news 2021


Category


Years
2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009


Results 61 - 80 of 187.


Health - Pharmacology - 09.02.2021
Common asthma treatment reduces need for hospitalisation in COVID-19 patients, study suggests | University of Oxford
Early treatment with a medication commonly used to treat asthma appears to significantly reduce the need for urgent care and hospitalisation in people with COVID-19, researchers at the have found. The STOIC study found that inhaled budesonide given to patients with COVID-19 within seven days of the onset of symptoms also reduced recovery time.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.02.2021
All in the head? Brains adapt to support new species
All in the head? Brains adapt to support new species
Scientists studying forest dwelling butterflies in Central and South America have discovered that changes in the way animals perceive and process information from their environment can support the emergence of new species. The study led by the University of Bristol, and published today [9 February] in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), has implications for how new species might evolve and the underappreciated role of changes in the brain.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.02.2021
COVID R&D response shows what’s possible for future healthcare and environmental innovation
New analysis of the R&D response to COVID argues that future innovation could be dramatically scaled up to tackle other major diseases or even climate change. Last updated on Tuesday 9 February 2021 Policymakers need to rethink their approach to tackling long-standing healthcare and environmental challenges and can learn lessons from the success of research and development in responding to COVID-19, say the authors of a new study.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 08.02.2021
New method developed for 'up-sizing' mini organs used in medical research
New method developed for ’up-sizing’ mini organs used in medical research
A team of engineers and scientists has developed a method of 'multiplying' organoids: miniature collections of cells which mimic the behaviour of various organs and are promising tools for the study of human biology and disease. We need to find the right conditions to help the cells in mini-organs self-organise Yan Yan Shery Huang The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used their method to culture and grow a 'mini-airway', the first time that a tube-shaped organoid has been developed without the need for any external support.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.02.2021
Respiratory support used for COVID-19 patients produce less aerosol emission than breathing, speaking or coughing
Respiratory support used to treat patients with severe COVID-19 are associated with less aerosol emission than breathing, speaking or coughing new research suggests. The study led by researchers from the University of Bristol and North Bristol NHS Trust (NBT) is published on the pre-print server medRxiv.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.02.2021
'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism
’Magnetic graphene’ forms a new kind of magnetism
Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material. The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, were able to control the conductivity and magnetism of iron thiophosphate (FePS 3 ), a two-dimensional material which undergoes a transition from an insulator to a metal when compressed.

Health - 08.02.2021
Online search activity can help predict peaks in COVID-19 cases
Online search data can help inform the public health response to COVID-19, according to a report from UCL, allowing experts to predict a peak in cases on average 17 days in advance. Analysing internet search activity is an established method of tracking and understanding infectious diseases, and is currently used to monitor seasonal flu.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.02.2021
Genes for face shape identified
Genes that determine the shape of a person's facial profile have been discovered by a UCL-led research team. The researchers identified 32 gene regions that influenced facial features such as nose, lip, jaw, and brow shape, nine of which were entirely new discoveries while the others validated genes with prior limited evidence.

Materials Science - Physics - 08.02.2021
Newly-developed material could lead to lighter, safer car designs
A new form of 3D-printed material made by combining commonly-used plastics with carbon nanotubes is tougher and lighter than similar forms of aluminium, scientists say. The material could lead to the development of safer, lighter and more durable structures for use in the aerospace, automotive, renewables and marine industries.

Mathematics - Physics - 08.02.2021
'Multiplying' light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers
’Multiplying’ light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers
New type of optical computing could solve highly complex problems that are out of reach for even the most powerful supercomputers. An important class of challenging computational problems, with applications in graph theory, neural networks, artificial intelligence and error-correcting codes can be solved by multiplying light signals, according to researchers from the University of Cambridge and Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Russia.

Psychology - Health - 08.02.2021
Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses
A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. Patients with depression or psychosis rarely experience symptoms of purely one or the other illness. Historically, this has meant that mental health clinicians give a diagnosis of a ‘primary' illness, but with secondary symptoms.

Social Sciences - Health - 08.02.2021
Study identifies ’post-traumatic growth’ emerging from COVID-19 lockdowns
A new study suggests that despite considerable adversity, many people have also experienced positive effects in lockdown as a result of a less frenetic life. Last updated on Monday 8 February 2021 Results from a new study which draws on survey data collected during the peak of the first wave of the pandemic suggests that being forced to slow down life, as a consequence of lockdown, has had significant, positive impacts for many people and their families.

Physics - 08.02.2021
Physicists finesse the storing of light to create rainbows of colour
Physicists at the University of Bath have found a way to use resonance to harness the energy of light more effectively inside microresonators. Last updated on Monday 8 February 2021 In nature, as in everyday life, we are surrounded by resonance - the phenomenon that describes how each object has a frequency that it prefers to vibrate at.

Pharmacology - Health - 08.02.2021
Clinical trials begin to investigate treatment for diabetic eye disease
A new approach to treating one of the leading causes of blindness among patients with diabetes is being tested in clinical trials which begin this month. The trial involves 48 patient volunteers with diabetic macular oedema (DMO), a disease where blood vessels leak fluid into the retina. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetic retinopathy, affecting approximately 21 million people worldwide.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2021
Study highlights risk of new SARS-CoV-2 mutations emerging during chronic infection
Study highlights risk of new SARS-CoV-2 mutations emerging during chronic infection
SARS-CoV-2 mutations similar to those in the B1.1.7 UK variant could arise in cases of chronic infection, where treatment over an extended period can provide the virus multiple opportunities to evolve, say scientists.

Environment - Health - 05.02.2021
Climate change may have driven the emergence of SARS-CoV-2
Climate change may have driven the emergence of SARS-CoV-2
Global greenhouse gas emissions over the last century have made southern China a hotspot for bat-borne coronaviruses, by driving growth of forest habitat favoured by bats. Governments must seize the opportunity to reduce health risks from infectious diseases by taking decisive action to mitigate climate change.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.02.2021
Severely frail individuals with COVID-19 are three times more likely to die
Severely frail individuals with COVID-19 are three times more likely to die
New research led by the University of Birmingham has revealed for the first time the extent to which frailty increases the risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients. The clinical observational study , involving 5,711 patients with COVID-19 at 55 hospitals across 12 countries, found that very severely frail individuals with COVID-19 are three times more likely to die than those who were not frail, even taking into account their age.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.02.2021
Significant new SARS-CoV-2 variants may emerge during chronic infection
SARS-CoV-2 mutations similar to those in the B1.1.7 UK variant could arise in cases of chronic COVID-19 infection, where treatment over an extended period provides the virus multiple opportunities to evolve, finds research co-led by UCL. Writing in Nature , a team led comprised of researchers from UCL and Cambridge reported how they were able to observe SARS-CoV-2 mutating in the case of an immunocompromised patient treated with convalescent plasma.

Psychology - Computer Science - 05.02.2021
Tweets of fear used to spread malicious viruses online
Cybercriminals are preying on emotions of fear to spread dangerous viruses and spyware across Twitter, new research has revealed. Scientists from Cardiff University have shown, for the first time, that tweets containing malicious links are more likely to contain negative emotions, and that it is the content of the tweet that increases the likelihood of it being liked and shared, as opposed to the number of followers of the poster.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.02.2021
Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes
Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes
Oceans were once filled with the sounds of nature, but overfishing, climate change and human noise have fundamentally changed the natural underwater "soundtrack", researchers say. A global team of scientists, including six experts from three UK institutions, has documented how ocean soundscapes have changed, explored all impacts of noise on marine animals and ecosystems, and identified ways to restore a more natural soundscape.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |