news 2020


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Results 41 - 60 of 66.


Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.01.2020
Feeling full happens in the brain as well as the stomach: Sussex professor explains in new podcast
Feeling full happens in the brain as well as the stomach: Sussex professor explains in new podcast
Professor Martin Yeomans ' research is helping food producers address the growing problem of obesity. In the latest episode of Impacted , the University of Sussex podcast series about research for real change, Yeomans explains how sharing his research on satiety with industry helps manufacturers create new food products that satisfy consumers and reduce the risk of overeating.

Life Sciences - 09.01.2020
Protein supplement could help weight loss after exercise
Combining an appetite-supressing supplement with moderate exercise could help to burn fat faster, according to new research. The findings, published in the journal Metabolism , build on previous work looking at a supplement called inulin-propionate ester (IPE), which may help to reduce cravings for high-calorie foods and boost rates of fat oxidisation - the process by which the body ‘burns' fat.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.01.2020
Scientists spot spectacular neutron star collision
Scientists spot spectacular neutron star collision
The spectacular collision of two neutron stars over 500 million light-years away from Earth has been spotted through the detection of gravitational waves. The neutron stars - remnants of dying stars that undergo catastrophic explosions as they collapse at the end of their lives - merged into an unusually large single object that was around 3.4 times the mass of our sun, the team report.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.01.2020
Scientists use ancient marine fossils to unravel long-standing climate puzzle
Scientists use ancient marine fossils to unravel long-standing climate puzzle
During this period, known as the middle Miocene Climate Optimum, global temperatures were as much as 3 to 4 degrees warmer than today's average temperatures, similar to estimates for 2100. The position of the continents were similar to today and the seas were flourishing with life. This period, which occurred between 15 and 17 million years ago, has puzzled geologists for decades as they have tried to explain the initial cause of the global warming and the environmental conditions that existed on Earth afterwards.

Environment - 08.01.2020
Sea-ice-free Arctic makes permafrost vulnerable to thawing
New research led by scientists at the University of Oxford's Department of Earth Sciences, and at the Geological Survey of Israel, provides evidence from Siberian caves suggesting that summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an essential role in stabilising permafrost and its large store of carbon.

Chemistry - 08.01.2020
Catalytic protocells get zingy
Catalytic protocells get zingy
From the synthesis of drugs to the generation of plastics, catalysts - substances that speed up chemical reactions without being consumed - are the backbone of many industrial processes. Catalysts come in many forms such as inorganic nanoparticles, organic liquids and aqueous enzymes, and can be linked to solid surfaces to increase their performance.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2020
Key to Iron Age ’Heslington brain’ preservation
The 2,600-year-old Heslington brain, discovered in 2008 near York in the UK, was probably so well-preserved due to tightly folded brain proteins, finds a new UCL-led study. The brain matter was the only soft tissue that remained in the skull, which dated from around 673-482 BCE. The new findings, published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface , suggest that the first few months after the person's death may have been key to the extraordinary degree of brain preservation.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2020
2,600-year-old brain preserved with protein folding
The 2,600-year-old Heslington brain, discovered in 2008 near York in the UK, was likely so well-preserved due to tightly folded brain proteins, finds a new UCL-led study. The brain matter was the only soft tissue that remained in the skull, which dated from around 673-482 BCE. The new findings, published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface , suggest that the first few months after the person's death may have been key to the extraordinary degree of brain preservation.

Materials Science - 08.01.2020
Early humans optimised stone tool use at Tanzania’s Olduvai Gorge
Early Stone Age populations living up to 1.8 million years ago made complex decisions in selecting different types of stone to optimise a variety of cutting tools, according to a new study by UCL, University of Kent and the Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spain. The study, published in the Journal of Royal Society Interface , offers new insight into the complexity of stone tool use, design and production.

Health - 07.01.2020
Immune cell discovery opens door to new powerful cancer therapies
Scientists at UCL have identified how a subset of immune cells are activated to kill cancerous cells, a finding in mice which could hold the key to new powerful therapies against cancer. This new study built on previous research*, also led by Professors Sergio Quezada and Karl Peggs (both UCL Cancer Institute), which found that following immunotherapy some CD4+ T cells, traditionally thought to be 'helper' and 'regulator' immune cells, become cytotoxic and directly engage with and kill cancer cells.

