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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.04.2021
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham's astronomers are playing a key role in the biggest scientific programme to be carried out on the new successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Our scientists will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to hunt for dark matter and investigate early galaxy formation. The JWST is the largest, most powerful space telescope ever built and is scheduled for launch in October 2021 before beginning operations in 2022.

Health - Physics - 15.04.2021
Understanding the growth of disease-causing protein fibres
Researchers have developed a method to directly measure the growth rate of 'amyloid' fibrils linked to Parkinson's and other diseases. Last updated on Monday 19 April 2021 Amyloid fibrils are deposits of proteins in the body that join together to form microscopic fibres. Their formation has been linked to many serious human diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Type 2 diabetes.

Physics - 12.04.2021
Following atoms in real time could lead to better materials design
Following atoms in real time could lead to better materials design
Researchers have used a technique similar to MRI to follow the movement of individual atoms in real time as they cluster together to form two-dimensional materials, which are a single atomic layer thick. This technique isn't a new one, but it's never been used in this way, to measure the growth of a two-dimensional material Nadav Avidor The results , reported in the journal Physical Review Letters , could be used to design new types of materials and quantum technology devices.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 08.04.2021
Particle’s ’wobble’ hints at new physics
The "wobble", or rate of precession, of the muon particle in a magnetic field is different from what our best theoretical model of the subatomic world would predict, according to an experiment involving UCL researchers that strengthens evidence for new, unknown physics. The Muon g-2 experiment, carried out at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, measured with unprecedented precision the rate at which the muon "wobbled" (precessed) as it circulated a 15-metre magnetic ring at nearly the speed of light.

Physics - 01.04.2021
Promise of quantum computing using factory-made silicon chips
Promise of quantum computing using factory-made silicon chips
A single qubit on a standard silicon transistor chip has been successfully demonstrated as "quantum capable" in a new study by the UCL spinout Quantum Motion, led by researchers at UCL and Oxford University. The qubit is the building block of quantum computing, analogous to the bit in classical computers.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 01.04.2021
Distant stars spiralling towards a collision give clues to the forces that bind sub-atomic particles
Bath space scientists have found a new way to probe the internal structure of neutron stars, giving clues about the makeup of matter at an atomic level. Last updated on Friday 16 April 2021 Space scientists at the University of Bath have found a new way to probe the internal structure of neutron stars, giving nuclear physicists a novel tool for studying the structures that make up matter at an atomic level.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.03.2021
New image of magnetic fields at black hole's edge
New image of magnetic fields at black hole’s edge
A new image of the supermassive M87 black hole has been unveiled by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration involving UCL researchers, giving a closer look at how the black hole interacts with the matter surrounding it. The EHT team released the first image of a black hole in 2019, revealing a bright ring-like structure with a dark central region described as the black hole's shadow.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.03.2021
New image reveals magnetic fields at black hole’s edge
A new image of the supermassive M87 black hole has been unveiled by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration involving UCL researchers, giving a closer look at how the black hole interacts with the matter surrounding it. The EHT team released the first image of a black hole in 2019, revealing a bright ring-like structure with a dark central region described as the black hole's shadow.

Physics - 23.03.2021
New result from the LHCb experiment challenges leading theory in physics
New result from the LHCb experiment challenges leading theory in physics
Bristol physicists are part of a team that has announced 'tantalising' results that potentially cannot be explained by our current laws of nature. The LHCb Collaboration at CERN has found particles not behaving the way they should according to the guiding theory of particle physics - the Standard Model.

