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Results 81 - 100 of 194.


Life Sciences - 30.01.2020
Specific genes which affect learning ability in Down’s syndrome
Professor Matthew Walker (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) explains: "We have shown - for the first time - that different and multiple genes are contributing to the various cognitive problems associated with Down's syndrome." Down's syndrome is a genetic disorder that occurs in about 1 in 800 births.

Life Sciences - 30.01.2020
New target identified for repairing the heart after heart attack
An immune cell is shown for the first time to be involved in creating the scar that repairs the heart after damage Billions of cardiac muscle cells are lost during a heart attack. The human heart cannot replenish these lost cells, so the default mechanism of repair is to form a cardiac scar. While this scar works well initially to avoid ventricular rupture, the scar is permanent, so it will eventually lead to heart failure and the heart will not be able to pump as efficiently as before the damage caused by heart attack.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2020
Protective cells could cut risk of lung cancer for ex-smokers
Protective cells in the lungs of ex-smokers could explain why quitting smoking reduces the risk of developing lung cancer, finds new research co-led by UCL and the Wellcome Sanger Institute. The study, funded by Cancer Research UK, discovered that people who had stopped smoking had more genetically healthy lung cells, which have a much lower risk of developing into cancer.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.01.2020
MRI tool can diagnose difficult cases of ovarian cancer
MRI tool can diagnose difficult cases of ovarian cancer
Researchers have developed a new MRI tool that can identify cases of ovarian cancer which are difficult to diagnose using standard methods. The tool has produced encouraging results in a clinical study and its impact on management and outcomes of women with ovarian cancer will now be evaluated in a major trial at 18 hospitals in the UK, including Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 30.01.2020
Clearest and most detailed images yet of the sun revealed
The clearest and most detailed images of the Sun have been captured by the largest telescope in the world. Just released first images and videos from the US National Science Foundation's (NSF) Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope reveal unprecedented detail of the Sun's surface, with experts saying it will enable a new era of solar science and a leap forward in understanding the Sun and its impacts on our planet.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 30.01.2020
Telescope reveals most detailed images of the Sun
The largest telescope in the world, which was built by a team involving UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory engineers and scientists, has captured the clearest and most detailed images of the Sun. The first images and videos from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope reveal unprecedented detail of the Sun's surface, with experts saying it will enable a new era of solar science and a leap forward in understanding the Sun and its impacts on our planet.

Social Sciences - Health - 30.01.2020
Insights into child mental health in Scotland
National adolescent study reveals insights into child mental health in Scotland A national report, carried out every four years, has provided insights into child mental health in Scotland. The 2018 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in Scotland, led by researchers at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow and funded by NHS Health Scotland, provides data on the health and wellbeing of the nation's young people.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.01.2020
Releasing artificially-infected mosquitoes could cut global dengue cases by 90%
Releasing artificially-infected mosquitoes could cut global dengue cases by 90%
Releasing mosquitoes infected with a type of bacteria that prevents them transmitting dengue could cut cases of the disease by as much as 90 per cent. This is the finding of a team of international scientists, led by Imperial College London , and including researchers from the University of California and University of Florida.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.01.2020
Novel insight into chromosome 21 and its effect on Down syndrome
A UCL-led research team has, for the first time, identified specific regions of chromosome 21, which cause memory and decision-making problems in mice with Down syndrome, a finding that provides valuable new insight into the condition in humans. Most people have 46 chromosomes in each cell, divided into 23 pairs: people with Down syndrome (DS) have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which carries over 200 genes.

Social Sciences - 29.01.2020
Brain networks come 'online' during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life
Brain networks come ’online’ during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life
New brain networks come 'online' during adolescence, allowing teenagers to develop more complex adult social skills, but potentially putting them at increased risk of mental illness, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) .

Pharmacology - Health - 29.01.2020
New guidelines will improve treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism
Radioactive iodine is to be recommended as the frontline treatment for patients with thyroid gland overactivity caused by conditions such as Graves' disease, following an evidence review led by University of Birmingham researchers. Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces excess amounts of thyroid hormones.

