping bags, suggesting biodegradable solution to plastic pollution
A common insect larva that eats beeswax has been found to break down chemical bonds in the plastic used for packaging and shopping bags at uniquely high speeds. Scientists say the discovery could lead to a biotechnological approach to the polyethylene waste that chokes oceans and landfills.

Health - Chemistry - 13.04.2017
New insights into the molecular processes of immune regulation
New insights into the molecular processes of immune regulation
Researchers from the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology have made an important discovery that might lead to novel therapies to combat chronic inflammation. The work, jointly funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Wellcome Trust, is published in the Journal of Immunology and focuses on so-called danger signals such as reactive oxygen species that are released by damaged or dying cells during wounding or infection, and their impact on the subsequent immune response.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.03.2017
Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easier
Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easier
Using sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials. This is the conclusion of a study published today led by researchers in the Department of Physics at Imperial College London, which could ultimately help improve solar energy technologies and be used for new applications, such as using sunlight to break down harmful chemicals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.03.2017
New technology enables detailed analysis of target proteins
New technology enables detailed analysis of target proteins
A team of researchers from Queen Mary University of University (QMUL), Francis Crick Institute , Goethe University Frankfurt and University of Tübingen in Germany have developed a novel technology to understand how an important protein connects to other cellular proteins.  Ubiquitin is a small protein that controls and modulates the function of other cellular proteins by connecting to them.

Health - Chemistry - 15.03.2017
Creating artemisinin
Researchers at Cardiff University have devised a new way of creating a drug commonly used as the first line of defence against malaria around the world. Artemisinin is a drug recommended by the World Health Organisation for treatment of all cases of severe malaria and works by attacking all stages of the malaria parasite in the blood.

Chemistry - Environment - 14.03.2017
Doubts about whether internet filters protect teenagers online
Ancient fossilised algae may be the gateway to understanding the atmospheric carbon dioxide levels of the Earth during the dinosaur era, and the role this played in changing the prehistoric climate. Copyright: Shutterstock Ancient fossilised algae may be the gateway to understanding carbon dioxide and the role it played in transforming the prehistoric climate, a new  Oxford University  study has found.

Health - Chemistry - 07.03.2017
New target treatment for high blood pressure
Blood pressure could be more effectively controlled as new target for treatment is discovered New more effective treatments for high blood pressure could be possible thanks to the discovery by King's College London researchers that the nitric oxide that regulates blood pressure is formed in nerves rather than in the walls of blood vessels.

Health - Chemistry - 01.03.2017
New research could increase availability of life saving drug
New research could increase availability of life saving drug
An effective treatment for a deadly strain of meningitis could become more readily available in less developed nations as a result of research led by Professor Graham Sandford of the Department of Chemistry. Cryptococcal Meningitis (CM) is the leading cause of meningitis in Saharan Africa and also accounts for 20% of HIV/AIDs deaths worldwide.

Health - Chemistry - 20.02.2017
Potential drugs for cancer and diabetes treatment created at University of Bath
Potential drugs for cancer and diabetes treatment created at University of Bath
New molecules which scientists hope could one day become drugs for both cancer and diabetes have been created at the University of Bath. The compounds can increase glucose uptake into fat cells and could help diabetes patients manage their disease. They also reduce the proliferation of colon cancer cells, and could be used to reveal the link between diabetes and cancer, which is poorly understood.

Environment - Chemistry - 17.02.2017
The University of Nottingham launches new tool to evaluate peatland sensitivity to global climate change
Scientists at The University of Nottingham are using radar waves as part of a new tool developed to evaluate peatland sensitivity to global climate change. The new method is based upon an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique that uses radar waves to measure vertical land surface motion.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.02.2017
Molecular phenomenon discovered by advanced NMR facility
Cutting edge tech shows molecule self-assembling into different forms passing from solution state to solid state and back again - a curious phenomenon in science - says University of Warwick research Phenomenon discovered using state-of-the-art national solid-state NMR facility at Warwick Research published by Chemistry: A European Journal - designated as ‘Very Important Paper' Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling i

Chemistry - 01.02.2017
Breathing molecule discovered: vital to treating respiratory conditions
Vital molecule which regulates breathing discovered by University of Warwick researchers Connexin26 detects CO2 levels in body and activates body's breathing mechanisms - and has been specially tuned by evolution for this purpose Discovery could lead to more targeted treatments of respiratory problems & congenital deafness Respiratory conditions could be better targeted and treated, thanks to the discovery of the vital molecule which regulates breathing - according to research by the University of Warwick.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 30.01.2017
Gene key for chemically reprogramming human stem cells
Gene key for chemically reprogramming human stem cells
Scientists have discovered the gene essential for chemically reprogramming human amniotic stem cells into a more versatile state similar to embryonic stem cells, in research led by UCL and Heinrich Heine University. The finding is an important step towards deriving reprogrammed cells that could be stored and used in therapies and research, providing an ethical alternative to human embryonic stem cells.

Health - Chemistry - 23.01.2017
Opinion: How dangerous is burnt toast?
Opinion: How dangerous is burnt toast?
A new campaign is warning people that burning some food, such as toast, is a potential cancer risk. Here, the evidence for this claim is explored by David Spiegelhalter, Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk at the new Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.01.2017
Graphene's sleeping superconductivity awakens
Graphene’s sleeping superconductivity awakens
Since its discovery in 2004, scientists have believed that graphene may have the innate ability to superconduct. Now Cambridge researchers have found a way to activate that previously dormant potential. It has long been postulated that graphene should undergo a superconducting transition, but can't. The idea of this experiment was, if we couple graphene to a superconductor, can we switch that intrinsic superconductivity on?

Chemistry - Environment - 18.01.2017
Faster recharging batteries possible after new insights
Faster recharging batteries possible after new insights
Faster recharging lithium batteries could be developed after scientists figured out why adding charged metal atoms to tunnel structures within batteries improves their performance. Rechargeable lithium batteries have helped power the ‘portable revolution' in mobile phones, laptops and tablet computers, and new generations of lithium batteries are being developed for electric vehicles and to store energy from wind and solar power.

Chemistry - Physics - 03.01.2017
‘Glue’ that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers
Molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair could hold the key to making possible wooden skyscrapers and more energy-efficient paper production, according to research published . The study, led by a father and son team at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge, solves a long-standing mystery of how key sugars in cells bind to form strong, indigestible materials.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.12.2016
First movie of energy transfer in photosynthesis solves decades-old debate
First movie of energy transfer in photosynthesis solves decades-old debate
Using ultrafast imaging of moving energy in photosynthesis, scientists have determined the speed of crucial processes for the first time. This should help scientists understand how nature has perfected the process of photosynthesis, and how this might be copied to produce fuels by artificial photosynthesis.

Chemistry - Physics - 21.12.2016
‘Glue' that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers
‘Glue’ that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers
Molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair could hold the key to making possible wooden skyscrapers and more energy-efficient paper production, according to research published today . The study, led by a father and son team at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge, solves a long-standing mystery of how key sugars in cells bind to form strong, indigestible materials.

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