news 2021

« BACK

Environment



Results 61 - 80 of 131.


Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.04.2021
UofG experts contribute to climate change briefing paper
Researchers from the University of Glasgow have contributed their expertise to a new report on how nature-based solutions could help nations mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change. Professor Nick Hanley and Professor Larissa Naylor are among the authors of Nature-based Solutions for Climate Change, People and Biodiversity , a briefing paper released Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine by the COP26 Universities Network.

Environment - 28.04.2021
Is forest harvesting increasing in Europe?
Is forest harvesting increasing in Europe? Yes, but not as much as reported last July in a controversial study published in Nature . The study, titled 'Abrupt increase in harvested forest area over Europe after 2015', used satellite data to assess forest cover and claimed an abrupt increase of 69% in the harvested forest in Europe from 2016.

Economics / Business - Environment - 22.04.2021
Survey reveals many people have reservations about flying in future
More than half of adults plan to fly less or much less, even after they have been vaccinated against COVID-19, citing worries about the virus and climate change, according to a survey carried out by the University of Bristol The snapshot survey , conducted by researchers at the university's Cabot Institute for the Environment, captured views of nearly 500 respondents about how they might fly in the wake of the global pandemic.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.04.2021
Managing peatlands to cut greenhouse gas emissions
Managing peatlands to cut greenhouse gas emissions
Substantial cuts in global greenhouse gas emissions could be achieved by raising water levels in agricultural peatlands, according to a new study. Peatlands occupy just three per cent of the world’s land surface area but store a similar amount of carbon to all terrestrial vegetation, as well as supporting unique biodiversity.

Health - Environment - 12.04.2021
Volcanic pollution link to respiratory disease increase
Volcanic pollution link to respiratory disease increase
Respiratory disease increased markedly following one of Iceland's largest volcanic eruptions, a new study has found. The findings could have significant implications for actions taken to protect the health of the 800 million people living near active volcanoes. Only last month, lava burst through a crack in Iceland’s Mount Fagradalsfjall in the first eruption of its type for more than 800 years.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.04.2021
We don't know how most mammals will respond to climate change
We don’t know how most mammals will respond to climate change
Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals. In their systematic review, published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the scientists identify that there are significant blanks about the risks to mammals in regions most vulnerable to climate change, including boreal and tropic areas.

Environment - Pharmacology - 01.04.2021
Citizen scientists urged to get out into nature to support bee-spotting project this Easter
Citizen scientists are being encouraged to escape the house and help University scientists in their quest to track bees this Easter. As lockdown restrictions ease across Wales, scientists at Cardiff University are asking the public to take part in a biodiversity monitoring project called Spot-a-bee.

Environment - 31.03.2021
Lakes on Greenland Ice Sheet can drain huge amounts of water, even in winter
Lakes on Greenland Ice Sheet can drain huge amounts of water, even in winter
Using satellite data to 'see in the dark', researchers have shown for the first time that lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet drain during winter, a finding with implications for the speed at which the world's second-largest ice sheet flows to the ocean.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.03.2021
African elephants only occupy a fraction of their potential range | University of Oxford
African elephants only occupy a fraction of their potential range | University of Oxford
Many wildlife species are threatened by shrinking habitat. But according to new research published today, the potential range of African elephants could be more than five times larger than its current extent. Because of human pressure over the last two millenia, African elephants have suffered dramatic population declines, and their range has shrunk to just 17 percent of what it could be, say researchers - including members of Oxford University's Department of Zoology - behind the new study in Current Biology .

Environment - 31.03.2021
Extra 100 million years before Earth saw permanent oxygen rise
Extra 100 million years before Earth saw permanent oxygen rise
The permanent rise of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere, which fundamentally changed the subsequent nature of Earth's habitability, occurred much later than thought, according to new research. And the study, from an international team led by the University of Leeds and including researchers from the University of California-Riverside, Harvard University, the University of Southern Denmark and the University of St Andrews, also provides an explanation for some of the most extreme climate episodes to have affected the Earth, when the planet was repeatedly covered with ice.

