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Pedagogy - Psychology - 31.03.2021
More support needed for two children in every class with hidden language disorder
Research from Bath psychologists suggests schools could introduce quieter alternatives to playtime to help children with Developmental Language Disorder. Last updated on Wednesday 31 March 2021 Children with a common but regularly undiagnosed disorder affecting their language and communication are likely to be finding the transition back to school post-lockdown harder than most, according to a team of psychologists.

Pedagogy - Health - 26.03.2021
Bristol primary school pupils become scientists for a day
Bristol primary school pupils become scientists for a day
Pupils at a Bristol school became scientists for a day to understand more about how PCR testing works to diagnose for COVID-19. Four Acres Academy is one of many local schools that are taking part in a ground-breaking University of Bristol research project to increase researchers understanding of infection patterns of COVID-19 in children.

Pedagogy - 26.03.2021
Global evidence for how EdTech can support pupils with disabilities is ’thinly spread’, report finds
An "astonishing"ádeficit of data about how the global boom in educational technology could help pupils with disabilities in low and middle-income countries has been highlighted in a new report.

Pedagogy - 26.03.2021
Global evidence for how EdTech can support pupils with disabilities is ’thinly spread’
An 'astonishing' deficit of data about how the global boom in educational technology could help pupils with disabilities in low and middle-income countries has been highlighted in a. Despite widespread optimism that educational technology, or 'EdTech', can help to level the playing field for young people with disabilities, the study found a significant shortage of evidence about which innovations are best-positioned to help which children, and why; specifically in low-income contexts.

Pedagogy - 10.03.2021
Being born small doesn’t tend to disadvantage IVF babies’ cognitive development
Children conceived through medically assisted reproduction who are born small do just as well in cognitive tests during childhood and adolescence as naturally conceived children who are born a normal weight, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Health - Pedagogy - 10.02.2021
Wider lockdown key to preventing Covid-19 surge if schools reopen
Wider restrictions must remain in place if schools reopen in March in order to keep the epidemic's R number below 1 in the UK, a new UCL-led modelling study suggests. The pre-print study, published on the site medRxiv, suggested that reopening schools to all pupils in some form on March 8 may lead to an increase in cases but that, if a broader lockdown remained, it was unlikely to cause the R rate to go above 1 and lead to the epidemic growing again.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 03.02.2021
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching children in a way that encourages them to empathise with others measurably improves their creativity, and could potentially lead to several other beneficial learning outcomes, new research suggests. We clearly awakened something in these pupils by encouraging them to think about the thoughts and feelings of others Helen Demetriou The findings are from a year-long University of Cambridge study with Design and Technology (D&T) year 9 pupils (ages 13 to 14) at two inner London schools.

Pedagogy - 02.02.2021
Why learning, not rewards, may be the key to happiness
Dr Bastien Blain (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) co-authors an article on his new research, which finds how we learn about our world may be more important for how we feel than the rewards we actually receive. Our obsession with happiness isn't as modern as it may seem. Philosophers from Aristotle to Jeremy Bentham have all argued that subjective wellbeing is crucial.

Pedagogy - 12.01.2021
Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. The decisions reached by family courts can have a major impact on a child's life, but as we've seen, these decisions may be based on incorrect understanding and assumptions Robbie Duschinsky Seventy experts from across the globe argue that widespread misunderstandings around attachment research have hampered its accurate implementation, with potentially negative consequences for decisions in family courts.

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