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Results 61 - 80 of 924.


Health - Pharmacology - 09.09.2020
Patients set to benefit from new guidelines on Artificial Intelligence health solutions
Patients could benefit from faster and more effective introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) innovations to diagnose and treat disease - thanks to the first international standards for reporting of clinical trials for AI. As evaluation of health interventions involving machine learning or other AI systems moves into clinical trials, an international group has developed guidelines aiming to improve the quality of these studies and ensure that they are reported transparently.

Economics / Business - Environment - 08.09.2020
Multinationals’ supply chains account for a fifth of global emissions
A fifth of carbon dioxide emissions come from multinational companies' global supply chains, according to a new study led by UCL and Tianjin University that shows the scope of multinationals' influence on climate change. The study, published , maps the emissions generated by multinationals' assets and suppliers abroad, finding that the flow of investment is typically from developed countries to developing ones - meaning that emissions are in effect outsourced to poorer parts of the world.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.09.2020
New model predicts oesophageal cancer eight years early for half of all patients
New model predicts oesophageal cancer eight years early for half of all patients
DNA from tissue biopsies taken from patients with Barrett's oesophagus - a risk factor for oesophageal cancer - could show which patients are most likely to develop the disease eight years before diagnosis, suggests a study led by researchers at the University of Cambridge and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI).

Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.09.2020
'Wild West' mentality lingers in US mountain regions
’Wild West’ mentality lingers in US mountain regions
Distinct psychological mix associated with mountain populations is consistent with the theory that harsh frontiers attracted certain personalities.  This psychological fingerprint for mountainous areas may be an echo of the personality types that sought new lives in unknown territories Friedrich Götz When historian Frederick Jackson Turner presented his famous thesis on the US frontier in 1893, he described the "coarseness and strength combined with acuteness and acquisitiveness" it had forged in the American character.

Pharmacology - Health - 07.09.2020
Genetic study of proteins is a breakthrough in drug development for complex diseases
Genetic study of proteins is a breakthrough in drug development for complex diseases
An innovative genetic study of blood protein levels, led by researchers in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (MRC-IEU) at the University of Bristol, has demonstrated how genetic data can be used to support drug target prioritisation by identifying the causal effects of proteins on diseases. Working in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies, Bristol researchers have developed a comprehensive analysis pipeline using genetic prediction of protein levels to prioritise drug targets, and have quantified the potential of this approach for reducing the failure rate of drug development.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.09.2020
Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020. The process which makes this possible has eluded scientists for many decades, but research led by the University of Bristol has made a breakthrough in understanding how memories can be so distinct and long-lasting without getting muddled up.

Psychology - 07.09.2020
Impact of returning to school on adolescent mental health the subject of a new study
Researchers from Oxford University have found that, during lockdown, teenagers mental health is struggling compared to their parents. The Oxford ARC study, launched in May, has found that teenagers consistently report higher levels of anxiety and depression than parents. Around 35% of teenagers are saying they feel lonely often or most of the time, compared to 17% of parents.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.09.2020
Raised blood pressure and diabetes alter brain structure to slow thinking speed and memory
In a new study, neuroscientists at Oxford University have found that raised blood pressure and diabetes in mid-life alter brain structure to slow thinking speed and memory. Looking at results from 22,000 volunteers in the UK Biobank who underwent brain scanning, the scientists found that raised blood pressure and diabetes significantly impaired the brain's cognitive functions, specifically the performance of thinking speed and short-term memory.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.09.2020
Scientists create blueprint to vaccinate in Bangladesh and beyond
Scientists create blueprint to vaccinate in Bangladesh and beyond
Scientists will work in Bangladesh to create a blueprint to help ensure that medics can get a COVID-19 vaccine to everyone who needs it across the Global South. Universal vaccine access is already a major challenge in low-income countries, due to the lack of robust refrigerated cooling networks especially to remote communities.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.09.2020
Genetic links to drug and alcohol use among young people
Young people who are genetically predisposed to risk-taking, low extraversion and schizophrenia are more likely to use alcohol, cigarettes, cannabis, or other illicit drugs, according to a new UCL-led study. The researchers say that the findings, published in Addiction Biology , are in line with the notion that people who are more vulnerable to psychopathology or certain personality traits are more inclined to try several types of drugs or use them to 'self-medicate'.