Physics - 23.03.2021
New result from LHCb experiment challenges leading theory in physics
New result from LHCb experiment challenges leading theory in physics
UK particle physicists have today announced 'intriguing' results that potentially cannot be explained by the current laws of nature. This new result offers tantalising hints of the presence of a new fundamental particle or force that interacts differently with these different types of particles. Paula Alvarez Cartelle Results from the LHCb Collaboration at CERN suggests particles are not behaving the way they should according to the guiding theory of particle physics - suggesting gaps in our understanding of the Universe.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.03.2021
Start small to answer big questions about photosynthesis
Start small to answer big questions about photosynthesis
New scientific techniques are revealing the intricate role that proteins play in photosynthesis. Despite being discovered almost 300 years ago, photosynthesis still holds many unanswered questions for science, particularly the way proteins organise themselves to convert sunlight into chemical energy and, at the same time, protect plants from too much sunlight.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 05.03.2021
Giant ’quantum twisters’ may form in liquid light
New mechanism found for generating giant vortices in quantum fluids of light. Anyone who has drained a bathtub or stirred cream into coffee has seen a vortex, a ubiquitous formation that appears when fluid circulates. But unlike water, fluids governed by the strange rules of quantum mechanics have a special restriction: as was first predicted in 1945 by future Nobel winner Lars Onsager, a vortex in a quantum fluid can only twist by whole-number units.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.03.2021
Source of hazardous high-energy particles located in the Sun
The source of potentially hazardous solar particles, released from the Sun at high speed during storms in its outer atmosphere, has been located for the first time by researchers at UCL and George Mason University, Virginia, USA. These particles are highly charged and, if they reach Earth's atmosphere, can potentially disrupt satellites and electronic infrastructure, as well as pose a radiation risk to astronauts and people in airplanes.

Physics - Chemistry - 02.03.2021
Through the looking glass: artificial ’molecules’ open door to ultrafast devices
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Skoltech in Russia have shown that polaritons, the quirky particles that may end up running the quantum supercomputers of the future, can form structures that behave like molecules - and these 'artificial molecules' can potentially be engineered on demand.

Physics - 01.03.2021
Photon-photon polaritons: the intriguing particles that emerge when two photons couple
Researchers exploring the interactions between light particles, photons and matter find that optical microresonators host quasiparticles made by two photons. Last updated on Tuesday 2 March 2021 Scientists at the University of Bath have found a way to bind together two photons of different colours, paving the way for important advancements in quantum-electrodynamics - the field of science that describes how light and matter interact.

Health - Physics - 24.02.2021
Identification of 'violent' processes that cause wheezing could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for lung disease
Identification of ’violent’ processes that cause wheezing could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for lung disease
A team of engineers has identified the 'violent' physical processes at work inside the lungs which cause wheezing, a condition that affects up to a quarter of the world's population. Since wheezing is associated with so many conditions, it is difficult to be sure of what is wrong with a patient just based on the wheeze Anurag Agarwal The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used modelling and high-speed video techniques to show what causes wheezing and how to predict it.

Physics - Life Sciences - 24.02.2021
Video of ’dancing DNA’ developed by researchers
Videos showing for the first time how small circles of DNA adopt dance-like movements have been developed by a team led by researchers at UCL and the Universities of Leeds, York and Sheffield. The footage is based on some of the highest resolution images of a single molecule of DNA ever captured, with DNA seen to "dance" in microscopy data recorded at the London Centre for Nanotechnology at UCL.  The images show in unprecedented detail how the stresses and strains that are placed on DNA when it is crammed inside cells can change its shape.

Life Sciences - Physics - 16.02.2021
Visualisation of 'dancing DNA'
Visualisation of ’dancing DNA’
Videos showing for the first time how small circles of DNA adopt dance-like movements inside a cell have been developed by researchers in Yorkshire. The footage, created by a team of scientists from the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York, and recorded at UCL, is based on the highest resolution images of a single molecule of DNA ever captured.

Physics - Computer Science - 15.02.2021
Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Researchers have found a way to use light and a single electron to communicate with a cloud of quantum bits and sense their behaviour, making it possible to detect a single quantum bit in a dense cloud. We don't have a way of 'talking' to the cloud and the cloud doesn't have a way of talking to us. But what we can talk to is an electron: we can communicate with it sort of like a dog that herds sheep Mete Atatüre The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, were able to inject a 'needle' of highly fragile quantum information in a 'haystack' of 100,000 nuclei.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.02.2021
Astronomers identify new method of planet formation
Astronomers identify new method of planet formation
Scientists have suggested a new explanation for the abundance in intermediate-mass exoplanets - a long-standing puzzle in astronomy. In the last 25 years, scientists have discovered over 4000 planets outside our solar system. From relatively small rock and water worlds to blisteringly hot gas giants, these planets display a remarkable variety.

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