news 2021

« BACK

Social Sciences



Results 1 - 16 of 16.


Social Sciences - Psychology - 19.02.2021
Boys who play video games have lower depression risk
Boys who play video games have lower depression risk
Boys who regularly play video games at age 11 are less likely to develop depressive symptoms three years later, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher. The study, published in Psychological Medicine , also found that girls who spend more time on social media appear to develop more depressive symptoms.

Health - Social Sciences - 18.02.2021
Researchers to collaborate on national study to understand long COVID
What is long COVID and how can diagnosis be improved? Using data from electronic health records at a national scale alongside information from thousands of participants in the UK-s population-based cohort studies, these and other questions will be tackled following today's [18 February] announcement of a nationwide long COVID study led by University College London (UCL).

Health - Social Sciences - 17.02.2021
Robotic dogs and laughter therapy: 10 ways to combat loneliness and isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs and laughter therapy: 10 ways to combat loneliness and isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs, laughter therapy and mindfulness are some of the ways that might help people - particularly the elderly - cope with loneliness and social isolation while social distancing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. Lockdown and social distancing measures have meant that many people have little or no contact with others, which can lead to loneliness and isolation Christopher Williams A team at Cambridge's School of Medicine carried out a systematic review looking at the existing evidence on different approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 12.02.2021
Women better at reading minds than men - new study
Bath psychologists have developed the first ever 'mind-reading questionnaire' to assess how well people understand what others are really thinking. Last updated on Friday 12 February 2021 A new approach to 'mind-reading' has been developed by researchers at the University of Bath, Cardiff, and London to improve how well we understand what others are thinking.

Health - Social Sciences - 10.02.2021
’Sleep hygiene’ should be integrated into epilepsy diagnosis and management - study
Children with epilepsy sleep poorly compared to healthy children, and are more likely to experience disruptions such as night terrors, sleep walking or sleep disordered breathing, according to a new study. A team at the University of Birmingham's Centre for Human Brain Health analysed 19 published studies on sleep and epilepsy in children and adolescents to try to better understand and articulate the links between them.

Social Sciences - 10.02.2021
10% of teenagers have tried hard drugs by age 17
Almost a third of 17-year-olds have tried cannabis and one in 10 have tried harder drugs, such as cocaine, ecstasy and ketamine, with similar rates of experimentation regardless of parents' education level, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The research, published today in a briefing paper by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies at the UCL Social Research Institute, examines engagement in substance use and antisocial behaviours among Generation Z as they reached late adolescence.

Health - Social Sciences - 09.02.2021
Contact patterns changed in response to national COVID-19 guidance
The number of daily contacts changed over the course of 2020, following the first lockdown, corresponding to alterations in the COVID-19 guidance, suggests a study among staff and students at the University of Bristol. The research led by scientists at the University of Bristol is published on the pre-print server medRxiv.org.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 09.02.2021
14 could be peak age for believing in conspiracy theories
Belief in conspiracy theories is heightened as adolescents reach 14 years of age, reveals new research involving the University of Glasgow A study conducted by a team of psychologists from across the UK, including UofG's Dr Yvonne Skipper, has uncovered that belief in conspiracy theories flourishes in teenage years.

Social Sciences - Health - 08.02.2021
Study identifies ’post-traumatic growth’ emerging from COVID-19 lockdowns
A new study suggests that despite considerable adversity, many people have also experienced positive effects in lockdown as a result of a less frenetic life. Last updated on Monday 8 February 2021 Results from a new study which draws on survey data collected during the peak of the first wave of the pandemic suggests that being forced to slow down life, as a consequence of lockdown, has had significant, positive impacts for many people and their families.

Health - Social Sciences - 03.02.2021
Report highlights devastating impacts of COVID-19 in the Gaza Strip
New research into the acute impacts of COVID in Gaza argues that the international community must respond urgently to the unfolding crisis. Last updated on Thursday 4 February 2021 Insufficient attention is being paid to the unfolding COVID-19 crisis playing out in the Gaza Strip, according to a team of international experts.

Social Sciences - 01.02.2021
Stop scrolling! Volunteers wanted for week-long social media detox study
Researchers want adults to come forward for a new study to determine how taking a short break from social media might impact our mental and physical health. Last updated on Tuesday 2 February 2021 Student researchers at the University of Bath are running a new study into how a social detox for a week could impact our physical and mental health and want volunteers to take part.

Social Sciences - 28.01.2021
Hundreds of fake Twitter accounts linked to China sowed disinformation prior to the US election - report
Hundreds of fake Twitter accounts linked to China sowed disinformation prior to the US election - report
A sophisticated China-linked social media operation played a key role in spreading disinformation during and after the US election, a report from Cardiff University concludes. The study, from the Crime and Security Research Institute, shows evidence of the network's activities reaching a wide audience, most successfully through a now debunked viral video that was later shared by Eric Trump, son of former US President Donald Trump, falsely showing ballots being burned on election day.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 21.01.2021
Teenagers catch moods and negative moods are more contagious
Mental health and emotional wellbeing among young people could be better understood by findings in a recently published pape r from the Universities of Birmingham and Oxford, which reveal that teenagers catch moods from friends and bad moods are more contagious than good ones. The authors, Dr Stephanie Burnett Heyes , of the University of Birmingham's School of Psychology and Dr Per Block , of Oxford's Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science , hope the ground-breaking study could lead to improved understanding of emotional wellbeing.

Social Sciences - Health - 17.01.2021
National data may be underestimating illicit drug use in young people
A study published today [18 January] in the publication Addiction suggests that the UK government's current national population-based data may be understating illicit drug usage among young people by as much as 20 per cent. Researchers from the University of Bristol compared data from the Crime Survey England and Wales (CSEW) with that of the Bristol-based longitudinal health study Children of the 90s.

Health - Social Sciences - 14.01.2021
No limit to the benefits of exercise in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease
A new study led by the University of Oxford on over 90,000 participants shows that there is no upper threshold to the benefits of exercise in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease - 'every move counts towards better cardiovascular health.' Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death globally, claiming around 17.9 million lives each year.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 13.01.2021
Smacking young children has long-lasting effects
Children who have adverse experiences such as being smacked at the age of three are more likely to suffer from poor mental health and have behavioural problems through to age 14, according to a study led by UCL researchers. Children who have adverse experiences such as being smacked at the age of three are more likely to suffer from poor mental health and have behavioural problems through to age 14, according to a study led by UCL researchers.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |