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Results 61 - 80 of 758.


Life Sciences - Environment - 28.11.2022
Live fast, avoid extinction: fast-lived species more resilient to human influences
Live fast, avoid extinction: fast-lived species more resilient to human influences
Animals that live fast - that is, frequent or abundant reproduction and short lifespans - are more resilient to human-driven land use changes than those with slow life-histories, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. Across the globe, in areas that have experienced rapid expansion of cropland or bare soil, fast-lived species have increased in numbers in recent decades while slow-lived species are in decline, according to the findings published in Global Change Biology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.11.2022
Mussel survey reveals alarming degradation of River Thames ecosystem since the 1960s
Mussel survey reveals alarming degradation of River Thames ecosystem since the 1960s
Scientists replicated a 1964 River Thames survey and found that mussel numbers have declined by almost 95%, with one species - the depressed river mussel - completely gone. This dramatic decline in native mussel populations is very worrying, and we are not sure what's driving it David Aldridge The detailed study measured the change in size and number of all species of mussel in a stretch of the River Thames near Reading between 1964 and 2020.

Chemistry - Earth Sciences - 24.11.2022
Possible organic compounds found in Mars crater rocks
Possible organic compounds found in Mars crater rocks
Rock samples from the Jezero crater analysed by the Perseverance rover show evidence of liquid water and signatures that could be organic compounds. A study published in Science analyses multiple rocks found at the bottom of Jezero Crater on Mars, where the Perseverance rover landed in 2020, revealing significant interaction between the rocks and liquid water.

Environment - 24.11.2022
Intensive grassland management hampers the recovery of soil food webs from drought
New research led by a team of scientists from The University of Manchester has shown that intensive grassland management impairs the capacity of soils to buffer extreme droughts, which are becoming more frequent and intense. The study investigated how management of grasslands across northern England modifies the transfer of recently photosynthesised carbon by plants to roots and soil organisms and the transfer of soil nitrogen to plant and soil organisms following a severe drought.

Environment - 24.11.2022
Low-traffic neighbourhoods reduce pollution in surrounding streets
Low-traffic neighbourhoods reduce pollution in surrounding streets
Low-traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs) reduce traffic and air pollution without displacing the problem to nearby streets, new research has shown. The study by researchers at Imperial College London looked at three LTNs in London, to identify their impact on both air pollution and traffic within the LTN zones and in the surrounding area.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 24.11.2022
Shock waves trigger black holes' powerful jets
Shock waves trigger black holes’ powerful jets
Powerful jets of material released by black holes are accelerated far into space by shock waves within the jets, an international collaboration involving UCL researchers has found. The study, published in Nature , helps to solve a decades-old mystery about how these jets are produced. The research team was able to rule out alternative causes of the jets - such as magnetic reconnection - and, out of a number of theoretical models of how the particles in the jets are accelerated, showed that just one model was correct.

Social Sciences - 23.11.2022
Young people’s wellbeing falls sharply after starting secondary school
Most young people in the UK experience a sharp decline in their wellbeing during their first years at secondary school regardless of their circumstances or background, according to new research published in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology . Academics from the Universities of Manchester and Cambridge analysed the wellbeing and self-esteem of more than 11,000 young people from across the UK, using data collected when they were 11 and again when they were 14.

Sport - 23.11.2022
Combining mental and physical training may improve footballers' World Cup performance
Combining mental and physical training may improve footballers’ World Cup performance
Footballers must stay on top of their game mentally or risk a drop in physical performance. Combining physical and mental training could help them play better. Combining physical training with mentally fatiguing tasks could help professional footballers play better and concede fewer goals during major tournaments such as the FIFA World Cup, a new study reveals.

Architecture - 23.11.2022
Greenest city centres in Great Britain revealed
Researchers analysed 68 city centres across England, Scotland and Wales ranking them on tree cover, vegetation and parks in the heart of the city centres The top five greenest city centres are all in the South of England (Exeter, Islington, Bristol, Bournemouth Cambridge) This is the first study of its kind to focus specifically on the heart of city centres, as opposed to prior studies which have measured greenness of whole cities, including bro

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 22.11.2022
New era of exoplanet exploration begins with 'remarkable' JWST study of WASP-39b
New era of exoplanet exploration begins with ’remarkable’ JWST study of WASP-39b
Studies of one exoplanet's atmosphere using James Webb Space Telescope instruments have revealed the detection of new molecules and cloud structures. In a suite of studies across five papers, a large international team including Imperial College London researchers has demonstrated the power of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for investigating exoplanets.

