News 2019


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Results 81 - 100 of 652.


Social Sciences - 21.08.2019
Young people with vision impairment face a cliff edge when leaving education to find work
The University of Birmingham have published the results of a Longitudinal Transition Study, funded by Thomas Pocklington Trust, following the experiences of young people with vision impairment from secondary school into further education and employment. Findings from the study show that whilst participants are inching closer to the labour market, common challenges were identified: Just over a fifth (21 per cent) are either ‘Not in Education, Employment, or Training' (NEET) or in long term unpaid voluntary work.

Health - 21.08.2019
’Physician Associates’ are an asset to hospital medical and surgical teams
The first study into the impact on the NHS of a new type of health worker in hospitals known as Physician Associates has found that they benefit medical and surgical teams and their patients over a wide range of specialities. Researchers found that Physician Associates safely supported the workloads of clinical teams and helped provide team continuity, as well as positively contributing to patient experience and patient journey.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.08.2019
’Key player’ identified in genetic link to psychiatric conditions
Scientists have identified a specific gene they believe could be a key player in the changes in brain structure seen in several psychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia and autism. The team from Cardiff University's Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute has found that the deletion of the gene CYFIP1 leads to thinning of the insulation that covers nerve cells and is vital for the smooth and rapid communications between different parts of the brain.

Electroengineering - 21.08.2019
Birmingham technology could defend UK against power blackouts
Technology developed at the University of Birmingham could protect the UK and other countries from national electricity blackouts. Britain has high-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) transmission links with neighbouring countries, including France, Ireland, Holland and Norway - an efficient way of transporting electricity, but vulnerable to alternating-current (AC) faults.

Health - 21.08.2019
UofG-led UK inflammatory arthritis research centre receives continued funding
A national centre researching inflammatory arthritis will receive continued funding of nearly 2m over five years from Versus Arthritis, it has been announced. The Research into Inflammatory Arthritis Centre Versus Arthritis (RACE) is a University of Glasgow-led collaboration between the Universities of Birmingham, Glasgow, Newcastle, and Oxford, led by Prof Iain McInnes, Director of the University's Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.08.2019
Aggressive brain tumour could be diagnosed with simple blood test
Aggressive brain tumour could be diagnosed with simple blood test
New research by Sussex scientists could be the first step towards developing a blood test to diagnose the most aggressive type of brain tumour, known as Glioblastoma. A team from Professor Georgios Giamas' lab at the University of Sussex has identified novel biomarkers within bodily fluids, which signal the presence of the tumour.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 19.08.2019
Lab-based dark energy experiment narrows search options for elusive force
An experiment to test a popular theory of dark energy has found no evidence of new forces, placing strong constraints on related theories. Dark energy is the name given to an unknown force that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate. It is very exciting to be able to discover something about the evolution of the universe using a table-top experiment in a London basement.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.08.2019
New tool could lead to improved care of patients living with artificial heart pump
New research led by the University of Birmingham and funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) could improve the lives of those living with an artificial heart pump. A left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a battery-operated, mechanical pump surgically implanted into patients who have end-stage heart failure.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.08.2019
New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle
New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle
New research led by academics at the University of Bristol Veterinary and Medical Schools used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.08.2019
Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study, in collaboration with Syngenta, found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.08.2019
Relaxing of regulations for regenerative medicines has cascading effect internationally, new research warns
Countries that relax regulations for regenerative medicines could be causing a downward spiral in international standards, according to new research published today. Researchers warn that if just one country decides to relax regulations in the field, a heightened sense of competition can spur others to do the same.

Social Sciences - 16.08.2019
’Follow the leader’ mentality a hallmark of gang rape
Physically violent rapes by multiple perpetrators are most frequently carried out by groups in which a strong leader is able to influence the behaviour of followers, new research shows. According to a study carried out by researchers at the University of Birmingham, Lancaster University and the University of Gloucestershire , the ways in which peer group members mimic the actions of group leaders is a key hallmark of these attacks.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 15.08.2019
Faulty gene leads to kidney disease
Faulty gene leads to kidney disease
New insights into why a faulty gene involved in a devastating form of a kidney condition called nephrotic syndrome leads to disease in some patients have been identified in new Kidney Research UK-funded research led by the University of Bristol. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), could pave the way for new ways to prevent or treat the condition, by revealing new targets to intervene in the process.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 15.08.2019
Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth's carbon cycle
Ice sheets impact core elements of the Earth’s carbon cycle
The Earth's carbon cycle is crucial in controlling the greenhouse gas content of our atmosphere, and ultimately our climate. Ice sheets which cover about 10 percent of our Earth's land surface at present, were thought 20 years ago to be frozen wastelands, devoid of life and with supressed chemical weathering - irrelevant parts of the carbon cycle.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2019
Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
New research by a University of Bristol palaeontology post-graduate student has revealed fresh insights into how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and how this tells us about its posture. Psittacosaurus was a very common dinosaur in the Early Cretaceous period - 125 million years ago - that lived in eastern Asia, especially north-east China.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.08.2019
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Sniffer dogs have been trained to detect ultra-low concentrations of bacteria which cause lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In a study by Imperial College London and the charity Medical Detection Dogs , researchers found that specially trained medical detection dogs were able to detect ultra-low concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), the most common cause of lung infection in people with CF.

Environment - 14.08.2019
New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling
New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling
A new review of silicon cycling in glacial environments, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, highlights the potential importance of glaciers in exporting silicon to downstream ecosystems. This, say the researchers, could have implications for marine primary productivity and impact the carbon cycle on the timescales of ice ages.

Computer Science / Telecom - Environment - 14.08.2019
GW4 supercomputer Isambard proves competitive
Researchers from GW4 universities Bristol and Cardiff assessed the performance of the GW4 Alliance Isambard supercomputer using an open-source Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code. The research team consisted of Unai Lopez Novoa, Data Innovation Research Institute; Pablo Ouro Barba, Cardiff School of Engineering; Dr James Price, University of Bristol and Professor Simon McIntosh Smith, the principal investigator for the Isambard project and a professor of high-performance computing at the University of Bristol.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 14.08.2019
Wind it up: Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand
Wind it up: Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand
Europe has the capacity to produce more than 100 times the amount of energy it currently produces through onshore windfarms, new analysis from the University of Sussex and Aarhus University has revealed. In an analysis of all suitable sites for onshore wind farms, the new study reveals that Europe has the potential to supply enough energy for the whole world until 2050.

Social Sciences - 14.08.2019
Uncovers how heavy social media use disrupts girls’ mental health
Frequent, heavy social media use can disrupt activities which promote positive mental health in girls, new research suggests. The findings come from the first comprehensive observational study into how very frequent use of platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat and WhatsApp may harm the mental health of young people.

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