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Results 101 - 120 of 121.


Health - Career - 21.01.2015
Researchers call for more specialist nurses to support workers with Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Researchers have found that specialist nurses play a crucial role in helping those with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) stay in work. A report by Lancaster University's Work Foundation recommends an increase in the number of specialist nurses to help people with IBD manage their condition in the workplace.

Career - Health - 24.11.2014
New research centre to tackle musculoskeletal disorders in the workplace
Almost 31 million days of work were lost last year due to back, neck and muscle problems The University of Liverpool and the University of Southampton have announced a major new research centre to tackle the impact of musculoskeletal disorders on people's ability to work. Researchers at the £1.4m Arthritis Research UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal  Health and Work aim to find cost-effective ways of reducing the impact of conditions that affect the muscles, joints and bones on people's employment and productivity.

Social Sciences - Career - 05.11.2014
More of us are heading down the social ladder
A study led by Oxford University shows that, contrary to what is widely supposed, there has been no decline in social mobility in Britain over recent decades but rather than going up as in the past, more of us are moving down the social ladder. The study by Oxford University, with the London School of Economics and Political Sciences, is published in the early online issue of the British Journal of Sociology .

Career - Health - 03.11.2014
Enhancing and Embedding Staff Engagement in the NHS: Putting Theory into Practice
Enhancing and Embedding Staff Engagement in the NHS: Putting Theory into Practice The NHS has published today, 3 November 2014, a series of engagement guides and a toolkit on enhancing and embedding staff engagement, which stem from a research project led by Prof Katie Bailey. The project, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, undertook a rapid review of the evidence-base relating to employee engagement.

Health - Career - 22.10.2014
Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life
Press release issued: 22 October 2014 Those who self-harm as teenagers are more at risk of developing mental health and substance misuse problems as adults, new research from the biggest study of its kind in the UK has revealed. Researchers at the University of Bristol, working together with colleagues from the University of Oxford and University College London, collected data from 4,799 adolescents as part of Children of the 90s - one of the world's largest population studies - to examine the outcomes of self-harm for the first time.

Psychology - Career - 20.08.2014
Feeling bad at work can be a good thing
Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes. In a Special Issue published in Human Relations , Dr Dirk Lindebaum from the University's Management School , together with his co-author Professor Peter Jordan, developed a new line of study, and commissioned research to further explore the role of emotions in the workplace.

Pedagogy - Career - 17.07.2014
Women’s professional self-identity impacts on childcare balance, but not men’s
Research shows that a mother's self-identity impacts on the amount of time her partner spends on childcare - with strong professional identity in women creating a more equal childcare balance in a couple. A father's self-identity, however, has no bearing on a mother's time with children.

Law - Career - 10.07.2014
I’ve been working like a dog: revisiting a 1960s study of the working class
The Beatles' song A Hard Day's Night was released 50 years ago today. Its runaway success in the charts overlapped with a major sociological study of the newly-affluent working class that features in Lennon and McCartney's lyrics.

Career - Health - 13.03.2014
Review of home care visits for the elderly finds 'no proven benefit'
Review of home care visits for the elderly finds 'no proven benefit'
In what's thought to be the biggest review of academic literature into whether home care visits provide benefits for the elderly, researchers conclude there is 'no consistent evidence' to show they lead to the elderly living longer or having more independent lives than those without any visits.

Career - Health - 12.03.2014
Review of home visits for the elderly finds 'no proven benefit'
Review of home visits for the elderly finds 'no proven benefit'
In what's thought to be the biggest review of academic literature into whether home visits provide benefits for the elderly, researchers conclude there is 'no consistent evidence' to show they lead to the elderly living longer or having more independent lives than those without any visits. Researchers from University College London (UCL) and the University of Oxford analysed 64 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), mainly in the United States, Canada and the UK.

