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Health - Life Sciences - 07.11.2022
Personalising whole genome sequencing doubles diagnosis of rare diseases
Personalising whole genome sequencing doubles diagnosis of rare diseases
Tailoring the analysis of whole genome sequencing to individual patients could double the diagnostic rates of rare diseases, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. In 2018, the UK's department of health announced an NHS Genomic Medicine Service, which allows patients with rare diseases to have their entire genetic code read in the hope of providing a much-needed diagnosis.

Social Sciences - 07.11.2022
New report reveals link between online and offline violence against women journalists
New report is calling for urgent action by UK policymakers to tackle online violence towards women journalists Report is based on International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and University of Sheffield research commissioned by UNESCO, revealing a strong link between online and offline violence in the UK, particularly stalking Research finds women journalists in the UK are at the nexus of misogyny, racism, xenophobia and religious bigotry online,

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.11.2022
Rethinking mountain water security
Water security in mountain regions relies on an understanding of the interlinks of water supply and demand that goes far beyond the study of glacier melt. Current information on how the communities which depend on water from mountain snow and ice will be affected by climate change is limited, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability.

Health - 04.11.2022
Substance use disorders linked to poor health outcomes in wide range of physical health conditions
People who have a past history of hospitalisation because of substance use disorders have much worse outcomes following the onset of a wide range of physical health conditions, according to researchers in the UK and Czechia.

Health - Psychology - 03.11.2022
Problem drinking linked to increased risk of suicide and self-harm
Problem drinking linked to increased risk of suicide and self-harm
Problematic alcohol use is associated with increased odds of suicide or self-harm, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in BJPsych Open , did not identify a clear association with levels of alcohol consumption and risk of suicide or self-harm, other than among those with 'probable dependence' (the highest consumption level); rather, they identified signs of alcohol negatively impacting people's lives as risk factors.

History / Archeology - Health - 03.11.2022
Five things science has told us about the mummy of Tutankhamun
Five things science has told us about the mummy of Tutankhamun
One hundred years ago, our understanding of ancient Egypt changed forever when the tomb of King Tutankhamun was found on November 4, 1922 in the Valley of Kings. Born around 1305 BC, Tutankhamun only ruled Egypt for about ten years. Yet his tomb was furnished with never-before-seen riches. Our fascination with mummies is understandable.

Linguistics / Literature - 03.11.2022
James Bond's ethnicity might change - but his accent probably won't
James Bond’s ethnicity might change - but his accent probably won’t

Physics - Astronomy / Space - 03.11.2022
Magnetism could help explain Earth’s formation
A peculiar property of the Earth's magnetic field could help us to work out how our planet was created 4.5 billion years ago, according to a new scientific assessment. There are several theories about how the Earth and the Moon were formed, most involving a giant impact. They vary from a model where the impacting object strikes the newly formed Earth a glancing blow and then escapes, through to one where the collision is so energetic that both the impactor and the Earth are vaporized.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 03.11.2022
Can cosmic inflation be ruled out?
Can cosmic inflation be ruled out?
Astrophysicists say that cosmic inflation - a point in the Universe's infancy when space-time expanded exponentially, and what physicists really refer to when they talk about the -Big Bang can in principle be ruled out in an assumption-free way. Is it possible in principle to test cosmic inflation in a model-independent way? Sunny Vagnozzi The astrophysicists, from the University of Cambridge, the University of Trento, and Harvard University, say that there is a clear, unambiguous signal in the cosmos which could eliminate inflation as a possibility.

Physics - Astronomy / Space - 03.11.2022
Magnetised dead star likely has solid surface
Magnetised dead star likely has solid surface
A signature in the X-ray light emitted by a highly magnetised dead star known as a magnetar suggests the star has a solid surface with no atmosphere, according to a new study by an international collaboration co-led by UCL researchers. The study, published in the journal Science , uses data from a NASA satellite, the Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE), which was launched last December.

Environment - 03.11.2022
Drought across Africa
Drought across Africa
Vast swathes of Africa have experienced more frequent and intense episodes of drought since 1983, new research has uncovered. Research commissioned by WaterAid saw Cardiff University expert Professor Michael Singer join forces with colleagues from the University of Bristol to shine a new light on trends in East Africa, Southern Africa and Central Africa.

