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Results 21 - 40 of 375.


Life Sciences - Health - 06.04.2021
Scientists confirm bacteria's genetic 'Swiss army knife' is key driver of antibiotic resistance
Scientists confirm bacteria’s genetic ’Swiss army knife’ is key driver of antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is a huge challenge facing society globally, posing a threat not only to human health but in areas such as food security and the economy.

Campus - Psychology - 02.04.2021
Hand signals improve video meeting success
Hand signals improve video meeting success
Using a simple set of hand signals can improve the experience of online meetings, make groups feel closer to each other and that they are learning and communicating better, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The research team trained students to use a set of signals in seminars, such as waving to take a turn to speak, and raising a hand to show empathy, and found evidence that they improved the experience of video meetings during lockdown.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2021
Cutting-edge Cryo-EM reveals key insight into vital DNA repair process
New research, using cutting-edge cryo-electron microscopy (CryoEM), has revealed key insights into a vital DNA repair process, which is implicated in resistance to cancer treatments. Led by the University of Glasgow and published in Nature Structural Biology, the research is based on data and models collected from the Scottish Centre for Macromolecular Imaging (SCMI) and was conducted with colleagues at the University of Dundee.

Life Sciences - 01.04.2021
Beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived
Beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived
Facial beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived. Instead, according to new research, it is culture and individual preferences that shape the diverse spectrum of what we think is facially attractive. A new study, led by researchers at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology and published today in Current Biology, modelled individual preferences for attractive faces in two cultures, Western European and East Asian.

Physics - 01.04.2021
Promise of quantum computing using factory-made silicon chips
Promise of quantum computing using factory-made silicon chips
A single qubit on a standard silicon transistor chip has been successfully demonstrated as "quantum capable" in a new study by the UCL spinout Quantum Motion, led by researchers at UCL and Oxford University. The qubit is the building block of quantum computing, analogous to the bit in classical computers.

Health - 01.04.2021
Nearly a third of Covid-19 hospital patients readmitted within 140 days
People discharged from hospital after Covid-19 appear to have increased risks of diseases across multiple organs and nearly a third are readmitted to hospital in the following months, according to a new study co-led by researchers at UCL. The study, published today in The BMJ , looked at nearly 50,000 people who were discharged from hospital by August last year and compared them to a control group who were matched according to personal characteristics and 10 years of medical history.

Environment - Pharmacology - 01.04.2021
Citizen scientists urged to get out into nature to support bee-spotting project this Easter
Citizen scientists are being encouraged to escape the house and help University scientists in their quest to track bees this Easter. As lockdown restrictions ease across Wales, scientists at Cardiff University are asking the public to take part in a biodiversity monitoring project called Spot-a-bee.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 01.04.2021
Distant stars spiralling towards a collision give clues to the forces that bind sub-atomic particles
Bath space scientists have found a new way to probe the internal structure of neutron stars, giving clues about the makeup of matter at an atomic level. Last updated on Thursday 1 April 2021 Space scientists at the University of Bath have found a new way to probe the internal structure of neutron stars, giving nuclear physicists a novel tool for studying the structures that make up matter at an atomic level.

Environment - 31.03.2021
Lakes on Greenland Ice Sheet can drain huge amounts of water, even in winter
Lakes on Greenland Ice Sheet can drain huge amounts of water, even in winter
Using satellite data to 'see in the dark', researchers have shown for the first time that lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet drain during winter, a finding with implications for the speed at which the world's second-largest ice sheet flows to the ocean.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.03.2021
Gene therapy technique shows potential for repairing damage caused by glaucoma and dementia
Gene therapy technique shows potential for repairing damage caused by glaucoma and dementia
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have shown in animal studies that gene therapy may help repair some of the damage caused in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as glaucoma and dementia. Their approach demonstrates the potential effectiveness of gene therapy in polygenic conditions - that is, complex conditions with no single genetic cause.