Physics - 07.01.2020
Smoking may leave a legacy of increased pain even after quitting
Former daily smokers report higher levels of pain than people who have never smoked daily, and their pain levels are similar to people who currently smoke daily, according to a new UCL study The paper, published today in Addictive Behaviors, analysed data from just over 220,000 people in the UK aged 16+ who had never smoked daily, used to smoke daily, or currently smoked daily.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2020
Detailed genetic study provides most comprehensive map of risk to date of breast cancer risk
Detailed genetic study provides most comprehensive map of risk to date of breast cancer risk
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Pharmacology - Health - 07.01.2020
Brain tumour research could help future precision medicine
New research on brain tumours could improve patient diagnosis and treatment options as part of a precision medicine approach. Brain tumours are the leading cause of cancer deaths in children and adults under the age of 40, with 16,000* people in the UK diagnosed with a brain tumour each year. The study led by the Brain Tumour Research Centre at the University of Bristol in collaboration with the Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB) at Queen's University Belfast investigated the genetics of brain tumours.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.01.2020
Marathon running makes arteries younger and lowers blood pressure
Marathon running makes arteries younger and lowers blood pressure
The new year means it's time to set resolutions for 2020, and new research led by UCL and Barts Health NHS Trust suggests running a marathon for the first time could have several health benefits. The study, published by the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found that for first-time marathon runners, training and completion of the marathon resulted in reductions in blood pressure and aortic stiffening in healthy participants that were equivalent to a four-year reduction in vascular age.

Astronomy / Space Science - 07.01.2020
LIGO-Virgo Network catches another neutron star collision
LIGO-Virgo Network catches another neutron star collision
On April 25, 2019, the gravitational-wave observatory network that includes the National Science Foundation's LIGO and the European Virgo detectors picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars. Astrophysicists at the University of Birmingham have contributed to a new study confirming that this event, which was witnessed by only one detector in the network, LIGO Livingston, was indeed likely the result of a merger of two neutron stars.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2020
Exercising with ’feel fuller’ supplement could boost fat burn
Moderate-intensity exercise combined with a supplement which suppresses appetite could boost the rate at which fat is burned in the human body, new research suggests. The new findings, published in the journal Metabolism, build on promising previous studies which showed that a substance known as inulin-propionate ester (IPE) reduced cravings for high-calorie foods and boosted rates of fat oxidisation - the process by which the body 'burns' fat.

Religions - Business / Economics - 07.01.2020
Not tonight boys; how Papal visits could leave Italian men out of luck for more than a year
A visit by the Pope can renew sufficient religious observance among Italian women to withhold sex from their partners for more than a year afterwards, a new University of Sussex study shows. Papal visits to Italian provinces lead to a subsequent decrease in abortions of up to 20% with its impact felt for up to 14 months after, new research by economists Dr Vikram Pathania and Dr Egidio Farina has revealed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.01.2020
UofG gravitational astrophysicists celebrate neutron star collision observation
The publication of a new observation of gravitational wave data is being celebrated by researchers from the University of Glasgow's Institute for Gravitational Research, who helped support the international collaborations which made the detection possible. On April 25, 2019, the observatory known as LIGO Livingston picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars - only the second time this type of event has ever been observed by gravitational wave astronomy.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 06.01.2020
New way to sustainably make chemicals by copying nature's tricks
New way to sustainably make chemicals by copying nature’s tricks
Researchers have copied the way organisms produce toxic chemicals without harming themselves, paving the way for greener chemical and fuel production. The new technique, pioneered by Imperial College London scientists, could reduce the need to use fossil fuels to create chemicals, plastics, fibres and fuels.

Life Sciences - Environment - 06.01.2020
Protecting two key regions in Belize could save threatened jaguar, say scientists
Protecting two key regions in Belize could save threatened jaguar, say scientists
Scientists studying one of the largest populations of jaguars in Central Belize have identified several wildlife corridors that should be protected to help the species survival. The study, led by the University of Bristol and the American Museum of Natural History and published in BMC Genetics, provide a new insight into where conservation efforts should be concentrated.

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