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Health - Career - 10.11.2021
New target for Covid-19 vaccines identified
Next generation vaccines for Covid-19 should aim to induce an immune response against 'replication proteins', essential for the very earliest stages of the viral cycle, concludes new research carried out by UCL scientists. By designing vaccines that activate immune memory cells, known as T cells, to attack infected cells expressing this part of the virus's internal machinery, it may be possible to eliminate SARS-CoV-2 at the very outset, thereby helping stop its spread.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.11.2021
School not key factor in rising levels of poor mental health in teenagers
Significant increases seen in teenagers' mental ill-health during secondary school is mostly likely linked to growing older, rather than academic and peer pressures associated with being in a more senior year group, finds a new study of over 40,000 young people led by UCL. Published in the British Educational Research Journal, the study provides one of the most detailed investigations into the link between mental health and school year, and finds mental ill-health is particularly prevalent among girls during secondary education.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.11.2021
New clues for the shared origins of irritable bowel syndrome and mental health disorders | University of Cambridge
New clues for the shared origins of irritable bowel syndrome and mental health disorders | University of Cambridge
Large-scale genetic study reveals new clues for the shared origins of irritable bowel syndrome and mental health disorders An international study of more than 50,000 people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has revealed that IBS symptoms may be caused by the same biological processes as conditions such as anxiety.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.11.2021
Researchers uncover gene that doubles risk of death from COVID-19
Researchers uncover gene that doubles risk of death from COVID-19
Scientists at Oxford University have identified the gene responsible for doubling the risk of respiratory failure from COVID-19. Sixty percent of people with South Asian ancestry carry the high-risk genetic signal, partly explaining the excess deaths seen in some UK communities, and the impact of COVID-19 in the Indian subcontinent.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.11.2021
Non-invasive ventilation for COVID-19 patients isn’t linked to heightened infection risk
New research carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has found that the use of non-invasive breathing support to treat patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 in hospitals isn't linked to a heightened risk of transmitting infection to others as currently thought.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.11.2021
Whole genome sequencing increases diagnosis of rare disorders by nearly a third, study finds | University of Cambridge
Whole genome sequencing increases diagnosis of rare disorders by nearly a third, study finds | University of Cambridge
Whole Genome Sequencing from a single blood test picks up 31% more cases of rare genetic disorders than standard tests, shortening the 'diagnostic odyssey' affected families experience and providing huge opportunities for future research. A definitive genetic diagnosis can really help patients and their families Patrick Chinnery Mitochondrial disorders affect around 1 in 4300 people and cause progressive, incurable diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.11.2021
Vital new insights into deadly African sleeping sickness disease
A newly published extensive body of research into Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, has revealed new insights into the deadly parasitic disease that threatens the lives of millions of people in 36 sub-Saharan African countries.

Health - Physics - 04.11.2021
Brightest ever X-ray shows lung vessels altered by Covid-19
The damage caused by Covid-19 to the lungs' smallest blood vessels has been intricately captured using high-energy X-rays emitted by a special type of particle accelerator. Scientists from UCL and the European Synchrotron Research Facility (ESRF) used a new revolutionary imaging technology called Hierarchical Phase-Contrast Tomography (HiP-CT), to scan donated human organs, including lungs from a Covid-19 donor.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.11.2021
Our brain uses nutritional state to regulate growth and age at puberty | University of Cambridge
Our brain uses nutritional state to regulate growth and age at puberty | University of Cambridge
Cambridge scientists have discovered how a receptor in the brain, called MC3R, detects the nutritional state of the body and regulates the timing of puberty and rate of growth in children and increases in lean muscle mass. This discovery shows how the brain can sense nutrients and interpret this to make subconscious decisions that influence our growth and sexual development Sir Stephen O'Rahilly These findings may explain how humans have been growing taller and reaching sexual maturity earlier over the past century.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.11.2021
Three days of antibiotics is 'safe and effective' for children leaving hospital with pneumonia
Three days of antibiotics is ’safe and effective’ for children leaving hospital with pneumonia
Children being discharged from hospital with pneumonia can be treated with three days of antibiotics rather than seven, finds a large UK-wide trial led by UCL. The results of the multi-site CAP-IT trial, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association , show that the number of doses given to children at home can be reduced safely, without impacting recovery.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.11.2021
Novel drug liberates tumour vessels to aid cancer drug delivery
Novel drug liberates tumour vessels to aid cancer drug delivery
A therapeutic antibody developed by scientists at UCL has been shown to unblock and normalise blood vessels inside cancerous tumours, enabling the more effective delivery of targeted cancer treatments. The findings in mice, published in the journal  MED , are the first to demonstrate that inhibiting the activity of LRG1, a protein produced in many tumorous tissues, liberates disorganised angiogenesis (blood vessel formation) - a leading cause of morbidity in numerous diseases including cancer.