Health - 31.03.2021
Can drinking cocoa protect your heart when you're stressed'
Can drinking cocoa protect your heart when you’re stressed’
Increased consumption of flavanols - a group of molecules occurring naturally in fruit and vegetables - could protect people from mental stress-induced cardiovascular events such as stroke, heart disease and thrombosis, according to new research. Researchers have discovered that blood vessels were able to function better during mental stress when people were given a cocoa drink containing high levels of flavanols than when drinking a non-flavanol enriched drink.

Health - 31.03.2021
Low to moderate alcohol consumption linked to lower risk of cataracts
Low to moderate alcohol consumption appears to be associated with a lower risk of requiring surgery for cataracts, finds a new study led by UCL and Moorfields researchers. The study, published today in Ophthalmology (the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology), was observational and does not definitively prove a direct causal effect.

Health - 31.03.2021
Home monitoring methods can help reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19 for NHS patients and staff
A new study led by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) BRACE and RSET Rapid Evaluation Centres and undertaken by researchers at UCL and the University of Birmingham say NHS staff feel remote home monitoring methods enable improved patient care and also reduce the risk of staff and patients contracting Covid-19.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.03.2021
African elephants only occupy a fraction of their potential range | University of Oxford
African elephants only occupy a fraction of their potential range | University of Oxford
Many wildlife species are threatened by shrinking habitat. But according to new research published today, the potential range of African elephants could be more than five times larger than its current extent. Because of human pressure over the last two millenia, African elephants have suffered dramatic population declines, and their range has shrunk to just 17 percent of what it could be, say researchers - including members of Oxford University's Department of Zoology - behind the new study in Current Biology .

Health - Pharmacology - 31.03.2021
Targeting essential protein could lead to new breast cancer treatments
A protein frequently found in high levels in breast cancer cells helps tumours to survive and grow, and could be targeted with a new type of drug that is already being tested for other cancers, new research reveals. The new study confirms that a protein called MCL-1 helps breast cancer cells survive, by hindering cells' natural ability to die through a process called apoptosis, and proves that breast cancer tumours in fact rely on this protein to help them grow more aggressively, by blocking this natural cellular self-destruct function.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 31.03.2021
More support needed for two children in every class with hidden language disorder
Research from Bath psychologists suggests schools could introduce quieter alternatives to playtime to help children with Developmental Language Disorder. Last updated on Wednesday 31 March 2021 Children with a common but regularly undiagnosed disorder affecting their language and communication are likely to be finding the transition back to school post-lockdown harder than most, according to a team of psychologists.

Social Sciences - 31.03.2021
Social work guidance to protect adults living with dementia from abuse
New guidance, authored by Dr Jeremy Dixon for the Department of Health & Social Care, aims to improve supported decision-making for adults with dementia. Last updated on Thursday 1 April 2021 Fresh guidance published by the Department of Health & Social Care, authored by the University of Bath, aims to protect people living with dementia suffering or at risk of abuse, by involving them more actively in their care plans.

Life Sciences - 31.03.2021
Analysis: Are we more closely related to starfish or insects’
Professor Max Telford and Dr Paschalia Kapli (both UCL Biosciences) discuss the difficulties of tracing the vertebrate origins of humans, and say the long held view that vertebrates are closely related to echinoderms such as starfish may be misplaced. How humans evolved from the very first animals over the last 600 million years is an endlessly fascinating question.

Environment - 31.03.2021
Extra 100 million years before Earth saw permanent oxygen rise
Extra 100 million years before Earth saw permanent oxygen rise
The permanent rise of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere, which fundamentally changed the subsequent nature of Earth's habitability, occurred much later than thought, according to new research. And the study, from an international team led by the University of Leeds and including researchers from the University of California-Riverside, Harvard University, the University of Southern Denmark and the University of St Andrews, also provides an explanation for some of the most extreme climate episodes to have affected the Earth, when the planet was repeatedly covered with ice.

Health - 30.03.2021
Widespread use of control measures such as facemasks is vital to suppress the pandemic as lockdown lifts, say scientists
A new mathematical model suggests that the easing of lockdown must be accompanied by wider and more effective use of control measures such as facemasks even with vaccination, in order to suppress COVID-19 more quickly and reduce the likelihood of another lockdown. More effective use of control measures like facemasks and handwashing would help us to stop the pandemic faster.

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