news 2021


Category

Years
2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009



Results 81 - 100 of 582.


Life Sciences - Health - 19.05.2021
New insight into protein production in brain could help tackle dementia
New insight into protein production in brain could help tackle dementia
A pioneering new study led by UCL scientists has revealed, for the first time, a layer of genetic material involved in controlling the production of tau; a protein which plays a critical role in serious degenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. The international research, conducted in mice and cells, also revealed this material is part of a larger family of non-coding genes* which control and regulate other similar brain proteins, such as beta amyloid associated with Alzheimer's and alpha-synuclein implicated in Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia.

Life Sciences - 18.05.2021
To alter colour and ripening rates of tomatoes
To alter colour and ripening rates of tomatoes
Scientists at the University of Oxford's Department of Plant Sciences have discovered how the overall process of fruit ripening in tomato (including colour changes and softening) can be changed -speeded up or slowed down - by modifying the expression of a single protein located in subcellular organelles called the plastids.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.05.2021
Intensive agriculture could drive loss of bees and other tropical pollinators
Pollinators in the tropics are less likely to thrive in intensive croplands, finds a new study led by UCL researchers suggesting bees and butterflies are at risk of major losses. Across the globe, lower levels of land use intensity are good for pollinators, finds the new Nature Communications paper which shows the importance of sustainable land management in cities and agricultural regions.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.05.2021
Finding quasars: rare extragalactic objects are now easier to spot
Finding quasars: rare extragalactic objects are now easier to spot
Astrophysicists have developed a new method for finding changing-looking quasars - important but extremely rare objects in deep space. Last updated on Tuesday 18 May 2021 Astrophysicists from the University of Bath have developed a new method for pinpointing the whereabouts of extremely rare extragalactic objects.

Astronomy / Space Science - 17.05.2021
Dating the stars - scientist provide most accurate picture yet
Dating the stars - scientist provide most accurate picture yet
Scientists have succeeded in dating some of the oldest stars in our galaxy with unprecedented precision by combining data from the stars' oscillations with information about their chemical composition. The team led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, surveyed around a hundred red giant stars, and were able to determine that some of these were originally part of a satellite galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus, which collided with the Milky Way early in its history.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2021
Mothers can influence offspring's height, lifespan and disease risk in unexpected ways - through their mitochondria
Mothers can influence offspring’s height, lifespan and disease risk in unexpected ways - through their mitochondria
Mitochondria -  the 'batteries' that power our cells - play an unexpected role in common diseases such as type 2 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, concludes a study of over 350,000 people conducted by the University of Cambridge. If you want a complete picture of common diseases, then clearly you're going to need to factor in the influence of mitochondrial DNA Patrick Chinnery The study, published today , found that genetic variants in the DNA of mitochondria could increase the risk of developing these conditions, as well influencing characteristics such as height and lifespan.

Environment - 17.05.2021
African rainforests can resist severe heat and drought
African rainforests can resist severe heat and drought
Scientists studying the impact of record heat and drought on intact African tropical rainforests were surprised by how resilient they were to extreme conditions during the last major El Niño event. The Leeds-led international study, reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today, found that intact rainforests across tropical Africa continued to remove carbon from the atmosphere before and during the 2015-2016 El Niño, despite the extreme heat and drought.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 17.05.2021
Warnings on the dangers of screen time are ill founded - new study
Warnings on the dangers of screen time are ill founded - new study
Research that requires participants to estimate their own digital screen time cannot provide reliable information on mental health impact. Last updated on Thursday 20 May 2021 Research that requires participants to estimate their own digital screen time cannot provide reliable information on mental health impact, concludes a major international review.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 16.05.2021
Increased emotional difficulties in children during the pandemic
Whilst the rise in emotional problems in teenagers and young adults since the pandemic has become clearer, little is known about the emotional response of pre-school and primary school aged children. Using data tracking children's emotional development at multiple ages before and during the pandemic, the research team were able to explore differences in trajectories of emotional difficulties in children before and during the pandemic.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.05.2021
Scientists hunt for evidence of 'lensed' gravitational waves
Scientists hunt for evidence of ’lensed’ gravitational waves
Scientists searching for evidence of lensed gravitational waves have published new research outlining the most recent findings on their quest for the first detection of these elusive signals. Gravitational lensing has been predicted by Einstein himself, and observed by scientists for decades: light emitted by distant objects in the Universe is bent by the gravitational pull of very massive galaxies, as they cross the line-of-sight of the light source.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 14.05.2021
Fibre-optics help create most detailed picture of Greenland Ice Sheet
Fibre-optics help create most detailed picture of Greenland Ice Sheet
Scientists have used a fibre-optic sensor passed deep into a borehole to obtain the most detailed measurements of ice properties ever taken on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Their findings will be used to make more accurate models of the future movement of the world’s second-largest ice sheet, as the effects of climate change continue to accelerate.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.05.2021
New immunotherapy 'highly effective' against hepatitis B virus
New immunotherapy ’highly effective’ against hepatitis B virus
Scientists at UCL have identified a new immunotherapy to combat the hepatitis B virus (HBV), the most common cause of liver cancer in the world. Each year, globally, chronic HBV causes an estimated 880,000 deaths from liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma/liver cancer (HCC). The pioneering study used immune cells isolated directly from patient liver and tumour tissue ,  to show that targeting acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), an enzyme that helps to manage cholesterol levels in cells*, was highly effective at boosting immune responses.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.05.2021
New report highlights satellite observation as vital to tackling climate change
Professor Marian Scott of the School of Mathematics and Statistics is one of the co-authors of a new briefing paper from the COP26 Universities Network. Although the UK is at the forefront of developing and harnessing technology to turn Earth Observation (EO) data into actionable information, more education and training is needed to maximise its potential and help the world to meet challenging climate targets.

