news

« BACK

Astronomy/Space Science



Results 561 - 580 of 582.
« Previous 1 ... 25 26 27 28 29 ... 30 Next »


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.03.2013
Planck captures portrait of the young Universe, revealing earliest light
Satellite's first all-sky image is the most detailed picture to date of the early Universe, giving us a better understanding of its birth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2013
Beyond the blinding starlight
Study reveals chemical composites of exoplanet atmospheres 128 light years away. Scientists say techniques will "one day provide evidence of life beyond Earth". The really exciting thing is that, one day, the techniques we've developed will give us our first secure evidence of the existence of life on a planet outside our solar system Ian Parry Astronomers have conducted the first remote reconnaissance of a distant solar system, using new telescope imaging techniques to reveal the chemical composition of exoplanets orbiting a star 128 light years from Earth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 11.03.2013
Auroras shine light on solar flares
Astrophysicists at the University of Glasgow are looking to the Northern and Southern Lights to expand our understanding of solar flares. In a new paper published in the Astrophysical Journal, researchers from the University's School of Physics and Astronomy suggest magnetic waves, which contribute to the formation of auroras on Earth, could help energy from solar flares travel tens of thousands of kilometres in under a second.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 07.03.2013
The Liverpool View: Did we discover a Higgs?
July 4th, 2012 – a landmark, red-letter day in a physicist's calendar. It was the day that CERN webcast a special seminar of the latest results from the Large Hadron Collider. It was the day when the world went particle physics mad, celebrating the discovery of the long sought and long elusive Higgs boson.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.02.2013
Small sun hosts mini planet in distant solar system
Scientists have detected a rocky planet that is smaller than Mercury, the smallest planet in our solar system, orbiting a solar-type star 80% of the size and mass of the Sun, according to research published today (Wednesday 20 February 2013). The exact dimensions of the star, and the absolute size of the planet, were determined by asteroseismologists led by the University of Birmingham.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 07.02.2013
New Sussex study furthers Einstein's 'theory of everything'
New Sussex study furthers Einstein’s ’theory of everything’
Sussex physicists have taken a small step towards fulfilling Einstein's dream of proving there is only one fundamental force in nature. Following last year's discovery of the Higgs boson particle - the so-called "God particle" that answers how the particles have masses - Xavier Calmet and PhD student Michael Atkins looked at how the Higgs field interacts with gravity.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 04.02.2013
First evidence discovered that water once dissolved the surface of Mars
Scientists at the University of Glasgow together with the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre and the Natural History Museum (London) have discovered the first evidence of water dissolving the surface of Mars. In a paper published in the Meteoritical Society's journal MAPS , the research team outline the results of tests on a 1.7-gram fragment of a Martian meteorite known as Nakhla, which was provided by the Natural History Museum.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.01.2013
Gas promises bumper black hole 'weigh-in'
Gas promises bumper black hole 'weigh-in'
A new way of measuring the mass of supermassive black holes could revolutionise our understanding of how they form and help to shape galaxies. The technique, developed by a team including Oxford University scientists, can spot the telltale tracer of carbon monoxide within the cloud of gas (mostly hydrogen) circling a supermassive black hole at the centre of a distant galaxy.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.01.2013
New study of solar system dust shows some is from interstellar space
New study of solar system dust shows some is from interstellar space
A new study by Michael Rowan-Robinson, former Head of Astrophysics at Imperial, and Brian May, who recently completed the PhD he abandoned to become Queen's lead guitarist, has modelled the space dust in the solar system. They conclude that 70 per cent of the dust that is found between the Sun and Mars comes from comets, 22 per cent is from asteroids and around seven and a half per cent comes from outside the solar system, dust from interstellar space.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.01.2013
Chameleon pulsar baffles astronomers
Chameleon pulsar baffles astronomers
Using a satellite X-ray telescope combined with terrestrial radio telescopes the pulsar was found to flip on a roughly half-hour timescale between two extreme states; one dominated by X-ray pulses, the other by a highly-organised pattern of radio pulses. The research was led by Wim Hermsen from The Netherlands Institute for Space Research and the University of Amsterdam and will appear in the journal Science on the 25th January 2012.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.01.2013
Effects of drought in the Amazon persist years later
Effects of drought in the Amazon persist years later
An area of the Amazon rainforest three times the size of the United kingdom was strongly affected by a drought that began in 2005, says a NASA-led team that includes researchers from Oxford. The results, together with observed increases in rainfall variability and associated forest damage in southern and western Amazonia during the past decade, suggest these rainforests may be witnessing the first signs of potential large-scale degradation due to climate change.