Environment - 30.03.2021
Centuries-old trees may be at risk of climate change death
Centuries-old trees may be at risk of climate change death
Giant trees in tropical forests, witnesses to centuries of civilization, may be trapped in a dangerous feedback loop, according to a new report. The biggest trees store half of the carbon in mature tropical forests, but they could be at risk of death as a result of climate change—releasing massive amounts of carbon back into the atmosphere.

Chemistry - Environment - 30.03.2021
Researchers aim to reduce emissions of process which feeds 40% of the world
A new research project is setting out to investigate how to make an industrial process which helps feed nearly half the world's population more sustainable. The Haber-Bosch process, developed in the early 20th Century, was the first economically-viable large-scale ammonia production process. It works by combining nitrogen and hydrogen under high pressures, with the addition of an iron-based catalyst which helps the process work at a moderate temperature.

Health - Environment - 30.03.2021
Emergence of Lyme disease on treeless islands in Scotland
Lyme disease has the potential to emerge in a wider range of habitats than previously thought, suggests University of Liverpool and University of Glasgow research. A new study, published in Emerging Infectious Diseases found that open, treeless habitats can support similar densities of infected ticks as woodland in the UK, challenging established knowledge of which habitats present the most disease risk.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 29.03.2021
Scientists zero in on the role of volcanoes in the demise of dinosaurs
Scientists zero in on the role of volcanoes in the demise of dinosaurs
Researchers have uncovered evidence suggesting that volcanic carbon emissions were not a major driver in Earth's most recent extinction event. Even though volcanic carbon emissions alone couldn't have triggered the mass extinction, our data highlights their influence on our planet's climate and habitability Sally Gibson Earth has experienced five major extinction events over the last 500 million years, the fifth and most recent responsible for wiping out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.03.2021
Snappy evolution was behind the success of ancient crocodiles
Snappy evolution was behind the success of ancient crocodiles
New research led by the University of Bristol has revealed that crocodiles once flourished on land and in the oceans as a result of fast evolution. Modern crocodiles are predators living in rivers, lakes and wetlands, grabbing fish, reptiles, birds and mammals with their conspicuous snouts and powerful jaws.

Environment - Health - 23.03.2021
150+ UK-China scientists confirm Beijing's air quality has improved significantly
150+ UK-China scientists confirm Beijing’s air quality has improved significantly
Top UK and Chinese scientists studying air pollution in the megacity of Beijing and how it affects human health have published their. A team of over 150 scientists have spent five years conducting one of the largest air pollution field campaigns in Beijing - generating new insight into air pollution and human health using novel observational and modelling tools.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.03.2021
Seafloor nutrient vital in global food chain
Seafloor nutrient vital in global food chain
Eroded seabed rocks are providing an essential source of nutrition for drifting marine organisms at the base of the food chain, according to new research. The findings, led by the University, show that iron – an essential nutrient for microscopic marine algae known as phytoplankton – is being released from sediments on the deep ocean floor.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.03.2021
Global biodiversity awareness tracked with Wikipedia page views
Wikipedia page views could be used to monitor global awareness of biodiversity, proposes a research team from UCL, ZSL, and the RSPB. Using their new metric, the research team found that awareness of biodiversity is marginally increasing, but the rate of change varies greatly between different groups of animals, as they report in paper included in a special edition of Conversation Biology .

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.03.2021
Lack of prey is causing puffin chicks to starve leading to population declines | University of Oxford
Lack of prey is causing puffin chicks to starve leading to population declines | University of Oxford
New research from the 's Department of Zoology has used innovative technology to study causes of declines in puffin populations in the northeast Atlantic, and found that a lack of prey near some major breeding colonies is driving puffin chicks to starve, ultimately leading to population declines. Puffin populations, especially in the northeast Atlantic, have been in decline for decades.

Environment - 19.03.2021
Carbon uptake in re-growing Amazon forest threatened by climate and human disturbance
Carbon uptake in re-growing Amazon forest threatened by climate and human disturbance
Large areas of forests regrowing in the Amazon to help reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are being limited by climate and human activity. Large areas of forests regrowing in the Amazon to help reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are being limited by climate and human activity. The forests, which naturally regrow on land previously deforested for agriculture and now abandoned, are developing at different speeds.