Physics - Chemistry - 22.11.2022
Can a new technique for capturing 'hot' electrons make solar cells more efficient?
Can a new technique for capturing ’hot’ electrons make solar cells more efficient?
A Bath discovery opens a new route for measuring and controlling hot electrons. The hope is that more energy will be available to power solar cells. A new way of extracting quantitative information from state-of-the-art single molecule experiments has been developed by physicists at the University of Bath.

Environment - 22.11.2022
Views wanted ahead of Bristol’s Clean Air Zone
Psychologists want to hear from people who live, work, or regularly travel into Bristol, in advance of the City's Clean Air Zone coming into force on Monday. Researchers at the University of Bath want to hear from people living or working in Bristol ahead of the City's Clean Air Zone (CAZ), which is being introduced on Monday 28 November.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.11.2022
New study brings personalised immunotherapy prescriptions a step closer
New study brings personalised immunotherapy prescriptions a step closer
Research validates an imaging platform co-developed at CTI-Bath which predicts if a cancer patient would respond well to immunotherapy. In a step likely to advance personalised cancer treatment, scientists have for the first time shown in patients that levels of biomarkers are not enough to tell which patients are likely to respond best to immunotherapy.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2022
Hospitals more risky than farms when it comes to Klebsiella superbug spread, says study
Hospitals more risky than farms when it comes to Klebsiella superbug spread, says study
A study led by Bath's Milner Centre for Evolution investigated spread of Klebsiella bacteria between humans and the environment. An international team of scientists investigating transmission of a deadly drug resistant bacteria that rivals MRSA, has found that whilst the bugs are found in livestock, pets and the wider environment, they are rarely transmitted to humans through this route.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2022
New Alzheimer’s genes discovered in world’s largest study
Two new genes that raise a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease have been discovered by researchers. An international team, involving Cardiff University's Dementia Research Institute, compared 32,000 genetic codes from patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy individuals. The research uncovered several new genes and specific mutations in those genes that lead to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

History / Archeology - Environment - 18.11.2022
Let them eat stew: University of Glasgow research sheds new light on foodways in the first cities
Let them eat stew: University of Glasgow research sheds new light on foodways in the first cities
The world's first urban state societies developed in Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, some 5500 years ago. No other artefact type is more symbolic of this development than the so-called Beveled Rim Bowl (BRB), the first mass produced ceramic bowl. BRB function and what food(s) these bowls contained has been the subject of debate for over a century.

Astronomy / Space - Computer Science - 18.11.2022
Worldwide dataset captures Earth in finest ever detail
Worldwide dataset captures Earth in finest ever detail
A global open-source dataset of high-resolution images of Earth - the most extensive and detailed of its kind - has been developed by experts led by UCL with data from the European Space Agency (ESA). The free dataset, WorldStrat, will be presented at the NeurIPS 2022 conference in New Orleans. It includes nearly 10,000km˛ of free satellite images, showing every type of location, urban area and land use from agriculture, grasslands and forests to cities of every size and polar ice caps.

Health - Physics - 18.11.2022
Fusion surprises and COVID scars: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From research into how ions behave in fusion reactions, to a study on why some people develop scar tissue in their lungs following severe COVID-19 infection, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Fusion surprises Ions may behave differently in fusion reactions than previously expected, providing important insights for the future design of a laser-fusion energy source.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.11.2022
Sea level rise to dramatically speed up erosion of rock coastlines by 2100
Rock coasts, which make up over half the world's coastlines, could retreat more rapidly in the future due to accelerating sea level rise. This is according to new research led by Imperial College London and supported by researchers from the University of Glasgow. The researchers modelled likely future cliff retreat rates of two rock coasts in the UK, based on forecasts of sea level rise for different greenhouse gas emissions and climate change scenarios.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.11.2022
Lab grown 'mini eyes' help understanding of blindness in rare genetic condition
Lab grown ’mini eyes’ help understanding of blindness in rare genetic condition
Researchers at UCL have grown 'mini eyes', which make it possible to study and better understand the development of blindness in Usher syndrome for the first time. The 3D 'mini eyes', known as organoids, were grown from stem cells generated from skin samples donated by patients at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (GOSH).