Paleontology - History / Archeology - 02.11.2022
Prehistoric reptile casts turn out to be copies of priceless fossil destroyed in WWII
Scientists find copies of lost fossil destroyed in WWII hiding in a US museum. The world's first complete skeleton of a prehistoric reptile brought to the attention of science was discovered a little over 200 years ago and named ' Proteosaurus '. Unfortunately, that fossil was destroyed in an air raid in May 1941, during WWII, with no copies thought to exist.

Health - 02.11.2022
Two fifths of people have chronic pain by their 40s, with consequences for later life
Two fifths of people have chronic pain by their 40s, with consequences for later life
Chronic pain is widespread among those in their mid-40s in Britain, with those who experience it more likely to report pain, poor health - including COVID-19 infection - and joblessness later in life, according to a new study by researchers at UCL and Dartmouth College, US. Published today in the journal PLOS ONE , the research follows more than 12,000 people born in a single week in March 1958 in Britain through to age 62.

Environment - 02.11.2022
Congo peatlands could emit billions of tonnes of carbon in drier climate
Congo peatlands could emit billions of tonnes of carbon in drier climate
The Congo peatlands turned from a major store of carbon to a source of carbon dioxide emissions thousands of years ago due to a drying climate, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. , the study highlights the potential of the Congo peatlands - the largest tropical peatland in the world - to again release billions of tonnes of stored carbon into the atmosphere in a future warmer world.

Health - 02.11.2022
Monitoring for ovarian cancer is beneficial for high-risk women
Monitoring for ovarian cancer is beneficial for high-risk women
Regularly monitoring women with BRCA gene alterations associated with cancer can benefit their future health, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene alterations are known to greatly increase a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer. Preventative surgery to remove the ovaries and fallopian tubes is currently the only way to avoid the disease.

Environment - History / Archeology - 02.11.2022
Congo peatlands could release billions of tonnes of carbon
Congo peatlands could release billions of tonnes of carbon
The world's largest tropical peatland turned from being a major store of carbon to a source of carbon dioxide emissions as a result of climate change thousands of years ago, new research has revealed. Around the time that Stonehenge was built, 5,000 years ago, the climate of central Congo began to dry, leading to the peatlands emitting carbon dioxide.

Health - 01.11.2022
Pancreatic cancer could be diagnosed up to three years earlier
Pancreatic cancer could be identified in patients up to three years earlier than current diagnoses, new research suggests. Weight loss and increasing blood glucose levels are early indicators of pancreatic cancer and could lead to a more timely diagnosis, helping to improve survival rates.

Religions - Environment - 01.11.2022
Catholic Church can curb carbon emissions by returning to meat-free Fridays
Catholic Church can curb carbon emissions by returning to meat-free Fridays
Even a small dietary change by a minority of UK Catholics had significant environmental benefits, say researchers, who argue that a papal decree reinstating meatless Fridays across the global church would save millions of tonnes of carbon a year. If the Pope was to reinstate the obligation for meatless Fridays to all Catholics globally, it could be a major source of low-cost emissions reductions Shaun Larcom In 2011, the Catholic bishops of England and Wales called on congregations to return to foregoing meat on Fridays.

Health - 01.11.2022
Experts pave the way for safer surgery to address global elective waiting lists
Experts pave the way for safer surgery to address global elective waiting lists
New research will help to provide safer surgery for thousands of patients around the world - particularly in Lowand Middle-income Countries (LMIC). Surgical care experts have unveiled two studies in The Lancet that will help to provide safer surgery for thousands of patients around the world - particularly in Lowand Middle-income Countries (LMIC).

Health - Pharmacology - 01.11.2022
Best blood thinner for minimising bleeding risk identified
A large-scale comparison of direct oral anticoagulants (blood thinners), commonly prescribed for irregular heartbeats, has identified the drug with the lowest risk of bleeding, in a new study led by UCL researchers. In the paper published in Annals of Internal Medicine , the researchers report that one of the two most common direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), apixaban, has the lowest risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, with similar performance on stroke prevention and other side effects.
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