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Results 81 - 100 of 298.


Chemistry - Materials Science - 02.03.2020
New tools show a way forward for large-scale storage of renewable energy
New tools show a way forward for large-scale storage of renewable energy
A technique based on the principles of MRI and NMR has allowed researchers to observe not only how next-generation batteries for large-scale energy storage work, but also how they fail, which will assist in the development of strategies to extend battery lifetimes in support of the transition to a zero-carbon future.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.02.2020
Unravels how our immune system deals with fungal and viral infections
The body's immune response to fungal infections changes when a patient is also infected by a virus, according to new research which investigated the two types of infection together for the first time. The study, carried out by researchers at the University of Birmingham, The Pirbright Institute and University College London , sheds fresh light on the immune system's ability to deal with co-infection.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 28.02.2020
Why is there any matter in the universe at all? New Sussex study sheds light
Why is there any matter in the universe at all? New Sussex study sheds light
Neutron's ‘electric dipole moment' smaller than ever predicted New international standard for detail and sensitivity has been set Scientists one step closer to understanding the mystery of matter in the Universe Scientists at the University of Sussex have measured a property of the neutron - a fundamental particle in the universe - more precisely than ever before.

Health - 28.02.2020
Wine glass size may influence how much you drink in restaurants
Wine glass size may influence how much you drink in restaurants
The size of glass used for serving wine can influence the amount of wine drunk, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge, funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). The study found that when restaurants served wine in 370ml rather than 300ml glasses they sold more wine, and tended to sell less when they used 250ml glasses.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 27.02.2020
Learning difficulties due to poor connectivity, not specific brain regions
Learning difficulties due to poor connectivity, not specific brain regions
Different learning difficulties do not correspond to specific regions of the brain, as previously thought, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. Instead poor connectivity between 'hubs' within the brain is much more strongly related to children's difficulties. Between 14-30% of children and adolescents worldwide have learning difficulties severe enough to require additional support.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 27.02.2020
Turning back the clock on blue carbon tolls a warning bell for the environment
A new study of a Scottish sea loch which reconstructs 5,000 years of its climate history is casting doubt on hopes that 'blue carbon' could help slow the rate of global heating. http://media.gla.ac.uk/web/news/campusenews/bluecarbon.mp4 'Blue carbon' is the term used to describe atmospheric carbon which has been captured by underwater vegetation and stored under the sea bed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 27.02.2020
Large exoplanet could have the right conditions for life
Large exoplanet could have the right conditions for life
Astronomers have found an exoplanet more than twice the size of Earth to be potentially habitable, opening the search for life to planets significantly larger than Earth but smaller than Neptune.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.02.2020
Gene therapy shows promise in tackling common cause of childhood blindness
Gene therapy shows promise in tackling common cause of childhood blindness
The results of a first-in-human clinical trial of gene therapy to treat a common cause of genetic blindness have shown partial reversal of sight loss in some patients. X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, caused by mutations in RPGR gene, is the most common cause of blindness in young people. The inherited mutations lead to degeneration of light sensitive cells (photoreceptors) beginning in early childhood leading to severe sight loss.  Until now there has been no treatment for this disease.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.02.2020
Major studies to explore the use of mobile phones on health
Researchers are leading extensive studies into the health impacts of mobile phone use. Professor Paul Elliott, Chair in Epidemiology and Public Health Medicine at Imperial College London, is leading two studies to investigate whether there is a link between the use of mobile phones and long-term health problems in adults and adolescents.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.02.2020
Mobile phone use triggers frequent headaches and lack of sleep
Extensive use of mobile phone is linked to increased headaches and poor sleep, says an Imperial expert. Professor Paul Elliott, Chair in Epidemiology and Public Health Medicine at Imperial College London, is leading two studies to investigate whether there is a link between the use of mobile phones and long-term health problems in adults and adolescents.

