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Health - Life Sciences - 10.04.2020
Rapid lab-free COVID-19 test delivers results in just over an hour
Rapid lab-free COVID-19 test delivers results in just over an hour
A new DnaNudge Lab-in-Cartridge test is beginning evaluation on patients ' requiring no lab and significantly reducing waits for results. Imperial College London's Regius Professor of Engineering, Chris Toumazou FRS, is working with clinical researchers to test a rapid, lab-free PCR test that detects COVID-19 and delivers results in just over an hour.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.04.2020
Researchers develop new coronavirus test for frontline NHS workers
Researchers develop new coronavirus test for frontline NHS workers
A new test for infection with SARS-CoV2 that which inactivates the virus at the point of sampling, has been developed by a team of researchers at the Cambridge Institute for Therapeutic Immunology and Infectious Disease (CITIID). It is now being used to test and screen frontline NHS staff at a Cambridge hospital.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.04.2020
3D printed corals could improve bioenergy and help coral reefs
3D printed corals could improve bioenergy and help coral reefs
Researchers have designed bionic 3D-printed corals that could help energy production and coral reef research. We hope that our technique will be scalable so it can ultimately reduce greenhouse gas emissions that are responsible for coral reef death Daniel Wangpraseurt Researchers from Cambridge University and University of California San Diego have 3D printed coral-inspired structures that are capable of growing dense populations of microscopic algae.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.04.2020
COVID-19: genetic network analysis provides 'snapshot' of pandemic origins
COVID-19: genetic network analysis provides ’snapshot’ of pandemic origins
Study charts the "incipient supernova" of COVID-19 through genetic mutations as it spread from China and Asia to Australia, Europe and North America. Researchers say their methods could be used to help identify undocumented infection sources. Phylogenetic network analysis has the potential to help identify undocumented COVID-19 infection sources Peter Forster Researchers from Cambridge, UK, and Germany have reconstructed the early "evolutionary paths" of COVID-19 in humans - as infection spread from Wuhan out to Europe and North America - using genetic network techniques.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 09.04.2020
’Freeze frame’ chemistry to unlock drugs of the future
Researchers are taking snapshots of chemical reactions in a trillionth of a second in the hope of developing the next generation of antibiotics and anti-viral drugs. Using state-of-the-art laser technology, scientists at Cardiff University and the Rosalind Franklin Institute are creating ‘freeze frame movies' of chemical reactions, with a starring role for a specific enzyme that could be used to make new drugs that are active against viruses, such as COVID-19.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.04.2020
Vexing Nemo: motorboat noise makes clownfish stressed and aggressive
Vexing Nemo: motorboat noise makes clownfish stressed and aggressive
Working on the reefs around Moorea in French Polynesia, an international team of scientists exposed 40 pairs of clownfish to recordings of natural reef sounds or motorboat noise for up to two days. Motorboat noise caused clownfish to hide in the protective tentacles of their host anemone, move less into open water to feed and to be more aggressive towards domino damselfish that also reside in the anemone.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.04.2020
Climate change could cause sudden biodiversity losses worldwide
A warming global climate could cause sudden, potentially catastrophic losses of biodiversity in regions across the globe throughout the 21st century, finds a new UCL-led study. The findings and suggests that the first waves could already be happening. The study's lead author, Dr Alex Pigot (UCL Centre for Biodiversity & Environment Research): "We found that climate change risks to biodiversity don't increase gradually.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.04.2020
Red wine component mimics oestrogen to support healthy ageing
Some dietary compounds such as resveratrol, which is commonly found in red wine, can mimic oestrogen to activate anti-ageing proteins called sirtuins, finds a new UCL study. Some dietary compounds such as resveratrol, which is commonly found in red wine, can mimic oestrogen to activate anti-ageing proteins called sirtuins, finds a new UCL study.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.04.2020
Insect wings hold antimicrobial clues for improved medical implants
Insect wings hold antimicrobial clues for improved medical implants
U sing a range of advanced imaging tools, functional assays and proteomic analyses , a study by the University of Bristol has identified new ways in which nanopillars can damage bacteria. These important findings will aid the design of better antimicrobial surfaces for potential biomedical applications such as medical implants and devices that are not reliant on antibiotics.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2020
UK genome analysis has important implications for COVID-19 clinical trials
Researchers from Bristol's School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine have been growing the live human SARS-CoV-2 virus in a controlled lab to investigate what the virus is doing inside monkey and human cells. Using state-of-the-art scientific techniques, the team isolated parts of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to find out how the virus instructs the cell to make virus proteins, which can either be used to form virus particles or slow our immune response.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.03.2020