Paleontology - Environment - 14.05.2021
Herbivores developed powerful jaws to digest tougher plants following the Mass Extinctions
Herbivores developed powerful jaws to digest tougher plants following the Mass Extinctions
The evolution of herbivores is linked to the plants that survived and adapted after the 'great dying', when over 90% of the world's species were wiped out 252 million years ago. Researchers at the University of Bristol found that plant eaters diversified quickly after mass extinctions to eat different kinds of plants, and the ones that were able to chew harsher materials, which reflected the drying conditions of the late Triassic, became the most successful.

Environment - 14.05.2021
Trace gases from ocean are source of particles accelerating Antarctic climate change
Trace gases from ocean are source of particles accelerating Antarctic climate change
Scientists exploring the drivers of Antarctic climate change have discovered a new and more efficient pathway for the creation of natural aerosols and clouds which contribute significantly to temperature increases. The Antarctic Peninsula has shown some of the largest global increases in near-surface air temperature over the last 50 years, but experts have struggled to predict temperatures because little was known about how natural aerosols and clouds affect the amount of sunlight absorbed by the Earth and energy radiated back into space.

Health - 14.05.2021
New study into paediatric intensive care paves the way for improving care for critically ill children
A new study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham has identified factors that increase the likelihood of critically ill children needing life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Using anonymised hospital records in the first multi-centre study of its kind in England, the team found that one of these factors related to race, with children from Black and Asian ethnic backgrounds more likely to require CPR.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.05.2021
New imaging technique could lead to better bio-implants for patients
University of Birmingham scientists have developed a new microscopic imaging approach to take a closer look at 3D-printing for developing future patient implants, as well as improved disease modelling and drug screening. Additive manufacturing (3D printing) platforms create bioprinted structures by moving a special bioink, containing cells, biomolecules and materials, through a narrow tube, but the process can result in cells becoming damaged as they pass through the tiny tube.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.05.2021
Five-year quest to create 3D map of the universe
A five-year mission to create an unprecedented 3D map of the universe using the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), designed and built in part by UCL physicists, formally starts today.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 14.05.2021
Supercomputer simulations unlock space weather puzzle
Scientists have long questioned why the bursts of hot gas from the Sun do not cool down as fast as expected, and now a UCL-led team of researchers have used a supercomputer to find out why. The team will now compare their simulations with 'real' data from the European Space Agency's flagship Solar Orbiter mission, with the hope that it will confirm their predictions and provide a conclusive answer.

Environment - 14.05.2021
Antarctic ice sheet retreat could trigger chain reaction
Antarctic ice sheet retreat could trigger chain reaction
New study suggests increasing rainfall could reduce the ability of the climate system to maintain a large Antarctic ice sheet. The Antarctic ice sheet was even more unstable in the past than previously thought, and at times possibly came close to collapse, new research from Cardiff University suggests.