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Environment - 19.10.2021
Curbing spread of waterborne diseases through new water monitoring method
An innovative way of identifying contaminated drinking water could reduce the spread of deadly diarrhoeal diseases by enabling communities to take action more quickly to limit exposure, a new study co-led by UCL academics has found. The paper, published in Water Research , shows how a technique exploiting the fluorescent properties of microbiological materials in water can instantly detect faecal contamination and is a more reliable indicator of the risk of impurities than previous testing methods.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.10.2021
Tree-dwelling mammals survived after asteroid strike destroyed forests | University of Cambridge
Tree-dwelling mammals survived after asteroid strike destroyed forests | University of Cambridge
An asteroid strike 66 million years ago wiped out the non-avian dinosaurs and devastated the Earth's forests, but tree-dwelling ancestors of primates may have survived it, according to a new study published in the journal Ecology and Evolution . The recovery of terrestrial vertebrate life following the end-Cretaceous asteroid impact was one of the most important events in the history of life on Earth Daniel Field Overall, the study supports the h

Transport - Environment - 11.10.2021
Cut European short-haul flights to dramatically reduce emissions according to new research
New data curated by scientists at The University of Manchester has found that the main culprit for aviation emissions across the connected continent of Europe is countless short journey flights. The research, recently published in journal Transportation Research , identified that a large number of flights over distances of less than 300 miles between city pairs with existing public transport connections are a key contributor of harmful emissions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.10.2021
Crayfish and carp among invasive species pushing lakes towards ecosystem collapse | University of Cambridge
Crayfish and carp among invasive species pushing lakes towards ecosystem collapse | University of Cambridge
Certain invasive, non-native species can disrupt lakes to the point of rapid ecosystem collapse, contaminating water for drinking, aquaculture and recreation, a new study has found. Simply undoing the circumstances that triggered a tipping point will not restore the ecosystem - the road to recovery is slow and steep.

Environment - Research Management - 04.10.2021
Increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere teaches old oaks new tricks
Increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere teaches old oaks new tricks
Mature oak trees will increase their rate of photosynthesis by up to a third in response to the raised CO2 levels expected to be the world average by about 2050, new research shows. The results, published in Tree Physiology , are the first to emerge from a giant outdoor experiment, led by the University of Birmingham in which an old oak forest is bathed in elevated levels of CO2.

Environment - Health - 04.10.2021
One-third of people globally will still rely on polluting cooking fuels in 2030
Almost one-in-three people around the world will still be mainly using polluting cooking fuels and technologies- a major source of disease and environmental destruction and devastation - in 2030, new research warned. This rises to more than four-in-five in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the number of people mainly using polluting fuels is growing at an alarming rate.

Chemistry - Environment - 29.09.2021
Researchers identify and clear efficiency hurdle for organic solar cells | University of Cambridge
Researchers identify and clear efficiency hurdle for organic solar cells | University of Cambridge
Researchers have identified a key mechanism responsible for the lower efficiencies of organic solar cells and shown a way that this hurdle might be overcome. Organic solar cells can do lots of things that inorganic solar cells can't, but their commercial development has plateaued in recent years, in part due to their inferior efficiency Alexander Gillett The researchers, led by the , identified a loss pathway in organic solar cells which makes them less efficient than silicon-based cells at converting sunlight into electricity.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 27.09.2021
Dinosaurs' ascent driven by volcanoes powering climate change
Dinosaurs’ ascent driven by volcanoes powering climate change
The rise of dinosaurs coincided with environmental changes driven by major volcanic eruptions over 230 million years ago, a new study reveals. The Late Triassic Carnian Pluvial Episode (CPE) saw an increase in global temperature and humidity - creating a major impact on the development of animal and plant life, coinciding with the establishment of modern conifers.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.09.2021
Changing diets to tackle climate change ’unattainable’ for minority groups
Making food more affordable for ethnic minority groups is crucial to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from our diets, scientists have suggested. According to a new study of food habits in the US, a healthy diet with lower environmental impacts is achievable for a large portion of the population. But it is unaffordable for up to 38% of Black and Hispanic individuals in the lowest income and education groups, twice the percentage of white individuals in the same group.

