news 2021


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Results 61 - 80 of 706.


Health - Pharmacology - 30.06.2021
Ethnic disparities in statin treatment may lead to more heart attacks and strokes
People of South Asian and African/ African Caribbean ethnicity who have type 2 diabetes are less likely to be prescribed statins than those of European ethnicity, potentially contributing to thousands of preventable heart attacks and strokes each year, finds a new UCL-led study. The study, published in the open access journal PLOS Medicine and funded by Diabetes UK, used a database of 12 million anonymised national health records to look at rates of statin prescribing for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who were also eligible for statins.

Health - 30.06.2021
Long COVID cases under-reported in NHS GP records
Using the full pseudonymised GP records of 57.9 million patients in England, researchers at Oxford University and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine have found that formally recorded diagnoses of Long COVID are substantially lower than previous survey estimates for the same condition.

Environment - 30.06.2021
Fairer finance could speed up net zero for Africa by a decade
Levelling up access to finance so that poorer countries can afford the funds needed to switch to renewable energy could see regions like Africa reaching net zero emissions a decade earlier, according to a study led by UCL researchers. Access to finance (credit) is vital for the green energy transition needed to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions, as laid out in the Paris Agreement.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.06.2021
Researchers to investigate new drug to stop incurable prostate cancer spread
Researchers to investigate new drug to stop incurable prostate cancer spread
A team of Cardiff researchers has won major funding of nearly half a million pounds to explore why and how prostate cancer spreads to bone. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the UK - and the second leading cause of death in men - and there is no cure when it spreads to bone. Dr Toby Phesse and Dr Helen Pearson, from the University's European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, have received £491,731 from the charity Prostate Cancer Research (PCR) to investigate how a specific cell signalling pathway is controlling the spread of prostate cancer to the bone.

Life Sciences - 30.06.2021
From meadow to plate: the cultured meat that replaces animals with grass
From meadow to plate: the cultured meat that replaces animals with grass
An affordable lab system that uses grass blades to turn cells into cultured meat has been developed at the University of Bath. Last updated on Tuesday 6 July 2021 An affordable lab system that uses grass blades to turn cells into cultured meat has been developed at the University of Bath. Researchers have successfully taken grass from the university's campus and used it to create a scaffold that animal cells can attach to and grow on.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.06.2021
The odd couple: a groundbreaking new discovery from gravitational whispers
Two gravitational wave signals from an entirely new class of cosmic collisions have been discovered by researchers working on the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. Each of the signals came from the merger of a black hole with a neutron star. The first signal was first detected on January 5 2020.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 29.06.2021
First detection of gravitational waves from black holes swallowing neutron stars
For the first time, scientists have picked up the ripples in space-time caused by the death spiral of a neutron star and a black hole. University of Glasgow researchers played a key role in the international collaboration that made the detection possible. They contributed to the design of the detectors - the most sensitive scientific instruments ever built - and the advanced data analysis needed to provide an astrophysical interpretation of the signals.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Opinion: Covid linked to loss of brain tissue, but correlation doesn’t prove causation
A study potentially linking Covid-19 to a loss of brain tissue add to concerns about the long term damage the disease can do, but more research is needed to avoid unnecessary scaremongering, says Professor Francois Balloux (UCL Genetics Institute). Early in the pandemic, it became clear that Covid-19 wasn't just a disease of the lungs.

Computer Science - Astronomy / Space Science - 29.06.2021
Artificial Intelligence pioneered at Oxford to detect floods launches into space | University of Oxford
Artificial Intelligence pioneered at Oxford to detect floods launches into space | University of Oxford
A new technology, developed by Oxford researchers, in partnership with the European Space Agency's (ESA) -lab, will pilot the detection of flood events from space. It was deployed on hardware on D'Orbit's upcoming 'Wild Ride' mission being launched by SpaceX's Falcon 9 from Cape Canaveral, 30 June, 20.00 UK time.