Identification of viruses and bacteria could be sped up through computational methods
Identification of viruses and bacteria could be sped up through computational methods
A new multinational study has shown how the process of distinguishing viruses and bacteria could be accelerated through the use of computational methods. The researchers, led by the University of Edinburgh, with colleagues from Cambridge, London, Slovenia and China, used a combination of theoretical and experimental methods to develop a strategy to detect the DNA of infectious diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.03.2020
Universities join forces to help pandemic fight
Scientists at the Universities of Dundee are Glasgow are combining their expertise to aid the global battle against coronavirus. The collaboration brings world-leading researchers at Medical Research Council-funded units at both institutions together to generate biological tools that will enable them to study the virus and identify ways of defeating it.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists document seasonal migrations of fish across the deep-sea floor for the first time
Scientists have, for the first time, documented seasonal migrations of fish across the seafloor in deep-sea fish, revealing an important insight that will further scientific understanding of the nature of our planet. The study - published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology and led by the University of Glasgow and Nova Southeastern University in Florida - analysed over seven years of deep-sea photographic data from West Africa, linking seasonal patterns in surface-ocean productivity with observed behavioural patterns of fishes at 1500 metres.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists predict the size of plastics animals can eat
A team of scientists at Cardiff University has, for the first time, developed a way of predicting the size of plastics different animals are likely to ingest. The researchers, from the University's Water Research Institute, looked at the gut contents of more than 2,000 animals to create a simple equation to predict the size of a plastic item an animal can eat, based on the length of its body.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.03.2020
Marine species respond as oceans warm
A global analysis of over 300 marine species spanning more than 100 years, shows that mammals, plankton, fish, plants and seabirds have been changing in abundance as our climate warms. At the cool edge of species ranges marine life is doing well as warming opens up habitat that was previously inaccessible, while at the warmer edge species are declining as conditions become too warm to tolerate.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.03.2020
Pablo Escobar's hippos might have helped to restore local ecological diversity
Pablo Escobar’s hippos might have helped to restore local ecological diversity
Hippos imported into Colombia by drug lord Pablo Escobar could have helped to restore ecological diversity in the surrounding area, according to a new study. An international group of researchers, including Dr Chris Sandom and Owen Middleton at the University of Sussex, conducted a worldwide analysis comparing the ecological traits of introduced herbivores, like Escobar's hippos, to those of the past.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.03.2020
Urban birds need to be smart or fast-breeding
Urban birds need to be smart or fast-breeding
To thrive in urban environments, birds need to either have large brains, or breed many times over their life, according to a new study involving UCL. The study, published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution , suggests that birds have two alternative strategies for coping with the difficulties of humanity's increasingly chaotic cities.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.03.2020
Bristol develops photosynthetic proteins for more sustainable solar-powered devices
Bristol develops photosynthetic proteins for more sustainable solar-powered devices
The initiative is part of a broader effort in the field of synthetic biology to use proteins in place of man-made materials which are often scarce, expensive and can be harmful to the environment when the device becomes obsolete. The aim of the study, published today , was the development of “chimera” photosynthetic complexes that display poly-chromatic solar energy harvesting.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.03.2020
Brain reading technology could help development of brainwave-controlled devices
A new method to accurately record brain activity at scale has been developed by researchers at UCL, the Crick, and Stanford University. The technique could lead to new medical devices to help amputees, people with paralysis or people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.03.2020
In pictures: the Imperial lab developing a COVID-19 vaccine
In pictures: the Imperial lab developing a COVID-19 vaccine
Scores of researchers are racing to create a virus to combat the coronavirus COVID-19. Professor Robin Shattock and his team in Imperial College London's Department of Infectious Disease developed a candidate vaccine within 14 days of getting the sequence from China. They have been testing the vaccine on animals since 10 February and plan to move to clinical trials in the summer.
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