Health - 26.02.2020
We should have less fear of radiation, says Imperial researcher
People's fear of radiation is sometimes out of proportion to the risks it poses, said an Imperial expert at a public healthcare event. Professor Gerry Thomas, Chair in Molecular Pathology at Imperial College London and the Chernobyl Tissue bank, has led research looking at the health impacts of radiation.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.02.2020
Global group to investigate links between rare genomic disorders and psychiatric conditions
Rare genetic disorders caused by small changes in a person's genetic make-up affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people globally - but they are a major cause of developmental and psychiatric conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability.

Life Sciences - 26.02.2020
Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats - who use echolocation to detect them. The findings, published in Royal Society Interface today [26 February], reveal the moths, who are unable to hear the ultrasonic calls of bats, have evolved this clever defensive strategy to help it survive.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.02.2020
400 Marsquakes detected by UK sensors in one year
400 Marsquakes detected by UK sensors in one year
The NASA InSight lander, which is supported by the UK Space Agency, has recorded 400 likely 'Marsquakes' in the first year of its mission. The seismic vibrations on Mars were detected by a set of silicon sensors developed in the UK for InSight's Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS). Imperial College London, Oxford University, University of Bristol and STFC RAL Space worked in partnership, with £4 million in funding from the UK Space Agency, to develop three sensors which are sensitive enough to detect motion at sub-atomic scales.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 25.02.2020
Fur-friendly 'wearable for pets' developed at Imperial
Fur-friendly ’wearable for pets’ developed at Imperial
Imperial College researchers London have invented a new health tracking sensor for pets and people that monitors vital signs through fur or clothing Our stretchy, flexible invention heralds a whole new type of sensor that can track the health of animals and humans alike over fur or clothing. Dr Firat Guder Department of Bioengineering The new type of sensor, which can detect vital signs like heart and breathing rates through fur and up to four layers of clothing, could help make everyday wearables for pets and livestock a reality.

Pharmacology - Health - 25.02.2020
Engaging with schizophrenia - experts argue for new approaches to treatment
A better understanding of the lived experience of people with schizophrenia would enable clinicians to help patients live with their condition, alongside treating symptoms with medication and psychotherapy, say experts at the University of Birmingham. According to researchers at the University, this approach would involve developing an understanding of ‘self-disturbance' in schizophrenia - in which patients' sense of connection to themselves and to their actions is disrupted.

Media - Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Analysis: How do those bereaved by suicide respond to media reports?
Guidelines on reporting suicide are aimed at preventing further suicides and minimising distress to the bereaved. Here Dr Alexandra Pitman (UCL Psychiatry) writes about her research looking at how relatives of suicide victims respond to news, and speaks to others in the field. You are a junior reporter on a busy local newspaper.

Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Life expectancy not improving for first time in 100 years
For the first time in more than 100 years life expectancy has failed to increase across the country, and for the poorest 10% of women it has actually declined, according to a new report from Sir Michael Marmot and the UCL Institute of Health Equity. 10 years on since Sir Marmot first published the Marmot Review, the new report confirms that over the last decade health inequalities have widened overall, and the amount of time people spend in poor health has increased since 2010.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.02.2020
Shows how glacier algae creates dark zone at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Shows how glacier algae creates dark zone at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet
New research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has revealed new insights into how the microscopic algae that thrives along the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet causes widespread darkening. This darkening is critically important as darker ice absorbs more sunlight energy and melts faster, accelerating the overall melting of the ice, which is the single largest contributor to global sea level rises.

Astronomy / Space Science - Electroengineering - 24.02.2020
Quakes, dust devils and midnight magnetic pulses: findings from a year on Mars
Quakes, dust devils and midnight magnetic pulses: findings from a year on Mars
InSight's Imperial-designed instrument has revealed that Mars trembles more often, but also more mildly, than expected. Detecting hundreds of marsquakes on a planet 140 million miles from Earth, using sensors developed in the UK, is an important achievement. Amanda Solloway UK Science Minister An international team of scientists led by NASA created Mars InSight , the first mission to study the deep interior of Mars , to generate unprecedented data about the planet's inner structure.

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