news 2022

« BACK

Earth Sciences



Results 21 - 31 of 31.


Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 20.05.2022
Discovery of 'ghost' fossils reveals plankton resilience to past global warming events
Discovery of ’ghost’ fossils reveals plankton resilience to past global warming events
An international team of scientists from UCL, the Swedish Museum of Natural History, the University of Florence and Natural History Museum have found a remarkable type of fossilization that has remained almost entirely overlooked until now. The fossils are microscopic imprints, or "ghosts", of single-celled plankton, called coccolithophores, that lived in the seas millions of years ago, and their discovery is changing our understanding of how plankton in the oceans are affected by climate change.

Earth Sciences - 19.05.2022
Scientists 'see' puzzling features deep in Earth's interior
Scientists ’see’ puzzling features deep in Earth’s interior
New research led by the University of Cambridge is the first to obtain a detailed 'image' of an unusual pocket of rock at the boundary layer with Earth's core, some three thousand kilometres beneath the surface. Of all Earth's deep interior features, these are the most fascinating and complex Zhi Li The enigmatic area of rock, which is located almost directly beneath the Hawaiian Islands, is one of several ultra-low velocity zones - so-called because earthquake waves slow to a crawl as they pass through them.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 28.04.2022
Space-based system using GPS satellites could warn of incoming tsunamis
Space-based system using GPS satellites could warn of incoming tsunamis
A new method for detecting tsunamis using existing GPS satellites orbiting Earth could serve as an effective warning system for countries worldwide, according to a new study by an international team led by UCL researchers. Initial tsunami waves are typically a few centimetres high but nonetheless cause a disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere by pushing up air and creating an acoustic wave that is amplified as it goes higher.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 13.04.2022
Diverse life forms may have evolved earlier than previously thought
Diverse life forms may have evolved earlier than previously thought
Diverse microbial life existed on Earth at least 3.75 billion years ago, suggests a new study led by UCL researchers that challenges the conventional view of when life began. For the study, published in Science Advances , the research team analysed a fist-sized rock from Quebec, Canada, estimated to be between 3.75 and 4.28 billion years old.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 08.03.2022
Core aspects of climate models are sound - the proof's in the plankton
Core aspects of climate models are sound - the proof’s in the plankton
Continents reconfigure, oceans shift, and ice sheets thicken and thaw, but for the past 95 million years Earth's engine for distributing ocean heat has remained remarkably consistent, a new study co-led by UCL has found. The study, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , and led by Yale University, offered a novel way of examining plankton shells to better gauge the accuracy of climate models and the Earth's temperature gradients.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.02.2022
Biodiversity is facing the repayment of debts and credits
Biodiversity is facing the repayment of debts and credits
A new method suggests that past landscape changes can cast a shadow on future bird biodiversity, leading to avian communities facing impeding species extinctions, as well as the arrival of new colonising species. The study revealed widespread extinction debts and colonisation credits in USA bird biodiversity.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 09.02.2022
Seismometer technology field-tested in Antarctica before space missions
Seismometer technology field-tested in Antarctica before space missions
Scientists from the University of Oxford are field-testing seismic sensors in the bitter conditions of Antarctica to simulate the solar system's icy moons. The Antarctic deployment is the first in what is hoped to be a series of extreme environment tests for the short-period (SP) sensor - a seismometer that records the high-frequency (high pitched) seismic waves generated by movement in the ice sheets.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 03.02.2022
New research uncovers ancient Martian meteorite’s shocking history
Planetary scientists from the University of Glasgow have lent their support to an important new study of a Martian meteorite. The research, led by Curtin University in Australia, has found the first physical evidence of high-intensity damage caused by asteroid impact in ancient Martian meteorites, which could help identify when conditions suitable for life may have existed on early Mars.

Earth Sciences - 31.01.2022
Scientists identify geological ’Goldilocks zone’ for the formation of metal ore deposits
Scientists have identified a mechanism through which important metals, crucial to the manufacturing of renewable energy technologies, are passed from the Earth's mantle to the crust. The team, including researchers from Cardiff University, has discovered a 'Goldilocks zone' at the base of the Earth's crust where the temperate is just right at around 1000°C for metals to be transported to shallower levels near the surface, where they can be mined.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.01.2022
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Swirling river waters can trap lightweight microplastics that otherwise might be expected to float - depositing them in riverbeds where it can take up to seven years to transport them just a kilometre further towards the ocean, a new study reveals. As rivers are in near-constant motion, researchers had previously assumed that lightweight microplastics were swept rather swiftly towards the ocean and rarely interacted with riverbed sediments.

Earth Sciences - 12.01.2022
SUERC contributes to new study dating earliest human remains in eastern Africa
The age of the oldest fossils in eastern Africa widely recognised as representing our species, Homo sapiens, has long been uncertain. Now, dating of a massive volcanic eruption in Ethiopia reveals they are much older than previously thought. The remains - known as Omo I - were found in Ethiopia in the late 1960s, and scientists have been attempting to date them precisely ever since, by using the chemical fingerprints of volcanic ash layers found above and below the sediments in which the fossils were found.