Psychology - 04.09.2020
Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone’s motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study. The researchers found that large disparities in rewards offered for the same task reduce people's happiness, which in turn reduce their willingness to work, in the study published in PLOS One .

Health - Pharmacology - 03.09.2020
Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and drug resistance are extremely common in patients living with HIV who are admitted to hospital in Malawi, according to new research published in Lancet HIV .

Life Sciences - 03.09.2020
Contribute to apple database and identify what type of tree is growing in your garden
Scientists from the University of Bristol are asking people in the local area who have -unknown- varieties of apple trees in their garden, allotment or neighbourhood to collect a few leaves and send them in to them. It's all part of ongoing research carried out by Professor Keith Edwards and his team from the University's School of Biological Sciences which has developed a genotyping system - similar to human DNA fingerprinting - which can rapidly and easily identify apple varieties.

Astronomy / Space Science - 03.09.2020
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
The most massive gravitational-wave source yet has been detected - a binary black hole merger which produced a blast equal to the energy of eight suns, sending shockwaves through the universe. Gravitational waves are produced when an extreme cosmic event occurs somewhere in the universe and, like dropping a rock in a pond, these events ripple across the cosmos, bending and stretching the fabric of space-time itself.

Health - 03.09.2020
Tracing apps can save lives at all levels of uptake
The  latest research findings  from a team of modellers and epidemiologists at Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Medicine and Google Research suggest digital contact tracing, such as that based on Google and Apple's  Exposure Notification System (ENS) , can help to control the epidemic at low levels of app uptake.

Life Sciences - 03.09.2020
True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
To date only the length of the legendary giant shark Megalodon had been estimated but now, a new study led by the University of Bristol and Swansea University has revealed the size of the rest of its body, including fins that are as large as an adult human. There is a grim fascination in determining the size of the largest sharks, but this can be difficult for fossil forms where teeth are often all that remain.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.09.2020
Where do black-hole parents meet? LIGO/Virgo may provide answers
Astrophysicists investigating gravitational-wave data from the far reaches of the Universe believe they may have found an explanation for a curious signal detected from the collision of two black holes. The signal, named GW190412, was picked up by the LIGO / Virgo detectors, which are set up to observe gravitational waves - the ripples in space and time caused by huge astronomical objects - and use them to make new discoveries about our Universe.

Physics - Computer Science - 02.09.2020
Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
The world is one step closer to having a totally secure internet and an answer to the growing threat of cyber-attacks, thanks to a team of international scientists who have created a unique prototype which could transform how we communicate online. The invention led by the University of Bristol, revealed today in the journal Science Advances , has the potential to serve millions of users, is understood to be the largest-ever quantum network of its kind, and could be used to secure people's online communication, particularly in these internet-led times accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.09.2020
A gravitational
A gravitational "bang": LIGO and Virgo discover the most massive gravitational-wave source yet
The LIGO and Virgo Collaboration, which includes scientists from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Birmingham, have reported the discovery of a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves. The signal, labelled GW190521, was detected on May 21, 2019, with the LIGO and Virgo detectors.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.09.2020
Zooming in on dark matter
Zooming in on dark matter
Our cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe - which could help us find the real thing in space. Using a supercomputer simulation of the universe they achieved a zoom equivalent to being able to see a flea on the surface of the Moon. This meant they could make detailed pictures and analyses of hundreds of virtual dark matter haloes from the very largest (galaxy clusters) to the tiniest (about the same as Earth's mass).

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