news

« BACK

Astronomy/Space Science



Results 541 - 560 of 571.
« Previous 1 ... 24 25 26 27 28 ... 29 Next »


Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 27.04.2013
New matter-antimatter difference
New matter-antimatter difference
27 Apr 2013 A subtle difference between matter and antimatter has been observed for the first time by the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The work forms part of studies to understand why the Universe only contains matter when it is believed that matter and antimatter were created in equal amounts at the time of the Big Bang.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 25.04.2013
CERN reveals new matter-antimatter difference
The LHCb collaboration at CERN has made its first observations of matter-antimatter asymmetry in the decays of the particle known as the B0s. Matter and antimatter are thought to have existed in equal amounts at the beginning of the universe, but today the universe appears to be composed essentially of matter.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.04.2013
Astrophysicists discover earliest known 'starburst' galaxy in Universe
Astrophysicists discover earliest known ’starburst’ galaxy in Universe
Astrophysicists discover earliest known 'starburst' galaxy in Universe University of Sussex astronomers using the Herschel Space Observatory are part of an international team that has discovered a distant star-forming galaxy that challenges the current theories of galaxy evolution. Seen when the Universe was less than a billion years old (880 million years) the galaxy, known only as "HFLS3", is forming stars at a much faster rate than should be possible according to existing predictions.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.04.2013
Astronomers are surprised to find a young galaxy producing new stars
Astronomers are surprised to find a young galaxy producing new stars
Astronomers have discovered an extremely distant galaxy that is expanding by more than 2000 new stars each year. Using the European Space Agency's Herschel space observatory they have seen images of the galaxy as it was when the Universe was less than a billion years old. This is the most active that astronomers have seen such a young galaxy and since this discovery they are re-thinking some fundamental ideas about how galaxies form and evolve over time.

