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Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 14.10.2019
Q&A: How exploring Venus could unlock our understanding of Earth's future
Q&A: How exploring Venus could unlock our understanding of Earth’s future
As the EnVision mission to Venus is preparing for its planned launch in 2032, we speak to the Imperial researcher who is a part of the Science Team. With its extremely high temperatures and surface veiled by thick clouds, Venus represents an unusual example of planet formation and evolution. Once thought to be a tropical paradise, it was only in the 1960s that scientists were able to observe its hostile environment.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 24.09.2019
'Treasure trove' of quake clues could be unearthed by wavy new technique
’Treasure trove’ of quake clues could be unearthed by wavy new technique
Imperial geologists have improved the mapping of underwater rocks, which could lead to better understanding of earthquakes and tsunami hazards. Their technique combines traditional acoustic mapping with a newer method called 2D waveform inversion. This enhanced their view of rocks along a fault line - a break in the Earth's crust - off the east coast of New Zealand's North Island.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.09.2019
Identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
A new study, including scientists from Cardiff University and published today , discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories. If you walk from a river's source to its mouth, you walk a path that descends in elevation. In some rivers, this path will descend steeply out of the uplands, and then flatten out in the lowlands.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.09.2019
Identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and published , discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories. For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.09.2019
Europe's oldest lake traces 1.4 million years of Mediterranean climate
Europe’s oldest lake traces 1.4 million years of Mediterranean climate
New research by an international team of scientists, led by the University of Cologne and including the University of Bristol, has revealed a lake considered to be the oldest in Europe was first established 1.36 million years ago and has existed continuously ever since. Lake Ohrid, located at the border between the Republics of Albania and North Macedonia, is famous for its exceptional biodiversity, with more than 300 unique (endemic) animal and plant species.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 09.09.2019
First day of dinosaur extinction recorded in rocks at asteroid impact site
First day of dinosaur extinction recorded in rocks at asteroid impact site
Researchers probing the impact that wiped out the dinosaurs find evidence of wildfires and tsunami in the rocks at ground zero. An international team led by University of Texas and including Imperial College London researchers analysed more than 130 metres of rock that had built up over just one day - the day after the asteroid struck.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 05.09.2019
’Martian CSI’ reveals how asteroid impacts created running water under red planet
Dr Luke Daly, Research Associate in Solar System Science at the University of Glasgow's School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, holding a piece of a Martian nakhlite meteorite. Modern analysis of Martian meteorites has revealed unprecedented details about how asteroid impacts help create temporary sources of running water on the red planet.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 02.09.2019
Vintage film of Antarctic glaciers hints at early ice shelf collapse
Vintage film of Antarctic glaciers hints at early ice shelf collapse
Digitised archival film has revealed part of Thwaites Glacier is melting faster than thought, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected. Newly digitised vintage film has doubled how far back scientists can peer into the history of ice in Antarctica, and revealed that an ice shelf on Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is being thawed by a warming ocean more quickly than previously thought.

Earth Sciences - 27.08.2019
'Surrey swarm' earthquakes not caused by nearby oil extraction, says study
’Surrey swarm’ earthquakes not caused by nearby oil extraction, says study
Imperial College London research has found no evidence that oil extraction caused recent earthquakes known as the 'Surrey swarm' in Surrey and Sussex. The series of 34 small earthquakes between April 2018 and May 2019 occurred within 10 km of two active oil extraction sites at Brockham and Horse Hill in Surrey.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 15.08.2019
Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth's carbon cycle
Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth’s carbon cycle
The Earth's carbon cycle is crucial in controlling the greenhouse gas content of our atmosphere, and ultimately our climate. Ice sheets which cover about 10 percent of our Earth's land surface at present, were thought 20 years ago to be frozen wastelands, devoid of life and with supressed chemical weathering - irrelevant parts of the carbon cycle.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 08.08.2019
Scientists uncover deep-rooted plumbing system beneath ocean volcanoes
Cardiff University scientists have revealed the true extent of the internal ‘plumbing system' that drives volcanic activity around the world. An examination of pockets of magma contained within crystals has revealed that the large chambers of molten rock which feed volcanoes can extend to over 16 km beneath the Earth's surface.

Earth Sciences - 30.07.2019
Predicting seismic activity at fracking sites to prevent earthquakes
Predicting seismic activity at fracking sites to prevent earthquakes
Scientists from the University of Bristol have found a more effective way to predict seismic activity at hydraulic fracturing sites, ensuring that potential earthquake activity remains within safe levels. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a technique designed to recover gas and oil from shale rock by drilling down into the earth and injecting a mixture of water and sand at high-pressure, creating fractures that allow the gas or oil to flow out.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 25.06.2019
Shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. The European Research Council-funded expedition on board the RSS Discovery took place during the summer of 2017.

Earth Sciences - 14.06.2019
How tides can trigger earthquakes
How tides can trigger earthquakes
An international team of scientists - including a volcanologist from the University of Bristol - have uncovered why underwater earthquakes are linked with the tides. Their study, published , investigates the inner workings of tidally triggered earthquakes and found that even the slightest stress can set off a tremor.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.05.2019
Source of new CFC emissions
Source of new CFC emissions
Since 2013, annual emissions of a banned chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) have increased by around 7 Australia and Switzerland. Last year, it was reported that emissions of one of the most important ozone depleting substances, CFC-11, had increased. This chemical was used primarily as a foaming agent for building insulation, refrigerators and other consumer products.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 02.05.2019
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 tonne giants so successful? A new study, published in Paleobiology, shows that their special adaptations in teeth and jaws and in their head crests were crucial, and provides new insights into how these innovations evolved.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.04.2019
Tracking the sources of plastic pollution
Plastic pollution in the world's oceans is now widely recognised as a major global challenge - but we still know very little about how these plastics are actually reaching the sea. A new global initiative, led by the University of Birmingham shows how focussing on rivers and river mouths can yield vital clues about how we might manage this plastic crisis.

Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
Volcano cliffs can affect monitoring data
New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and co-authored by the University of Bristol reveals that sharp variations of the surface of volcanoes can affect data collected by monitoring equipment. The surfaces of many volcanoes feature steep walls or cliffs. These are often part of calderas - large craters left by a previous collapse - but can also be caused by the volcano ‘rifting' - or splitting - or sector collapse, when part of the side of the volcano slides away.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 13.03.2019
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge
Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain - with people and animals travelling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals. The study, led by Dr Richard Madgwick of Cardiff University, is the most comprehensive to date and examined the bones of 131 pigs, the prime feasting animals, from four Late Neolithic (c.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 06.03.2019
Fossilised palm leaves give new insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet
Fossilised palm leaves give new insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet
A team of scientists from the UK and China have uncovered new evidence, using recently-discovered 25-million-year-old fossilised palm leaves, that Tibet's geography was not as 'high and dry' as previously thought. The new research, co-authored by academics from the University of Bristol's School of Geographical Sciences , suggests that central Tibet must have been no higher than 2.3km with large lakes fringed with subtropical vegetation and deep, hidden valleys.

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