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Health - 25.01.2022
Faulty BRCA genes linked to prostate and pancreatic cancers
Faulty BRCA genes linked to prostate and pancreatic cancers
Faulty versions of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are well known to increase the risk of breast cancer in men and women, and in ovarian cancer. Now BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been linked to several other cancers, including those that affect men.

Health - Social Sciences - 25.01.2022
Northerners’ hearing likely to be worse than Southerners
Northerners over 50 have a 13.5% higher prevalence of hearing loss than Southerners in England, reveal University of Manchester researchers. They examined socio-spatial patterns of hearing health among older adults in England, using objective hearing data of 8,263 participants aged 50-89 years old from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2022
More than a third of care home residents caught Covid-19 in early waves of pandemic
More than a third of care home residents caught Covid-19 in early waves of pandemic
More than a third of care home residents and a quarter of care home staff in England showed evidence of infection with SARS-CoV-2 during the first two waves of the pandemic, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity , looked at blood samples from nearly 5,000 residents (with a median age of 87) and staff (with a median age of 48) at 201 care homes across England between June 2020 and May 2021.

Health - 20.01.2022
Rates of short-sightedness increasing in the UK
Our changing environment, as well as changing gene-environment interactions, could explain increasing rates of short-sightedness over time in the UK, reports a new study led by UCL researchers. In a new paper published in PLOS One , researchers showed that, within the study, there were a higher number of people diagnosed with short-sightedness within the younger population than those born between 1939 and 1944.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2022
Harmful changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Harmful changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Harmful changes in supporting cells, called astrocytes, have been identified in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by UCL and Francis Crick Institute researchers. The two new publications, in Brain and Genome Research , suggests that the star-shaped astrocytes may be a key target for new ALS treatments.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.01.2022
New blood cancer gene defect can be treated with existing drugs
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email A defective gene normally found in blood cancers could be treated with drugs already available for cancers with similar gene defects, scientists at the University of Birmingham and Queen's University Belfast have revealed.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.01.2022
Review highlights risk factors associated with violence in schizophrenia
Review highlights risk factors associated with violence in schizophrenia
Researchers at Oxford University's Department of Psychiatry have found that people with schizophrenia and related disorders are at higher-than-average risk of perpetrating violence, but that the overall risk remains low (less than 1 in 20 in women, and less than 1 in 4 for men over a 35-year period for violent arrests and crimes).

Health - Psychology - 19.01.2022
Depression and anxiety rose sharply over Christmas in the UK
Depression and anxiety rose sharply over Christmas in the UK
Levels of depression and anxiety rose sharply over December in the UK, especially among young adults, reaching similar levels to lockdown at the start of 2021, according to new findings from the Covid-19 Social Study led by UCL researchers. The research also found that confidence in devolved governments' handling of Covid-19 fell in England and Wales over the same period (between the end of November and start of January), but remained steady in Scotland.

Health - Psychology - 18.01.2022
Study highlights importance of bonding between young mental health patients and nurses
The relationships between young mental health patients and the nurses looking after them is an overlooked treatment in its own right, according to new research. The qualitative study of eight young people, eight family members and eight nursing staff by psychologists from The University of Manchester and Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust is published in high profile journal PLOS ONE.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.01.2022
'Off target' effects of drugs used for autoimmune disorders needs better treatment strategy
’Off target’ effects of drugs used for autoimmune disorders needs better treatment strategy
New therapies for autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRDs) that are designed to better regulate lipid (fat) metabolism, could significantly reduce the harmful side-effects caused by conventional treatments, finds a new large-scale review led by UCL researchers. AIRDs affect millions globally and include rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and Sjögren's syndrome - all with high rates of morbidity.

Health - 17.01.2022
Curbing COVID-19 in schools: Cambridge scientists support CO2 monitor rollout
Curbing COVID-19 in schools: Cambridge scientists support CO2 monitor rollout
UK schools have received more than 300,000 CO2 monitors as part of a government initiative to reduce COVID-19 spread in classrooms. The monitors empower teachers to strike a balance between good ventilation and warmth during winter Paul Linden Scientists from Cambridge, Surrey and Imperial College London are supporting the rollout of portable monitors to UK schools as part of project CO-TRACE.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.01.2022
Link between brain cell development and risk of schizophrenia
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered new links between the breakdown in brain cell development and the risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Genetic risk factors are known to disrupt brain development in a number of these disorders, but little is known about which aspects of this process are affected.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.01.2022
Mosquitoes’ mating game discovery provides new clues to combat malaria
Male mosquitoes beat their wings faster when swarming at sunset to better detect females and increase their chance of reproducing, finds a novel study led by UCL scientists. Published in  Science Advances , the findings provide a vital new insight into how mosquitoes, driven by their internal circadian clock, combine changes in wing beats with their acute auditory senses to successfully mate.

Health - 13.01.2022
Face masks ’make wearers look more attractive’
Face masks. Two words that have prompted furious debate during the COVID-19 pandemic. The discussion just isn't going away - and now Cardiff University experts have discovered a surprising new reason to mask up. They have published new research which suggests protective face masks make wearers look more attractive.

Health - Social Sciences - 12.01.2022
New article on evidence and literature around COVID-19 and water demand
COVID-19 has had unprecedented impacts across the international community, with complex and far-reaching consequences. Measures to prevent transmission have led to substantial changes to everyday life, with lock-downs, stay-at-home orders and guidance lead This movement of activity has had profound impacts on daily practices, affecting the consumption of resources including water.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.01.2022
Simple screening for common lung disease could relieve millions globally
The global burden of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), a group of common lung conditions that affects more than 300* million people, could be significantly reduced with a simple health assessment, concludes a large-scale international study led by UCL researchers. COPD includes serious lung conditions, such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis, and is the world's third leading cause of morbidity with more than three million deaths a year.

Health - Computer Science - 07.01.2022
Diets: how scientists discovered that one size doesn't fit all
Diets: how scientists discovered that one size doesn’t fit all
If you ate too much over the festive season, you may well be thinking about a healthy diet plan for 2022. But as anyone who has ever dieted knows, there are countless options out there. Right now, we're in the midst of a revolutionary time for understanding the human body, and so the question arises: can new science tell us which diet plan is best for losing weight? Many diets originate in a system for rating foods according to the effect they have on our blood sugar level.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.01.2022
Smokers become lonelier than non-smokers as they get older
Smokers become lonelier than non-smokers as they get older
Smokers may become more socially isolated and lonely than non-smokers as they get older, according to a new study co-led by UCL researchers that suggests the idea of smoking as a sociable pastime may be a myth. Previous research has found that people who are isolated and lonely are more likely to smoke.

Health - 05.01.2022
Parasitic roundworm poses lung health threat to European men
Parasitic roundworm poses lung health threat to European men
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Young men exposed to parasitic roundworm may be at increased risk of developing asthma and serious lung damage, a new study reveals. Exposure to 'Ascaris lumbricoides' in Europe appears much higher than previously assumed, with young men exposed to the worms showing significant reduction in lung function and asthma nearly five times more often, as compared to those not exposed.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.01.2022
New test can identify if a patient has cancer and if it has spread
New test can identify if a patient has cancer and if it has spread
A publication by University of Oxford researchers describes a new minimally invasive and inexpensive blood test that can identify cancer in patients with non-specific symptoms. A University of Oxford study published in Clinical Cancer Research , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, outlines a new type of blood test that can be used to detect a range of cancers and whether these cancers have spread (metastasised) in the body.