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Life Sciences - Environment - 30.11.2020
New aggressive alga threatening the health of Caribbean coral reefs
New aggressive alga threatening the health of Caribbean coral reefs
Hurricanes, pollution, disease, bleaching and the effects of an increasingly warmer planet are all negatively impacting the health of coral reefs around the world. However, those in the Caribbean are facing a new threat - an aggressive, golden-brown, crust-like alga that is rapidly overgrowing shallow reefs.

Environment - Innovation - 25.11.2020
Scottish scientists join call for decade-long deep sea study
The deep seas - vast expanses of water and seabed hidden more than 200 metres below the ocean surface to depths up to 11,000 metres - are recognised globally as an important frontier of science and discovery. But despite the fact they account for around 60% of Earth's surface area, large areas remain completely unexplored, yet the habitats they support impact on the health of the entire planet.

Health - Environment - 23.11.2020
Big cats and small dogs: solving the mystery of canine distemper in wild tigers
If you think getting your cat to the veterinarian is tricky, a new study - led by Cornell Wildlife Health Center, the University of Glasgow and the Wildlife Conservation Society; and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - has revealed that vaccination of endangered Amur (Siberian) tigers is the only practical strategy to protect them from a dangerous disease in their natural habitat in the Russian Far East.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.11.2020
Firth of Clyde a 'key source' of juvenile whiting, supplying the wider Scottish west coast and Irish Sea fisheries
Firth of Clyde a ’key source’ of juvenile whiting, supplying the wider Scottish west coast and Irish Sea fisheries
Scientists have discovered that the Firth of Clyde is an important source of juvenile whiting to the wider Scottish west coast waters, in new research likely to be important for fisheries management. In a new joint study, between the University of Glasgow and Marine Scotland Science published today in Communications Biology, researchers found that as juvenile whiting grow to become adults some cross the fish stock boundary between the Irish Sea and waters to the west of Scotland.

Materials Science - Environment - 17.11.2020
New green materials could power smart devices using ambient light
New green materials could power smart devices using ambient light
Researchers have developed environmentally friendly materials that could harvest enough energy from indoor light to power wireless smart devices. We are increasingly using more smart devices like smartphones, smart speakers, and wearable health and wellness sensors in our homes, offices, and public buildings.

Environment - Veterinary - 13.11.2020
Widespread contamination of English rivers with pesticides commonly used as flea treatments
Widespread contamination of English rivers with pesticides commonly used as flea treatments
New research reveals widespread contamination of English rivers with pesticides commonly used as flea treatments Researchers at the University of Sussex have found widespread contamination of English rivers with two neurotoxic pesticides commonly used in veterinary flea products: fipronil and the neonicotinoid imidacloprid.

Environment - 09.11.2020
Scientists unravel how and why Amazon trees die
The capacity of the Amazon forest to store carbon in a changing climate will ultimately be determined by how fast trees die - and what kills them. Now, a huge new study has unravelled what factors control tree mortality rates in Amazon forests and helps to explain why tree mortality is increasing across the Amazon basin.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 06.11.2020
Climate change and food demand could shrink species' habitats by almost a quarter by 2100
Climate change and food demand could shrink species’ habitats by almost a quarter by 2100
Mammals, birds and amphibians worldwide have lost on average 18% of their natural habitat range as a result of changes in land use and climate change, a new study has found. In a worst-case scenario this loss could increase to 23% over the next 80 years.   We found that the higher the carbon emissions, the worse it gets for most species in terms of habitat loss.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 30.10.2020
New drone technology advances volcanic monitoring
New drone technology advances volcanic monitoring
Specially-adapted drones, developed by an international team involving scientists from the University of Cambridge, are transforming how we forecast eruptions by allowing close-range measurements of previously inaccessible and hazardous volcanoes These aerial measurements are pushing the frontiers of the current state-of-the-art in volcano monitoring Emma Liu The team, involving 20 researchers from seven countries, used long-range drones kitted out with a range of lightweight sensors to study the Manam volcano - one of the most active volcanoes in Papua New Guinea.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 30.10.2020
New drone technology improves ability to forecast volcanic eruptions
Specially-adapted drones developed by a UCL-led international team have been gathering data from never-before-explored volcanoes that will enable local communities to better forecast future eruptions. The cutting-edge research at Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea is improving scientists' understanding of how volcanoes contribute to the global carbon cycle, key to sustaining life on Earth.

