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Health - Administration - 19.05.2011
Cell therapy aims to prevent transplant rejection
Cell therapy aims to prevent transplant rejection
A cell therapy that could prevent transplanted organs being rejected, and remove the need for prolonged use of immunosuppressant drugs, has shown promise in early-stage studies in mice. The approach would involve transplant patients being re-injected with their own immune cells after the cells have been isolated from a blood sample.

Administration - Health - 10.02.2011
Extra testosterone reduces your empathy
Extra testosterone reduces your empathy
A new study from Utrecht and Cambridge Universities has for the first time found that an administration of testosterone under the tongue in volunteers negatively affects a person's ability to 'mind read', an indication of empathy. In addition, the effects of testosterone administration are predicted by a fetal marker of prenatal testosterone, the 2D:4D ratio.

Health - Administration - 22.11.2010
Cholesterol drug shows benefits for kidney patients
Cholesterol drug shows benefits for kidney patients
A combination drug that lowers levels of 'bad' cholesterol in the blood can benefit people with chronic kidney disease and is safe, a study led by the Clinical Trial Service Unit at Oxford University has found. Patients receiving the daily pill - a combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe produced by Merck - had one-sixth fewer heart attacks, strokes or operations to unblock arteries than those receiving a placebo 'dummy' pill.

Health - Administration - 28.07.2010
Healthcare competition saves lives
Healthcare competition saves lives
Competition among hospitals saves patients? lives and decreases their overall length of stay in hospital, according to a new study involving researchers from the University of Bristol, who found there was no corresponding increase in overall expenditure. English NHS hospitals located in areas where patients have more choice had lower death rates and shorter patient stays than hospitals in less competitive areas.

Health - Administration - 10.06.2010
Hospital study shows increased mortality rate at the weekend compared to during the week
Hospital study shows increased mortality rate at the weekend compared to during the week
Researchers say higher than expected mortality rates may be linked to a decrease in the availability of senior hospital staff at the weekend - News Release For Immediate Release Friday 11 June 2010 People admitted to English hospitals in an emergency at the weekend have, on average, a seven percent higher mortality rate than people admitted between Monday and Friday, according to research published in the journal Quality & Safety in Health Care this week.

Health - Administration - 28.04.2010
Causes of death in AIDS patients
Causes of death in AIDS patients
New research shows that Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) continues to dramatically reduce rates of mortality from HIV infection in high-income countries, such that non-AIDS-related deaths exceed AIDS deaths after approximately four years of taking ART. The study, by researchers from the University of Bristol and a large group of international collaborators, examined data from the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) which involved nearly 40,000 patients who started ART between 1996 and 2006 in Europe and North America.

Administration - 25.03.2010
£5 billion a year for infrastructure and affordable housing comes from private developers
Researchers from the University of Sheffield have found that private developers have agreed to fund £5 billion of England´s local capital infrastructure, including roads, schools and new affordable housing in England. The research, which was commissioned by the Department of Communities & Local Government (CLG) and published today by CLG, shows planning obligations have led to the very substantial investments by developers.

Health - Administration - 23.03.2010
Improving health and lives for people with learning disabilities
Improving health and lives for people with learning disabilities
It is well known that people with learning disabilities have poorer health and die younger than other people. An investigation into the standards of care for people with learning disabilities was announced today [Tuesday 23 March] by the Department of Health . The Confidential Inquiry will find out what can be changed to improve the health of people with learning disabilities to enable them to live longer.

Health - Administration - 04.03.2010
Women's support groups improve newborn survival rates
Women’s support groups improve newborn survival rates
Women's community groups have had a dramatic effect on reducing neonatal mortality rates in some of the poorest areas on India, according to new UCL research. The study, published today in The Lancet , reports that the groups provide a cost-effective intervention with added benefits such as reducing significantly maternal depression and improving decision-making amongst the women.

Health - Administration - 03.03.2010
Project set to improve communication of stroke survivors
Stroke survivors in South Yorkshire are set to benefit from a unique project being launched by the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, which will aim to improve their communication skills. The CACTUS Project will assess whether people can improve their communication skills, regardless of the time since their stroke.

Agronomy / Food Science - Administration - 21.08.2009
Daylight could help control our weight
Daylight could help control our weight
PA 220/09 Exciting research into Brown adipose tissue (BAT) — brown fat, which is found in abundance in hibernating animals and newborn babies — could lead to new ways of preventing obesity. Studies have already shown that BAT activity in adults is reduced with obesity. Therefore, promoting BAT function could prevent or reduce obesity in some people.

Health - Administration - 05.08.2009
Cash Counts for Nothing in PCT Performance
The amount of money spent in delivering maternity care in Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) does not have a significant impact on rates of infant or perinatal mortality, researchers at the University of Birmingham have found. Nick Freemantle, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, found that between 70% and 80% of variations between PCT infant and perinatal mortality can be explained by a combination of social deprivation, ethnicity and maternal age.

Health - Administration - 07.05.2009
New research at the University of Sheffield may hold clue to early-onset Parkinson´s
The Parkinson ´s Disease Society (PDS) has announced funding of nearly £240,000 towards research at the University of Sheffield which will look into the possibility of slowing down the onset of Parkinson's disease. Dr Oliver Bandmann and his team at the University will focus on the gene PARK 2, as this is associated with an inherited form of Parkinson´s disease that strikes at an early age, but can also result in Parkinson´s disease presenting later in life.
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