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Results 1 - 9 of 9.


Health - Computer Science - 22.05.2020
New contact tracing app for COVID-19 spread designed to protect privacy
A new app developed at Imperial College London aims to protect privacy whilst trying to minimise coronavirus spread. As part of their efforts to slow the outbreak of coronavirus , international governments, research institutions and industry are developing contact tracing apps to record interactions between people.

Physics - Computer Science - 20.05.2020
Quantum leap: Bristol's photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
Quantum leap: Bristol’s photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
The development of quantum technologies promises to have a profound impact across science, engineering and society. Quantum computers at scale will be able to solve problems intractable on even the most powerful current supercomputers, with many revolutionary applications, for example, in the design of new drugs and materials.

Computer Science - Pharmacology - 18.05.2020
AI successfully used to identify different types of brain injuries
AI successfully used to identify different types of brain injuries
Researchers at Imperial College London and Cambridge have developed an AI algorithm that can detect and identify different types of brain injuries. The researchers found that their machine learning algorithm was able to detect, segment, quantify and differentiate between types of brain lesions using images of CT scans.

Computer Science - 06.04.2020
AI techniques used to improve battery health and safety
AI techniques used to improve battery health and safety
Researchers have designed a machine learning method that can predict battery health with 10x higher accuracy than current industry standard, which could aid in the development of safer and more reliable batteries for electric vehicles and consumer electronics. The researchers, from Cambridge and Newcastle Universities, have designed a new way to monitor batteries by sending electrical pulses into them and measuring the response.

Physics - Computer Science - 13.03.2020
New microscopy technique helps pictures tell a thousand words
A new imaging method combined with machine learning uncovers previously hidden information in micrographs of biological cells to reveal quantitative information of gene expression levels. Researchers from the University of Glasgow's James Watt School of Engineering and School of Computing Science describe in a paper published today how they have used image analysis and machine learning as a tool to directly determine the gene activity in single cells.

Computer Science - 17.02.2020
South West to host Europe’s largest Arm supercomputer
The region's leading universities, the GW4 Alliance, together with the Met Office, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), and partners, have been awarded £4.1 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to create Isambard 2, the largest Arm-based supercomputer in Europe.

Health - Computer Science - 11.02.2020
Skin cancer diagnosis apps are unreliable and poorly regulated
Smartphone apps used as ‘early warning systems' for skin cancer are poorly regulated and frequently cannot be relied upon to produce accurate results, according to new analysis by experts at the University of Birmingham. Skin cancer detection apps are designed to ensure that the right people seek medical attention by providing a risk assessment of a new or changing mole.

Computer Science - 10.02.2020
New system to detect cyber-attacks on smart devices in the home
A novel system capable of detecting and classifying cyber-attacks on smart devices around our homes has been developed by experts at Cardiff University. The system can distinguish between malicious or benign activity and detect attacks on devices such as the Amazon Echo Dot and Apple TV with a 90 per cent accuracy.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 16.01.2020
Artificial intelligence used to predict 3D structure of proteins
A deep learning system can predict the structure of a protein using its genetic sequence more accurately than any previous modelling system, according to a study by researchers at DeepMind and UCL. Nearly every function our body performs relies on proteins. Predicting the intricate 3D structure of a protein is important because its structure largely determines its function and, once the structure is known, scientists can develop drugs that target this unique shape.

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