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Chemistry - Materials Science - 12.08.2019
Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives
Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives
An international team of scientists, including a professor of chemistry from the University of Bristol, has worked out a way to improve energy storage devices called supercapacitors, by designing a new class of detergents chemically related to laxatives. Their paper, published today , explains why these detergents, called ionic liquids, are better electrolytes than current materials and can improve supercapacitors.

Chemistry - Physics - 06.08.2019
Artificial tongue could have whisky counterfeiting licked
An artificial 'tongue' which can taste subtle differences between drams of whisky could help cut down on the trade in counterfeit alcohol, scientists say. In a new paper published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry's journal Nanoscale, Scottish engineers describe how they built the tiny taster, which exploits the optical properties of gold and aluminium to test the tipples.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.07.2019
Researchers build artificial cells that sense and respond to their environment
Imperial College London scientists have created artificial cells that mimic biological cells by responding to a chemical change in their surroundings. The artificial cells could be used to sense changes in the body and respond by releasing drug molecules, or to sense and remove harmful metals in the environment.

Chemistry - 25.07.2019
Shape shifting protocells hint at the mechanics of early life
Shape shifting protocells hint at the mechanics of early life
Inspired by the processes of cellular differentiation observed in developmental biology, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Bristol have demonstrated a new spontaneous approach to building communities of cell-like entities (protocells) using chemical gradients.

Chemistry - 13.06.2019
Experiencing corruption makes you more likely to protest against it... up to a point
Why do some people take to the streets to protest against corruption in their society.. and others don't? Researchers from the Centre for the Study of Corruption at the University of Sussex have found that people who experience corruption first hand are more likely to protest, but only up to the point where it becomes routine.

Chemistry - 20.05.2019
More detailed picture of Earth’s mantle
The chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is a lot more variable and diverse than previously thought, a new study has revealed. According to a new analysis of cores drilled through the ocean crust, the mantle is made up of distinct sections of rock each with different chemical make-ups. The chemical composition of the mantle has been notoriously difficult to determine with a high degree of certainty because it is largely inaccessible.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 16.05.2019
Reveals what was on the menu for medieval peasants
Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered, for the first time, definitive evidence that determines what types of food medieval peasants ate and how they managed their animals. Using chemical analysis of pottery fragments and animal bones found at one of England's earliest medieval villages, combined with detailed examination of a range of historical documents and accounts, the research has revealed the daily diet of peasants in the Middle Ages.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.04.2019
Genetic defect causing intellectual disability discovered by Sussex scientists
Researchers at the University of Sussex have discovered a new genetic defect which causes a form of intellectual disability; a finding that will improve screening programmes and help to end a ‘diagnostic odyssey' for families across the globe. ‘X-linked syndromal intellectual disability' (XLID) affects around 3% of the global population with underlying genetic mutations being carried and passed on by unaffected females via their X-chromosome (human females possess two copies of the X chromosome, while males only have one).

Chemistry - 08.04.2019
Should the Periodic Table be upside down? - turning it through 180 degrees for a new perspective
Could turning the periodic table on its head make some important aspects easier to understand and enthuse more people to study chemistry? This question is posed in an article published today by chemists and psychologists at the University of Nottingham and Manchester and Liverpool universities. 2019 marks the 150 th anniversary of the first publication of Mendeleev's periodic table, which has become the accepted way of arranging the elements and of predicting new ones - but is there a better way of presenting this information for a new and in particular a young audience?

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.03.2019
Advanced chemistry made possible with new suite of start-of-the-art instruments
A new suite of advanced analytical instruments allowing precise chemical measurement has opened in Imperial's Molecular Sciences Research Hub. The Agilent Measurement Suite (AMS) is a collaboration between Agilent Technologies Inc and Imperial College London. Its analytical instruments will help researchers tackle problems in areas ranging from health and environment to energy and fundamental biology.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 04.03.2019
Protocells use DNA logic to communicate and compute
Protocells use DNA logic to communicate and compute
Researchers at the University of Bristol, Eindhoven University of Technology and Microsoft Research have successfully assembled communities of artificial cells that can chemically communicate and perform molecular computations using entrapped DNA logic gates. The work provides a step towards chemical cognition in synthetic protocells and could be useful in biosensing and therapeutics.

Chemistry - 04.03.2019
Could smart tattoos soon monitor your health?
Could smart tattoos soon monitor your health?
What do you get when you cross an engineer, a tattooist, and a dash of creativity? Smart tattoos, of course! It was exciting to see the concept played out on real skin at the Imperial Late - and our guests thought so too. Rosalia Moreddu Department of Chemical Engineering Artistic and scientific minds alike crowded to see tattooist Emma Wilkinson create an inky image of Imperial's very own Queen's Tower during February's Imperial Late.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 11.02.2019
Machine learning algorithm helps in the search for new drugs
Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm for drug discovery which has been shown to be twice as efficient as the industry standard, which could accelerate the process of developing new treatments for disease. The ability to fish out four active molecules from six million is like finding a needle in a haystack Alpha Lee The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, used their algorithm to identify four new molecules that activate a protein which is thought to be relevant for symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.02.2019
What does it take to make a better battery?
What does it take to make a better battery?
Cambridge researchers are working to solve one of technology's biggest puzzles: how to build next-generation batteries that could power a green revolution. A better battery could make all the difference. So what's holding up progress? Like many of us, when I wake up I reach for the phone on my bedside table and begin scrolling through Twitter, Instagram, email and news apps.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.01.2019
Fine tuning for clean energy
An international collaboration between researchers in Spain and Scotland has resulted in a new approach to improve the catalysts needed to carry out the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER). The reaction, in which water is transformed into hydrogen and oxygen, is a promising alternative to humanity's dependency on fossil fuels to satisfy energy requirements.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.01.2019
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a 1.6M project
Bringing electricity and chemistry together with a 1.6M project
Dr Clotilde Cucinotta is trying to solve the combined electrical and chemical problem, paving the way for next-generation energy sources. Dr Cucinotta joined Imperial this year, bringing an EPSRC grant of more than 1.6 million and a wide range of experience. We talked to her about her research, her journey so far, and why the Molecular Sciences Research Hub - the new home for Chemistry at Imperial's White City campus - is the best place to carry out her plans.

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Chemistry