Social Sciences - 29.06.2021
Physically punishing children is not effective and increases behavioural problems
Physical punishment of children is not effective in improving children's behaviour and instead increases behavioural difficulties, according to a landmark review led by UCL and an international team of experts who have analysed 20 years' research on the topic. The narrative review, published today in The Lancet , looked at 69 studies worldwide that followed children over time and analysed data on physical punishment and a range of different outcomes.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Key mutations in Alpha variant enable SARS-CoV-2 to overcome evolutionary weak points
Key mutations in Alpha variant enable SARS-CoV-2 to overcome evolutionary weak points
One of the key mutations seen in the 'Alpha variant' of SARS-CoV-2 - the deletion of two amino acids, H69/V70 - enables the virus to overcome chinks in its armour as it evolves, say an international team of scientists. Understanding the significance of key mutations is important because it enables us to predict how a new variant might behave in humans when it is first identified.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 29.06.2021
Black hole and neutron star merger detected for first time
Black hole and neutron star merger detected for first time
Scientists have, for the first time, picked up the ripples in space-time caused by the collision of a neutron star and a black hole. Two instances of this violent cosmic event have been detected using the Advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors, details of which have been published today in Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Sport - 29.06.2021
Scientists mine the rich seam of body wearable motion sensors
Scientists mine the rich seam of body wearable motion sensors
A new study from the University of Bath finds that conductive seams, when strategically placed in clothing, can accurately track body motion. Last updated on Friday 2 July 2021 When positioned strategically, garment seams sewn with conductive yarn can be used to accurately track body motion, according to computer scientists at the University of Bath.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 28.06.2021
New £2.8m research project to explore mental health outcomes for young people in care
A new research project is to investigate factors linked to the mental health and wellbeing of care-experienced young people. The four-year programme is led by an interdisciplinary team from the universities of Bath and Oxford, in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff University and the University of Bristol.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.06.2021
Hotels offering rooms to homeless in pandemic reap reputational reward
Hotels offering rooms to homeless in pandemic reap reputational reward
Pandemic-hit hotels that offered their rooms to homeless people see more business benefit than choosing to support healthcare workers Last updated on Monday 28 June 2021 Hotels that opened their doors to homeless people in their community during lockdown generated greater positive word-of-mouth marketing than those that offered free accommodation to frontline healthcare workers, finds new University research.

Psychology - 25.06.2021
No increased risk of dementia in veterans
The number of Scottish veterans who develop dementia in later life is no greater than in the wider community, according to new research. The study, led by the University of Glasgow, funded by Forces in Mind Trust and published in Psychological Medicine, compared veterans with people who had never served, and found that there were no more cases of dementia than in the non-veterans.

Psychology - 25.06.2021
Mental health around pregnancy differs depending on how couples conceived
Couples who conceived through IVF and other fertility treatments have opposite mental health trajectories around the time of pregnancy to couples who conceived naturally, according to a new study by UCL and University of Padua researchers.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 24.06.2021
Nanotech and AI could hold key to unlocking global food security challenge
Nanotech and AI could hold key to unlocking global food security challenge
'Precision agriculture' where farmers respond in real time to changes in crop growth using nanotechnology and artificial intelligence (AI) could offer a practical solution to the challenges threatening global food security, a new study reveals. Climate change, increasing populations, competing demands on land for production of biofuels and declining soil quality mean it is becoming increasingly difficult to feed the world's populations.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 24.06.2021
Marmoset study identifies brain region linking actions to their outcomes
Researchers have discovered a specific brain region underlying 'goal-directed behaviour' - that is, when we consciously do something with a particular goal in mind, for example going to the shops to buy food. This is a first step towards identifying suitable molecular targets for future drug treatments, or other forms of therapy, for devastating mental health disorders such as OCD and addiction.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.06.2021
Remote home monitoring models can support COVID-19 patients and reduce demand on hospital services
Remote home monitoring models can support COVID-19 patients and reduce demand on hospital services
A study led by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) BRACE and RSET Rapid Evaluation Centres and undertaken by researchers at UCL, Nuffield Trust, RAND Europe and the University of Birmingham suggests that effective coordination between primary and secondary care to set up and deliver remote home monitoring models can help patients and reduce demand on hospital services during the period of COVID-19.