News 2019


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Results 81 - 100 of 496.


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.07.2019
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Einstein's theory of General Relativity is world famous - but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form. Physicists at Durham University created huge supercomputer simulations of the universe to test an alternative theory. Our researchers found that f(R)-gravity - a so-called Chameleon Theory - could also explain the formation of structures in the cosmos.

Environment - 08.07.2019
Cave droplets provide window into past climates
The chemistry of drip waters that form stalagmites and stalactites in caves around the world have given researchers an insight into our past climate. In the first ever global analysis of cave drip water, an international team, led by Andy Baker at UNSW Australia and including scientists from Cardiff University, have explored how stalagmites and stalactites can show how groundwater resources have recharged in the past.

Health - 08.07.2019
Children from deprived areas six times more exposed to tobacco retail
Children from the most income deprived areas experienced similar exposure to tobacco retailing in one day as children from the least deprived areas experienced in one week. This was the finding of new collaborative research between the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh, which was published today in the journal Tobacco Control .The researchers used GPS-trackers to follow a group of almost 700 10-and-11-year-olds from across Scotland.

Pharmacology - Health - 04.07.2019
Aims to improve acne in women
A new study is looking for women with acne in Bristol to take part in a new clinical trial. Led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Southampton the study will investigate whether a drug called spironolactone can help improve acne in women. Spironolactone is usually given to people for high blood pressure.

Mathematics - 03.07.2019
Common scents don’t always make the best perfumes, suggests mathematical study
Perfumes that use the most popular scents do not always obtain the highest number of ratings, according to an analysis of online perfume reviews. A study of 10,000 perfumes and their online ratings reveals which odours are likely to bring success, with some surprising combinations providing a boost to ratings.

Innovation / Technology - Materials Science - 03.07.2019
New technique could brighten screens and make smartphone batteries last longer
Our future TV and smartphone screens could have double the energy efficiency, thanks to a technique invented by Imperial scientists. The pixels in many modern screens for TVs, smartphones, tablets, and laptops are lit by little devices called OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes). The findings could make screens of all kinds brighter, with better contrast and longer life.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Genes could play a role in tooth decay and gum disease
Tooth decay and gum disease impact on illness and healthcare spending, yet the role of genetics in dental problems is largely unknown. New research led by an international team, including researchers at the University of Bristol, suggests hereditary traits and factors such as obesity, education and personality could play a role in tooth decay and gum disease.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition | Imperial News | Imperial College London
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition | Imperial News | Imperial College London
A type of blood pressure lowering medication, called a calcium-channel blocker, may be linked with increased risk of bowel condition diverticulosis. This condition causes small bulges or pouches to appear in the lining of the intestine. Particularly affecting the elderly (as many as 65 per cent of over 85s may be affected), diverticulosis can in some cases can lead to a medical emergency if the pouches become infected or burst.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Scientists hijack bacteria's homing ability
Scientists hijack bacteria’s homing ability
In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. The findings, led by researchers at the University of Bristol and published in Chemical Science, could radically improve the treatment for cardiovascular disease, which causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK (1).

Health - Pharmacology - 03.07.2019
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
A crowdsourcing project which uses thousands of idling smartphones has helped to uncover anti-cancer properties of everyday foods and medicines. The project, led by researchers at Imperial College London, uses artificial intelligence to crunch huge volumes of data on a ‘cloud computing' network of smartphones while they charge overnight.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 02.07.2019
NHS must take urgent steps to defend against hackers, says White Paper
NHS must take urgent steps to defend against hackers, says White Paper
The NHS remains vulnerable to cyber-attack, and must take urgent steps to defend against threats which could risk the safety of patients. This is the finding of a new White Paper on NHS Cyber Security presented at the House of Lords. For the safety of patients, it is critical to ensure that the data, devices and systems that uphold our NHS and therefore our nation's health are secure.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 02.07.2019
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have found a promising new way to build the next generation of quantum simulators combining light and silicon micro-chips. In the roadmap to develop quantum machines able to compete and overcome classical supercomputers in solving specific problems, the scientific community is facing two main technological challenges.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.07.2019
Heart attack patients with diabetes may benefit from cholesterol-lowering drug
Injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes who have had a recent heart attack. Regular injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes and who have had a recent heart attack.

Pedagogy - 28.06.2019
Lack of data on missing migrant children leads to gaps in protection
Lack of data on missing migrant children leads to gaps in protection
A new report highlights the need for better data on migrant deaths and disappearances, particularly those of missing migrant children. This year's Fatal Journeys 4 report , by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and co-edited by University of Bristol academic Ann Singleton , focuses on missing migrant children, giving the growing number embarking on dangerous migrant journeys.

Health - Physics - 28.06.2019
Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Mini ’magic’ MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg. The team say the device - which uses so-called ‘magic angle' effect - could potentially help diagnose knee injuries more quickly, and more accurately. Knee injuries affect millions of people - and MRI scans are crucial to diagnosing the problem Dr Karyn Chappell Study author In a proof-of-concept study using animal knees, the results suggest the technology could be used to show all the structures of the knee.

Social Sciences - Politics - 27.06.2019
UK-first as 960,000 project explores integration in Bristol
A unique new project led by the University of Bristol has received a 960,000 boost to improve integration across Bristol by exploring how its citizens and communities share spaces and move around the city. University researchers on the 'Everyday Integration' project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), will work with Bristol City Council and 29 community partners to identify existing best-practice and better understand how to overcome the various barriers people currently face.

Pedagogy - 27.06.2019
Low UVB exposure in pregnancy linked with higher risk of learning disabilities
Too little sunlight - and specifically UVB exposure - in pregnancy has been linked with a higher risk of learning disabilities. In a new study looking at more than 422,500 school-age children from across Scotland, researchers found that low UVB exposure during pregnancy was associated with risk of learning disabilities.

Business / Economics - 27.06.2019
US immigration judges make harsher decisions when they ’feel the heat’
The hotter the day the more likely US immigration judges are to make harsher decisions - a new study by the universities of Ottawa, Canada and Sussex, England can reveal. The study, published in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics , analyses the impact of outdoor temperatures on high-stakes decisions made in 207,000 US immigration cases.

Health - 26.06.2019
Boosting the cancer-destroying ability of killer T-cells
More types of cancer could potentially be destroyed by patients' own immune cells, thanks to new research by Cardiff University. The team of researchers discovered that increasing the amount of the molecule L-selectin on T-cells can vastly improve their ability to fight solid tumours. Professor Ann Ager, from Cardiff University's Systems Immunity Research Institute, said: “These results mean that immunotherapy could be used to fight most cancers.

Life Sciences - 26.06.2019
Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more
Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more
A change is as good as a rest when it comes to remembering more, according to new research by neuroscientists at the University of Sussex. Dr Michael Crossley , Senior Research Fellow in Neuroscience, used pond snails to study the factors impacting on memory interference. He found that, when tasked with learning two similar things, snails were only able to store and recall the first memory.

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