History / Archeology - 29.01.2020
Iron Age ’warrior’ burial uncovered in West Sussex
A richly-furnished grave belonging to an Iron Age 'warrior' buried 2,000 years ago has been uncovered in West Sussex by UCL archaeologists. Iron weapons had been placed inside the grave, including a sword in a highly-decorated scabbard and a spear. The burial was discovered during an excavation commissioned by Linden Homes, who are developing a site on the outskirts of Walberton, near Chichester, to create 175 new homes.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.01.2020
Drinking alcohol during pregnancy: #DRYMESTER the only safe approach
Drinking alcohol during pregnancy leads to poorer cognitive functioning in children, according to the most comprehensive review on the issue to date. The University of Bristol research published today [29 January] in the International Journal of Epidemiology, reviewed 23 published studies on the topic and found evidence that drinking in pregnancy could also lead to lower birthweight.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.01.2020
Gut bacteria linked to personality
Sociable people have a higher abundance of certain types of gut bacteria and also more diverse bacteria, an Oxford University study has found. Dr Katerina Johnson of Oxford University's Department of Experimental Psychology has been researching the science of that 'gut feeling' - the relationship between the bacteria living in the gut (the gut microbiome) and behavioural traits.

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.01.2020
Hotspots for hedgehog road deaths revealed in new research co-authored by Sussex professor
Hotspots for hedgehog road deaths revealed in new research co-authored by Sussex professor
A new paper co-authored by a University of Sussex Professor has revealed when, where and why hedgehog roadkill is most likely to occur, with the outskirts of Leeds, Manchester, Stoke on Trent and Birmingham emerging as particular blackspots for one of Britain's most iconic mammals. Charities involved in the research hope the results will help to identify measures that can be taken to protect hedgehogs, such as reducing road speeds in hotspot areas.

Pedagogy - Health - 28.01.2020
The Daily Mile? programme could help schools’ tackle childhood obesity
A study evaluating the effectiveness of the widely used 'Daily Mile' intervention in schools to tackle childhood obesity has found that the benefits are small, and may be greater in girls than boys. The study concluded that whilst interventions such as The Daily Mile are not going to reduce childhood obesity alone, they could be an important part of a wider population strategy to tackling this challenge.

Pedagogy - 27.01.2020
Ban on smoking in cars cut child exposure to cigarette smoke
A public ban on smoking in cars in England and Wales has led to fewer children being exposed to cigarette smoke, according to new analysis. England and Wales banned smoking in cars carrying children in 2015, with Scotland introducing a ban the following year. But to date, the impact of the legislation on children's exposure to cigarette smoke has been unclear.

Innovation - 27.01.2020
Patterns of thinning of Antarctica's biggest glacier are now the opposite of what was previously observed
Patterns of thinning of Antarctica’s biggest glacier are now the opposite of what was previously observed
They found that the pattern of thinning is evolving in complex ways both in space and time with thinning rates now highest along the slow-flow margins of the glacier, while rates in the fast-flowing central trunk have decreased by about a factor of five since 2007. This is the opposite of what was observed prior to 2010.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.01.2020
Researchers showcase projects to tackle major health problems
Researchers showcase projects to tackle major health problems
Nineteen Imperial fellows showcased research projects aimed at tackling global health problems and disease challenges at a special celebration event. The Imperial 4i Clinician Scientist Training Scheme Celebration event took place last month at Imperial's South Kensington Campus. Fellows on the programme presented and showcased posters of a range of research projects icluding work in cardiology, rheumatology, infectious diseases and microbiology to an audience of senior academics and clinicians at Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.01.2020
Rewilding the Arctic could stop permafrost thaw and reduce climate change risks
The wide-scale introduction of large herbivores to the Arctic tundra to restore the 'mammoth steppe' grassland ecosystem and mitigate global warming is economically viable, suggests a new paper from the University of Oxford. Grazing animals such as horses and bison are known to engineer the landscape around them, for example suppressing the growth of trees by trampling or eating saplings.

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