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Results 21 - 37 of 37.


Art and Design - Life Sciences - 20.05.2015
How we discovered the three revolutions of American pop
Dr Matthias Mauch discusses his recent scientific analysis of the "fossil record" of the Billboard charts prompted widespread attention, particularly the findings about the three musical "revolutions" that shaped the musical landscape of the second half of the 20th century. The journey that got me here started in 1992, when I was a sheltered 12-year-old boy, growing up in a small town in Germany.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 02.03.2015
Classical music relaxes dogs in rehoming centres
Classical music relaxes dogs in rehoming centres
A study conducted by the Scottish SPCA and the University of Glasgow shows that music has a calming effect on dogs. The research, conducted by the charity's education and research manager Gilly Mendes Ferreira and PhD student Amy Bowman, involved testing two groups of dogs over two consecutive weeks at the Scottish SPCA's Dumbarton & West of Scotland animal rescue and rehoming centre in Milton, West Dunbartonshire.

Art and Design - Social Sciences - 04.09.2014
How good is the fossil record?
Press release issued: 10 September 2014 The effect of movies featuring dogs on the popularity of dog breeds can last up to ten years and is correlated with the general success of the movies, according to new research from the University of Bristol, the City University of New York, and Western Carolina University.

Art and Design - 20.05.2014
Keeping to the beat is no mean feat: Scientists reveal how two tracks of music become one
How does a DJ mix two songs to make the beat seem common to both tracks? A successful DJ makes the transition between tracks appear seamless while a bad mix is instantly noticeable and results in a 'galloping horses' effect that disrupts the dancing of the crowd. How accurate does beat mixing need to be to enhance, rather than disrupt perceived rhythm?

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 23.04.2014
If music be the food of love, play something complex
If music be the food of love, play something complex
If music be the food of love, play something complex Although Charles Darwin first argued that music's primary function was sexual courtship, there has been little clear evidence to prove it. Now a new University of Sussex psychology study supports his theory by showing that during the most fertile phase of their menstrual cycle, women prefer sexual mates who are able to produce more complex music.

Art and Design - Social Sciences - 17.04.2014
Get on up: What the Godfather of Soul knew about rhythm
What is it about the rhythms of some music that makes us want to get up and dance? Oxford University researchers believe they may have found part of the answer in a new study. They say that an ideal balance of rhythmic predictability and complexity explains why James Brown will get most people up and grooving, while many of us struggle to tap our feet along with experimental jazz.

Art and Design - 03.03.2014
World-class orchestras judged by sight not sound
World-class orchestras judged by sight not sound
World-class orchestras can be accurately identified by silent video footage of performances, but not through sound recordings, a UCL study has found. Both professional musicians and musical novices are better at identifying top-ranked orchestras from non-ranked orchestras when shown silent video footage, suggesting that such judgements are driven at least in part by visual cues about group dynamics and leadership.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 18.11.2013
Brain study suggests classical musicians should improvise
Researchers have found that listeners engage with classical music more when musicians improvise. A collaboration of researchers from Imperial College London and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama examined the electrical signals in the brains of musicians and listeners. Although improvisation is not commonly associated with classical music, the new study suggests that introducing elements of improvisation into classical concerts could increase audience engagement.

Art and Design - Physics - 06.11.2013
Solar panels perform better when listening to music
Solar panels perform better when listening to music
The sound vibrations that make up music can make solar panels work harder, according to new research, and pop music performs better than classical. Scientists showed that high pitched sounds like those common in pop and rock music caused the greatest improvement in the solar cells' power output, increasing it by up to forty per cent.

Physics - Art and Design - 22.10.2013
Atomic movies reveal 'ultimate spring'
Atomic movies reveal 'ultimate spring'
An international team, including Oxford University scientists, has used the powerful X-ray laser at the US Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to create atomic-scale movies of 'the ultimate spring'. Normally, when a metal is crushed suddenly, as during an impact, it deforms and buckles, with the atoms re-arranging themselves in a complex way to take up the deformed shape - and usually only small pressures allow a metal to 'bounce back' like a spring.

Art and Design - 22.08.2013
Doing the math 'predicts' which movies will be box office hits
Researchers have devised a mathematical model which can be used to predict whether films will become blockbusters or flops at the box office - up to a month before the movie is released. Their model is based on an analysis of the activity on Wikipedia pages about American films released in 2009 and 2010.

Health - Art and Design - 01.07.2013
Improving community health and well-being
A new research project led by the School of Social Sciences will use creative arts practices to help inform health-related policy and service development. Funded jointly by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the 'Representing Communities' project, will use innovative research techniques to promote engagement between communities and policy makers.

Art and Design - 06.06.2013
Research on 1,000 paintings makes hundreds of new discoveries
New research and detailed records of over 1,000 paintings have gone online as part of an ongoing project to research over 22,000 artworks held in public collections around the UK. The National Inventory of Continental European Paintings (NICE Paintings) project is cataloguing and digitising all of the pre-1900 Continental European oil paintings in the UK's public collections and making them available to the public, alongside new supporting information.

Art and Design - Health - 06.07.2012
Does loud music wreck your hearing?
Loud music damages your hearing ­— a warning that we're used to taking as fact. But surprisingly, little research has actually been done into how sustained exposure to loud music affects our hearing in the long term, and the results we do have are far from conclusive. A new research project taking place at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) National Biomedical Research Unit in Hearing, based at The University of Nottingham, is the first to explicitly examine the effect of long-term exposure to loud music.

Art and Design - 14.06.2012
Uranium-series dating reveals Iberian paintings are Europe's oldest cave art
Uranium-series dating reveals Iberian paintings are Europe’s oldest cave art
Paleolithic paintings in El Castillo cave in Northern Spain date back at least 40,800 years - making them Europe's oldest known cave art, according to new research published today in Science. The practice of cave art in Europe thus began up to 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, indicating the paintings were created either by the first anatomically modern humans in Europe or, perhaps, by Neanderthals.

Art and Design - 13.06.2012
Music of kindness: playing together strengthens empathy in children
Music of kindness: playing together strengthens empathy in children
A year-long study on children's music-making indicates that playing music in groups on a regular basis greatly improves a child's ability to empathise with others.

History / Archeology - Art and Design - 01.04.2010
Hundred Years´ War manuscript gets new lease of life
Hundred Years´ War manuscript gets new lease of life
01 April 2010 Hundred Years´ War manuscript gets new lease of life A unique website showcasing virtual manuscripts chronicling the Hundred Years´ War will be launched online this month (2 April 2010) thanks to the work of academics at the University of Sheffield. The website, which was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and produced in conjunction with the University of Liverpool, will offer more than 100 transcriptions from the renowned Chronicles of Jehan Froissart, which provide a unique account of the epic battle between the English and the French.