Health - 02.11.2021
Attitudes to death and dying in UK
Most people believe it is important to plan care preferences in advance of dying but very few have taken any action, according to new research led by Cardiff University's Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Centre. Researchers analysed survey data from 8,077 adults across the UK to understand attitudes to death and dying, including what people understand of palliative and end of life care and willingness to discuss plans.

Health - 01.11.2021
Concerning trends around self-harm across Greater Manchester
The number of people seeking help for self-harm in primary care (for example from their GP), dropped sharply during the first UK lockdown in 2020. By May 2021 this deficit had not returned to pre-pandemic levels, according to new research that analysed the electronic health care records in primary care of 2.8 million people across Greater Manchester.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.11.2021
’Promising’ new way to predict older mums’ pregnancy risks revealed
Scientists have revealed new ways of calculating older mums' personal risk of serious pregnancy problems like having stillborn, premature, or very small babies. The Manchester Advanced Maternal Age Study (MAMAS) was led by Alex Heazell, Professor of Obstetrics at The University of Manchester and Honorary Consultant Obstetrician at Saint Mary's Hospital (SMH) - part of Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust (MFT) - with funding from Tommy's charity.

Health - 01.11.2021
Honeybees use social distancing to protect themselves against parasites
Honeybees increase social distancing when their hive is under threat from a parasite, finds a new study led by an international team involving researchers at UCL and the University of Sassari, Italy. The study, published in Science Advances , demonstrated that honeybee colonies respond to infestation from a harmful mite by modifying the use of space and the interactions between nestmates to increase the social distance between young and old bees.

Health - 01.11.2021
Exercise during lockdown fell particularly for groups most at risk
· During the COVID-19 March-June 2020 lockdown in the UK everyone was encouraged to stay at home and only leave the house once a day to exercise · A study of UK residents has found that groups including those who are BAME, obese and/or city dwellers reported a greater reduction in physical activity during the lockdown than other groups · The research highlights the need for targeted interventions to ensure that physical and mental health impacts

Health - Life Sciences - 29.10.2021
Cause of Alzheimer's progression in the brain | University of Cambridge
Cause of Alzheimer’s progression in the brain | University of Cambridge
For the first time, researchers have used human data to quantify the speed of different processes that lead to Alzheimer's disease and found that it develops in a very different way than previously thought. Their results could have important implications for the development of potential treatments.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.10.2021
Scientists link genes to condition which causes hearing loss and infertility
New research led by Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust and The University of Manchester could revolutionise the diagnosis and treatment for people with Perrault syndrome, a rare genetic condition resulting in hearing loss in men and women, and early menopause or infertility in women. The research, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics , was funded by organisations including, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Manchester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) , Action Medical Research and The Royal National Institute for Deaf People (RNID) .

Pharmacology - Health - 27.10.2021
Triple-drug combo could prove key weapon in fight against cancer
Triple-drug combo could prove key weapon in fight against cancer
Combining three existing drugs - a commonly-used anti-epileptic, a contraceptive steroid and a cholesterol-lowering agent - could form an effective and non-toxic treatment for a range of aggressive blood cancers, a new study reveals. The discovery by University of Birmingham scientists has led to a £1 million funding award from Blood Cancer UK to run a randomised clinical trial to test the new drug combo against another experimental agent (Danazol) in patients living with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS).

Health - 26.10.2021
Urgent changes needed to global guidelines designed to stop surgical infection
Urgent changes needed to global guidelines designed to stop surgical infection
Wound infections are the most common problem after surgery, particularly in developing countries, but promised innovations to tackle the issue do not work and global guidance needs changing, a new study reveals. Both World Health Organisation (WHO) and the UK's National Institute of Health Research guidelines recommend that surgeons use alcoholic chlorhexidine skin preparation and triclosan coated sutures to prevent Surgical Site Infection (SSI).