Astronomy / Space Science - 07.01.2013
'Traffic jam' of moons in habitable zone
'Traffic jam' of moons in habitable zone
Volunteers from the Planethunters.org website, part of the Oxford University-led Zooniverse project, have discovered 15 new planet candidates orbiting in the habitable zones of other stars. Added to the 19 similar planets already discovered in habitable zones, where the temperature is neither too hot nor too cold for liquid water, the new finds suggest that there may be a 'traffic jam' of all kinds of strange worlds in regions that could potentially support life.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.12.2012
“missing link” of black holes
The discovery of a bingeing black hole that is expelling powerful beams of material has shed new light on some of the brightest X-ray sources seen in other galaxies, according to new research led by Durham University. Using Earth-orbiting X-ray telescopes, including NASA's Swift and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton satellites, a large international team of astronomers watched as the X-ray emission from the black hole in our nearest neighbouring galaxy, Andromeda - found more than 2 million light years away - brightened and faded over the course of six months.

Astronomy / Space Science - 05.12.2012
Sussex space scientists help to reveal brilliant world of starburst galaxies
Sussex space scientists help to reveal brilliant world of starburst galaxies
University of Sussex astronomers and space scientists in Hawaii have helped to reveal hundreds of previously unseen starburst galaxies - the birthplace of the stars that populate our Universe. The number of starburst galaxies observed by the European Space Agency's (ESA) Herschel space observatory and the ground-based Keck telescopes in Hawaii reveals the extraordinarily high star-formation rates across the history of the Universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.11.2012
Clearest evidence yet of polar ice losses
An international team of satellite experts has produced the most accurate assessment of ice losses from Antarctica and Greenland to date, ending 20 years of uncertainty. In a landmark study the researchers show that melting of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets has contributed 11.1 millimetres to global sea levels since 1992.

Astronomy / Space Science - Administration - 29.11.2012
Clearest evidence yet of polar ice losses
An international team involving Durham University experts has produced the most accurate assessment of ice losses from Antarctica and Greenland to date, ending 20 years of uncertainty. In a landmark study the researchers show that melting of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets has contributed 11.1 millimetres to global sea levels since 1992.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 28.11.2012
Graphite experiment shines new light on giant planets, white dwarfs & laser-driven fusion
An international team led by researchers from the University of Warwick and Oxford University is now dealing with unexpected results of an experiment with strongly heated graphite (up to 17,000 degrees Kelvin). The findings may pose a new problem for physicists working in laser-driven nuclear fusion and may also lead astrophysicists to revise our understanding of the life cycle of giant planets and stars.

Astronomy / Space Science - 22.11.2012
Astrophysicists show that dwarf planet Makemake has no atmosphere
A global team of scientists have observed the dwarf planet Makemake, 5000 million miles away, as it drifted in front of a distant star and blocked its light. The new observations have allowed them to check for the first time whether Makemake is surrounded by an atmosphere. This chilly world has an orbit lying in the outer Solar System and was expected to have an atmosphere like Pluto, but this is now shown not to be the case.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.11.2012
Astronomers from Durham University use prototype instrument to observe the total eclipse of the sun
Astronomers from Durham University use prototype instrument to observe the total eclipse of the sun
Astronomers from Durham University used a prototype of a new instrument being developed in collaboration with a team from Yunnan Astronomical Observatory in China, to observe the outer layers of the sun during a total solar eclipse visible from northern Queensland, Australia. The new instrument, named FASOT, is designed to measure the tangled magnetic field of the corona - the outer layer of the sun - leading to predictions of major "storms" which could affect the weather on earth and even knock out tele and power distribution.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 13.11.2012
Supersymmetry squeezed as LHC spots ultra rare particle decay
Supersymmetry squeezed as LHC spots ultra rare particle decay
An observation of this very rare decay is a key result that is putting our Supersymmetry theory colleagues in a spin. Results of this quality rely on the dedication and enthusiasm of research post-docs who analyse the data as it pours from the experiment" —Professor Val Gibson The result is very damaging to new theories like the extremely popular Supersymmetry.
« Previous 1 ... 25 26 27 28 29 ... 30 Next »