Career - Economics / Business - 01.03.2014
Self-employed men have higher levels of testosterone, study finds
An abundance of the sex hormone testosterone is associated with being self-employed, a study from the University of Birmingham, University of Surrey and the University of Adelaide study has found. Researchers from the three universities found that in a study of Australian men, those individuals with higher testosterone levels were more likely to be self-employed than either employed or not working.

Career - Economics / Business - 30.01.2014
LGB workers twice as likely to experience workplace bullying and discrimination, study finds
Lesbian, gay and bisexual workers are more than twice as likely to experience discrimination at work as their heterosexual colleagues, a national study has revealed. More than 1,200 employees were interviewed by academics from Plymouth University and the Manchester Business School, with the results showing one in 10 LGBs had been subjected to discrimination in the last 12 months, as opposed to one in 20 heterosexuals.

Career - Social Sciences - 28.01.2014
Online abuse victims let down by lack of training for child support workers, study reveals
Child victims of online sexual abuse may not be getting the right protection or support because training for child workers has not kept pace with technological advances, according to new research out today. A survey of health, education and children’s services workers across England revealed a black hole in the knowledge and capabilities of professionals charged with assisting children who have been abused through the internet.

Health - Career - 09.10.2013
One in three older people experience age discrimination
One in three older people experience age discrimination
New research from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) reveals 33 per cent of all older people experience perceived age discrimination, with less wealthy older men being at highest risk. The study highlights the high levels of age discrimination faced by older people, a situation that worsens as they age.

Administration - Career - 26.03.2013
Manchester Chief Constable makes diversity pledge
The Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police has said he will ensure his staff are treated fairly and that he will build a diverse workforce. Sir Peter Fahy has accepted the recommendations of a University of Manchester report, which found that ethnicity was a factor in internal misconduct and counter-corruption investigations involving police officers and staff.

Career - Health - 05.03.2013
Disabled employees more likely to be attacked and bullied at work, research finds
Employees with disabilities are twice as likely to be attacked at work and experience much higher rates of insults, ridicule and intimidation, a new study has found. Research from the universities of Plymouth and Cardiff found people with physical or psychological disabilities or long-term illness reported higher rates of 21 types of ill-treatment than did other workers.

Economics / Business - Career - 25.02.2013
Entrepreneurs really do matter as study shows 60% sales drop after founders die
The death of a founding entrepreneur wipes out on average 60 per cent of a firm's sales and cuts jobs by around 17 per cent, according to a new study. The research, by Sascha O. Becker at the University of Warwick and Hans K. Hvide at the University of Bergen, sheds light on exactly how much a founder-entrepreneur ‘matters' in terms of influencing the performance of privately-owned businesses.

Health - Career - 21.01.2013
Cleaning jobs linked to asthma risk
Cleaning jobs linked to asthma risk
A new study has found strong evidence for a link between cleaning jobs and risk of developing asthma. Researchers at Imperial College London tracked the occurrence of asthma in a group of 9,488 people born in Britain in 1958. Not including those who had asthma as children, nine per cent developed asthma by age 42.

Career - Economics / Business - 05.11.2012
Hidden cyberbullying is as common as conventional counterpart in the workplace
Hidden cyberbullying is as common as conventional counterpart in the workplace
Cyberbullying through e-mail, text and web posts is as common in the workplace as conventional bullying but even more difficult to uncover, research by experts from the University of Sheffield has revealed. Occupational psychologists Christine Sprigg, Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley of the University of Sheffield, together with Iain Coyne of the University of Nottingham, turned the focus of their investigation onto cyberbullying of adult workers, instead of younger people in schools, for which more research has taken place.

Economics / Business - Career - 03.11.2012
Punched from the Screen - workplace cyber bullying becoming more widespread
Punched from the Screen - workplace cyber bullying becoming more widespread
Cyber bullying - using modern such as e-mails, texts or web-postings - is as common in the workplace as ‘conventional' bullying. Yet, the way cyber bullying influences both the victim and witnesses is more hidden in the workplace. These are the findings of ‘Punched from the Screen' - new research into workplace bullying carried out by occupational psychologists at The University of Nottingham and the University of Sheffield.

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