Paleontology - Environment - 14.09.2021
Modern snakes evolved from a few survivors of dino-killing asteroid
Modern snakes evolved from a few survivors of dino-killing asteroid
Research from the Milner Centre for Evolution suggests modern snakes evolved from a handful of ancestors that survived the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs. Last updated on Tuesday 14 September 2021 A new study suggests that all living snakes evolved from a handful of species that survived the giant asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs and most other living things at the end of the Cretaceous.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.09.2021
Ancient sea ice core sheds light on modern climate change
Ancient sea ice core sheds light on modern climate change
A 170 m record of marine sediment cores extracted from Adélie Land in Antarctica by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Programme is yielding new insights into the complicated relationship between sea ice and climate change. In a new study published , researchers at the University of Birmingham, have collaborated in an international project to identify how fluctuations in sea ice levels have interconnected with both algae blooms and weather events linked to El Nino over the past 12,000 years.

Environment - 08.09.2021
Limiting fossil fuel extraction to meet 1.5°C
Nearly 60% of both oil and fossil methane gas and almost 90% of coal must remain in the ground by 2050 in order to keep global warming below 1.5°C, finds a study by UCL researchers. Global oil and gas production must decline by 3% annually until 2050 in order to reach this target. Many fossil fuel extraction projects, both planned and operational, are not conducive to meeting internationally agreed target limits on global warming, as set out by the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 07.09.2021
Urgent need for new approach to combat global grassland degradation
Global grasslands are a source of biodiversity and provide a host of benefits to humans, including food production, water supply, and carbon storage. But their future looks bleak without action to halt their degradation and promote their restoration, according to the authors of a new paper published in the journal Nature Reviews Earth & Environment .

Life Sciences - Environment - 06.09.2021
Newly developed evolved enzymes produce renewable isobutene
New research published today details a breakthrough in the creation of evolved enzymes to support a renewable process to make one of the key building blocks of the chemical industry used in everything from beauty products to fuel. The newly published findings are the result of collaborative work between Global Bioenergies and the team of Dr. David Leys at The University of Manchester, and have been published today .

Environment - 06.09.2021
Hidden air pollutants on the rise in cities in India and the UK - study
Hidden air pollutants on the rise in cities in India and the UK - study
Levels of air pollutants in cities in India are on the rise, according to scientists using observations from instruments on satellites that scan the global skies every day. Researchers used a long record of data gathered by space-based instruments to estimate trends in a range of air pollutants for 2005 to 2018, timed to coincide with well-established air quality policies in the UK and rapid development in India.

Environment - Economics / Business - 06.09.2021
Economic cost of climate change could be six times higher than previously thought
Economic models of climate change may have substantially underestimated the costs of continued warming, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. Published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters , the international team of scientists found that the economic damage could be six times higher by the end of this century than previously estimated.

Environment - 02.09.2021
Going up: birds and mammals evolve faster if their home is rising
Going up: birds and mammals evolve faster if their home is rising
The rise and fall of Earth's land surface over the last three million years shaped the evolution of birds and mammals, a new study has found, with new species evolving at higher rates where the land has risen most.

Environment - 27.08.2021
Finding plastic-free alternatives to protect young trees
Saplings should be planted without protective plastic guards, according to an environmental impact study led by UCL researchers. Young trees are usually planted in plastic tubes to protect them from being eaten by animals, but these plastic guards often break down into harmful microplastics.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.08.2021
Plants evolved ability to actively control water-loss earlier than previously thought
New research has shed light on when plants first evolved the ability to respond to changing humidity in the air around them, and was probably a feature of a common ancestor of both flowering plants and ferns. Key to the regulation mechanism are tiny holes, or pores, on the surface of leaves, called stomata.

Environment - 23.08.2021
Integrated conservation strategies could simultaneously meet biodiversity, climate, and water objectives
Integrated conservation strategies could simultaneously meet biodiversity, climate, and water objectives
Managing a strategically chosen 30% of land for conservation could safeguard 70% of all terrestrial plant and vertebrate animal species, while simultaneously conserving around two-thirds of the world's vulnerable carbon and clean water, according to a new study carried out by the Nature Map Consortium, involving the University of Cambridge.
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