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Results 41 - 60 of 895.


Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.09.2020
Genetic links to drug and alcohol use among young people
Young people who are genetically predisposed to risk-taking, low extraversion and schizophrenia are more likely to use alcohol, cigarettes, cannabis, or other illicit drugs, according to a new UCL-led study. The researchers say that the findings, published in Addiction Biology , are in line with the notion that people who are more vulnerable to psychopathology or certain personality traits are more inclined to try several types of drugs or use them to 'self-medicate'.

Psychology - 04.09.2020
Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone’s motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study. The researchers found that large disparities in rewards offered for the same task reduce people's happiness, which in turn reduce their willingness to work, in the study published in PLOS One .

Health - Pharmacology - 03.09.2020
Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and drug resistance are extremely common in patients living with HIV who are admitted to hospital in Malawi, according to new research published in Lancet HIV .

Life Sciences - 03.09.2020
Contribute to apple database and identify what type of tree is growing in your garden
Scientists from the University of Bristol are asking people in the local area who have -unknown- varieties of apple trees in their garden, allotment or neighbourhood to collect a few leaves and send them in to them. It's all part of ongoing research carried out by Professor Keith Edwards and his team from the University's School of Biological Sciences which has developed a genotyping system - similar to human DNA fingerprinting - which can rapidly and easily identify apple varieties.

Astronomy / Space Science - 03.09.2020
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
The most massive gravitational-wave source yet has been detected - a binary black hole merger which produced a blast equal to the energy of eight suns, sending shockwaves through the universe. Gravitational waves are produced when an extreme cosmic event occurs somewhere in the universe and, like dropping a rock in a pond, these events ripple across the cosmos, bending and stretching the fabric of space-time itself.

Health - 03.09.2020
Tracing apps can save lives at all levels of uptake
The  latest research findings  from a team of modellers and epidemiologists at Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Medicine and Google Research suggest digital contact tracing, such as that based on Google and Apple's  Exposure Notification System (ENS) , can help to control the epidemic at low levels of app uptake.

Life Sciences - 03.09.2020
True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
To date only the length of the legendary giant shark Megalodon had been estimated but now, a new study led by the University of Bristol and Swansea University has revealed the size of the rest of its body, including fins that are as large as an adult human. There is a grim fascination in determining the size of the largest sharks, but this can be difficult for fossil forms where teeth are often all that remain.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.09.2020
Where do black-hole parents meet? LIGO/Virgo may provide answers
Astrophysicists investigating gravitational-wave data from the far reaches of the Universe believe they may have found an explanation for a curious signal detected from the collision of two black holes. The signal, named GW190412, was picked up by the LIGO / Virgo detectors, which are set up to observe gravitational waves - the ripples in space and time caused by huge astronomical objects - and use them to make new discoveries about our Universe.

Physics - Computer Science - 02.09.2020
Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
The world is one step closer to having a totally secure internet and an answer to the growing threat of cyber-attacks, thanks to a team of international scientists who have created a unique prototype which could transform how we communicate online. The invention led by the University of Bristol, revealed today in the journal Science Advances , has the potential to serve millions of users, is understood to be the largest-ever quantum network of its kind, and could be used to secure people's online communication, particularly in these internet-led times accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.09.2020
A gravitational
A gravitational "bang": LIGO and Virgo discover the most massive gravitational-wave source yet
The LIGO and Virgo Collaboration, which includes scientists from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Birmingham, have reported the discovery of a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves. The signal, labelled GW190521, was detected on May 21, 2019, with the LIGO and Virgo detectors.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.09.2020
Zooming in on dark matter
Zooming in on dark matter
Our cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe - which could help us find the real thing in space. Using a supercomputer simulation of the universe they achieved a zoom equivalent to being able to see a flea on the surface of the Moon. This meant they could make detailed pictures and analyses of hundreds of virtual dark matter haloes from the very largest (galaxy clusters) to the tiniest (about the same as Earth's mass).