Astronomy / Space Science - 27.03.2013
Summer melt season is getting longer on the Antarctic Peninsula, new research shows
New research from the Antarctic Peninsula published in the Journal of Geophysical Research shows that the summer melt season has been getting longer over the last 60 years. Dr Nick Barrand from the University of Birmingham led an analysis of data from 30 weather stations on the Antarctic Peninsula - a mountainous region extending northwards towards South America.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 26.03.2013
Ocean cores reveal eruption dynamics
Ocean cores reveal eruption dynamics
Using information gathered from samples of deep sea sediments, researchers from the University of Bristol report new findings regarding the dynamics of the eruption of Mount Tambora, Indonesia in 1815 - one of the largest volcanic eruptions in the last 1,000 years. Interpretation and understanding of such past eruptions are important for the assessment of hazards related to future eruptions.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.03.2013
Challenging our understanding of the Universe
Challenging our understanding of the Universe
The European Space Agency's Planck mission with the support of University astronomers has compiled the most detailed map ever created of the cosmic microwave background (the relic radiation from the Big Bang). The new map refines our understanding of the Universe's composition and evolution, and unveils new features that could challenge the foundations of our current understanding of its evolution.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.03.2013
Planck gives earliest snapshot of the Universe
Planck gives earliest snapshot of the Universe
A new map of the radiation left behind after the Big Bang is providing scientists with fresh insights into how our Universe formed. Europe's Planck satellite, a flagship mission for the UK Space Agency, has compiled the most detailed map ever of this leftover radiation - called the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.03.2013
Space telescope challenges understanding of the Universe
Space telescope challenges understanding of the Universe
Europe's Planck space telescope, which University of Manchester scientists at the Jodrell Bank Observatory helped build, has compiled the most detailed map of the post-Big Bang Universe ever recorded and thrown up anomalies that current physics cannot yet explain. But the data – released today (Thursday) by the European Space Agency – also provides the best evidence yet to support the standard model of cosmology, dates the Universe at 13.82 billion years and refines our knowledge of the Universe's composition and evolution.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.03.2013
Planck captures portrait of the young Universe, revealing earliest light
Satellite's first all-sky image is the most detailed picture to date of the early Universe, giving us a better understanding of its birth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2013
Beyond the blinding starlight
Study reveals chemical composites of exoplanet atmospheres 128 light years away. Scientists say techniques will "one day provide evidence of life beyond Earth". The really exciting thing is that, one day, the techniques we've developed will give us our first secure evidence of the existence of life on a planet outside our solar system Ian Parry Astronomers have conducted the first remote reconnaissance of a distant solar system, using new telescope imaging techniques to reveal the chemical composition of exoplanets orbiting a star 128 light years from Earth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 11.03.2013
Auroras shine light on solar flares
Astrophysicists at the University of Glasgow are looking to the Northern and Southern Lights to expand our understanding of solar flares. In a new paper published in the Astrophysical Journal, researchers from the University's School of Physics and Astronomy suggest magnetic waves, which contribute to the formation of auroras on Earth, could help energy from solar flares travel tens of thousands of kilometres in under a second.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 07.03.2013
The Liverpool View: Did we discover a Higgs?
July 4th, 2012 – a landmark, red-letter day in a physicist's calendar. It was the day that CERN webcast a special seminar of the latest results from the Large Hadron Collider. It was the day when the world went particle physics mad, celebrating the discovery of the long sought and long elusive Higgs boson.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.02.2013
Small sun hosts mini planet in distant solar system
Scientists have detected a rocky planet that is smaller than Mercury, the smallest planet in our solar system, orbiting a solar-type star 80% of the size and mass of the Sun, according to research published today (Wednesday 20 February 2013). The exact dimensions of the star, and the absolute size of the planet, were determined by asteroseismologists led by the University of Birmingham.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 07.02.2013
New Sussex study furthers Einstein's 'theory of everything'
New Sussex study furthers Einstein’s ’theory of everything’
Sussex physicists have taken a small step towards fulfilling Einstein's dream of proving there is only one fundamental force in nature. Following last year's discovery of the Higgs boson particle - the so-called "God particle" that answers how the particles have masses - Xavier Calmet and PhD student Michael Atkins looked at how the Higgs field interacts with gravity.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 04.02.2013
First evidence discovered that water once dissolved the surface of Mars
Scientists at the University of Glasgow together with the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre and the Natural History Museum (London) have discovered the first evidence of water dissolving the surface of Mars. In a paper published in the Meteoritical Society's journal MAPS , the research team outline the results of tests on a 1.7-gram fragment of a Martian meteorite known as Nakhla, which was provided by the Natural History Museum.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.01.2013
Gas promises bumper black hole 'weigh-in'
Gas promises bumper black hole 'weigh-in'
A new way of measuring the mass of supermassive black holes could revolutionise our understanding of how they form and help to shape galaxies. The technique, developed by a team including Oxford University scientists, can spot the telltale tracer of carbon monoxide within the cloud of gas (mostly hydrogen) circling a supermassive black hole at the centre of a distant galaxy.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.01.2013
New study of solar system dust shows some is from interstellar space
New study of solar system dust shows some is from interstellar space
A new study by Michael Rowan-Robinson, former Head of Astrophysics at Imperial, and Brian May, who recently completed the PhD he abandoned to become Queen's lead guitarist, has modelled the space dust in the solar system. They conclude that 70 per cent of the dust that is found between the Sun and Mars comes from comets, 22 per cent is from asteroids and around seven and a half per cent comes from outside the solar system, dust from interstellar space.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.01.2013
Chameleon pulsar baffles astronomers
Chameleon pulsar baffles astronomers
Using a satellite X-ray telescope combined with terrestrial radio telescopes the pulsar was found to flip on a roughly half-hour timescale between two extreme states; one dominated by X-ray pulses, the other by a highly-organised pattern of radio pulses. The research was led by Wim Hermsen from The Netherlands Institute for Space Research and the University of Amsterdam and will appear in the journal Science on the 25th January 2012.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.01.2013
Effects of drought in the Amazon persist years later
Effects of drought in the Amazon persist years later
An area of the Amazon rainforest three times the size of the United kingdom was strongly affected by a drought that began in 2005, says a NASA-led team that includes researchers from Oxford. The results, together with observed increases in rainfall variability and associated forest damage in southern and western Amazonia during the past decade, suggest these rainforests may be witnessing the first signs of potential large-scale degradation due to climate change.
« Previous 1 ... 24 25 26 27 28 ... 29 Next »