Environment - Economics / Business - 26.10.2020
Globalised economy making water, energy and land insecurity worse: study
Globalised economy making water, energy and land insecurity worse: study
The first large-scale study of the risks that countries face from dependence on water, energy and land resources has found that globalisation may be decreasing, rather than increasing, the security of global supply chains. By quantifying the pressures that our consumption places on water, energy and land resources in far-off corners of the world, we can also determine how much risk is built into our interconnected world Oliver Taherzadeh Countries meet their needs for goods and services through domestic production and international trade.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.10.2020
Large tides may have been a key factor in the evolution of bony fish and tetrapods
Large tides may have been a key factor in the evolution of bony fish and tetrapods
Pioneering research, published in  Proceedings of the Royal Society A , into ancient tides during the Late Silurian - Devonian periods (420 million years ago - 380 million years ago), suggests that large tides may have been a key environmental factor in the evolution of bony fish and early tetrapods, the first vertebrate land-dwellers.

Environment - 21.10.2020
Birmingham-led research promises water boost for farmers in India
University of Birmingham water experts have designed a low-energy, high-efficiency means of purifying water in India's rural farming communities, which could allow farmers to safely use high-saline groundwater and wastewater to grow crops. Working in the Gujarat region of India, scientists in the Birmingham-led INDIA-H20 project have used emerging membrane technologies that allow saline groundwater and domestic/industrial wastewaters to be safely and efficiently recycled.

Environment - 19.10.2020
Paper recycling must be powered by renewables to save climate
The study as current methods rely on fossil fuels and electricity from the grid. The researchers modelled various scenarios for increasing recycling of wastepaper by 2050 and the impact this would have on greenhouse gas emissions. They found that if all wastepaper was recycled, emissions could increase by 10%, as recycling paper tends to rely more on fossil fuels than making new paper.

Environment - Career - 19.10.2020
Climate scientists fly more than other researchers, first global study suggests
Climate change researchers, especially professors, fly more than other researchers - but are also more likely to have taken steps to reduce or offset their flying, a new study has found. The large, international survey of more than 1,400 university researchers was carried out by the UK Centre for Climate and Social Transformation (CAST), which is coordinated by Cardiff University.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.10.2020
Deep sea coral time machines reveal ancient CO2 burps
Deep sea coral time machines reveal ancient CO2 burps
Analysis of the fossil remains of deep-sea corals (pictured here) were used to examine the history of the oceans and connections to global climate. Dann Blackwood, USGS Deep-sea corals Dann Blackwood, USGS Deep-sea corals Dann Blackwood, USGS 17 October 2020 The fossilised remains of ancient deep-sea corals may act as time machines providing new insights into the effect the ocean has on rising CO2 levels, according to new research carried out by the Universities of Bristol, St Andrews and Nanjing and published in Science Advances.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.10.2020
Ground-breaking discovery finally proves rain really can move mountains
Ground-breaking discovery finally proves rain really can move mountains
First and corresponding author Dr Byron Adams in the steep terrain of the Greater Himalaya, central Bhutan. Second author Professor Kelin Whipple Looking upstream within a tributary of the Wang Chu, southwestern Bhutan. Dr Byron Adams The Ta Dzong overlooking the Paro Valley, western Bhutan. Dr Byron Adams 16 October 2020 A pioneering technique which captures precisely how mountains bend to the will of raindrops has helped to solve a long-standing scientific enigma.

Environment - Economics / Business - 16.10.2020
Cooling: hidden threat for climate change and sustainable goals
Past research suggests growing international demand for cooling has the potential to drive one of the most substantial increases in greenhouse gas emissions in recent history. A new study sets out a framework for delivering sustainable cooling. It also examines cooling needs in the context of sustainable development, and finds that this is a global blind spot.

Environment - 15.10.2020
Laser technology measures biomass in world’s largest trees
Laser technology has been used to measure the volume and biomass of giant Californian redwood trees for the first time, records a new study by UCL researchers. The technique, published in Nature Scientific Reports journal, offers unprecedented insights into the 3D structure of trees, helping scientists to estimate how much carbon they absorb and how they might respond to climate change.

Environment - Health - 13.10.2020
Soluble iron in skies over China’s cities could create health risk - study
Industrial and vehicle pollution in the skies above East China's major cities is boosting the amount of atmospheric soluble iron particles - creating health risks for citizens, a new study reveals. Research indicates that acidic gases emitted from power generation, industry and vehicle exhausts are helping to dissolve insoluble iron particles in Beijing, Handan, Zhengzhou and Hangzhou.
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