Health - Pharmacology - 02.09.2020
Analysis of seven trials finds that corticosteroids reduce risk of death by 20 per cent in critically ill COVID-19 patients
Corticosteroids reduce the risk of death among critically ill COVID-19 patients by 20 per cent, an analysis of seven trials published today [2 September] in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found. The results of three of the trials included in the meta-analysis are also published in JAMA today.

Astronomy / Space Science - Innovation - 02.09.2020
Most massive gravitational wave signal yet poses new mysteries
The most massive gravitational-wave source yet has been detected - a binary black hole merger, which produced a blast equal to the energy of eight Suns, sending shockwaves through the universe. The detection provides answers to some fundamental questions about how black holes are formed - and poses some intriguing new ones.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 02.09.2020
Low carb diets often influenced by internet information and do not work for all
Low carbohydrate diets are often driven by beliefs that are influenced by internet resources, and do not represent a one-size-fits all approach to dieting. In a new study led by the University of Glasgow and published today in Nature Scientific Reports , researchers have provided further insights into the motivations for following low carb diets and the experiences of current and past dieters.

Health - 02.09.2020
Pregnant women with COVID-19 are less likely to show common symptoms, may be at higher risk of intensive care admission and could give birth early, new international study finds
The study analysed the outcomes of 11,432 pregnant and recently pregnant women from the USA, Europe, Central and South-East Asia and South America. Pregnant women, hospitalised with COVID-19 are less likely to manifest common virus symptoms like fever or muscle pain than non-pregnant women of the same age, and may be at an increased risk of intensive care admission, an international study into the impacts of COVID on pregnancy has found.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.09.2020
Combining PCR and antibody tests at point of care dramatically increases COVID-19 detection in hospitalised patients
Combining PCR and antibody tests at point of care dramatically increases COVID-19 detection in hospitalised patients
A Cambridge hospital has piloted the use of combined rapid point-of-care nucleic acid and antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection after researchers at the University of Cambridge showed that this approach was superior to virus detection alone for diagnosing COVID-19 disease. PCR and antibody tests both have limitations because of the nature of coronavirus infection and how our body responds.

Health - 02.09.2020
Handgrip strength shown to identify people at high risk of type 2 diabetes
Handgrip strength shown to identify people at high risk of type 2 diabetes
A simple test such as the strength of your handgrip could be used as a quick, low-cost screening tool to help healthcare professionals identify patients at risk of type 2 diabetes. In new research, scientists at the universities of Bristol and Eastern Finland measured the muscular handgrip strength of 776 men and women without a history of diabetes over a 20-year period and demonstrated that the risk of type 2 diabetes was reduced by around 50 per cent for every unit increase in handgrip strength value.

Social Sciences - Religions - 01.09.2020
Scriptures rarely a significant motivating factor behind violence, say researchers
Scriptures rarely a significant motivating factor behind violence, say researchers
Many people misunderstand the relationship between religion, scripture and violence, a new book argues. Some people worry that scriptures such as the Qur'an and the Bible fan the flames of violence in the world today, while others insist that they are inherently peaceful. According to an international team of researchers, the reality may be more complicated than either set of people think.

Social Sciences - Health - 01.09.2020
Endometriosis more common in teenage girls than previously thought
Teenage girls are just as likely to suffer with endometriosis as adult women, a finding which UCL and University of Birmingham researchers say is surprising and could help doctors provide better treatments for younger patients. Endometriosis is a debilitating condition, caused by excessive growth of the womb's tissue lining, which presents with pain in the lower abdomen, typically around the time of a period.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 01.09.2020
Radiocarbon dating and CT scans reveal Bronze Age tradition of keeping human remains
Radiocarbon dating and CT scans reveal Bronze Age tradition of keeping human remains
Using radiocarbon dating and CT scanning to study ancient bones, researchers have uncovered for the first time a Bronze Age tradition of retaining and curating human remains as relics over several generations. While the findings, led by the University of Bristol and published in the journal Antiquity , may seem eerie or even gruesome by today's convention, they indicate a tangible way of honouring and remembering known individuals between close communities and generations some 4,500 years ago.

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