News 2019


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Results 81 - 100 of 943.


Innovation - Social Sciences - 28.11.2019
Birmingham ’innovation hub’ boosts global clean energy prospects
British and German experts from industry and academia will create a new ‘Innovation Hub' based in Birmingham to deliver new approaches to energy and waste management that will benefit cities and communities in China and around the world. Energy experts from the University of Birmingham and Fraunhofer UMSICHT have renewed their Joint Research Platform set up in 2016 with plans to locate collaborative research in a new centre at the city's Tyseley Energy Park.

Veterinary Science - Environment - 28.11.2019
Unique sledge dogs helped the Inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
A unique group of dogs helped the Inuit conquer the tough terrain of the North American Arctic, a major new analysis of the remains of hundreds of animals shows. The results of a major new study on the remains of Artic sledge dogs reveals that the Inuit brought specialised dogs with them when they migrated from Siberia over the Bering Strait into North America.

Health - 28.11.2019
Death risk up to 12 times higher for mothers with prenatal opioid use
Approximately one in 20 mothers whose babies are born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) died within 10 years of delivery in both England and Canada, according to a new study from researchers at UCL and ICES and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Canada Neonatal abstinence syndrome (also called NAS) is a group of symptoms experienced by babies from withdrawal from certain drugs (predominantly opioids) that they are exposed to in the womb before birth.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.11.2019
Placenta changes could mean male offspring of older mums more likely to develop heart problems in later life, rat study finds
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Pharmacology - Health - 28.11.2019
Pharmacist-led interventions may help prevent cardiovascular disease
Pharmacists based in GP practices can play an integral role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, finds new research led by the University of Birmingham. The study findings, published today in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology , support the involvement of pharmacists as healthcare providers in managing patients with hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 27.11.2019
Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans
Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams. Led by Philip Staudigel, who conducted the analysis as a graduate student at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and is now a postdoctoral researcher at Cardiff University, the team has used new chemical analysis techniques to identify the exact cooking temperatures at which clams were cooked over 2500 years ago.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 27.11.2019
Animal embryos evolved before animals
Animal embryos evolved before animals
Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, before diversifying into 30 or 40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how animal ancestors made the transition from single-celled microbes to complex multicellular organisms has been the focus of intense debate.

Health - 27.11.2019
Suggests inducing labour at 41 weeks reduces risk, says maternity expert
A University of Birmingham maternity expert says research indicates that inducing women with low-risk pregnancies at 41 weeks rather than waiting until 42 weeks reduces risk to their baby's life. Current practice in the UK and Scandinavia is to induce delivery for women who have not gone into labour by 42 weeks.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.11.2019
Cutting nanoparticles down to size - new study
A new technique in chemistry could pave the way for producing uniform nanoparticles for use in drug delivery systems. Scientists have been investigating how to make better use of nanoparticles in medicine for several decades. Significantly smaller than an average cell, nanoparticles are more similar in size to proteins.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.11.2019
What protects killer immune cells from harming themselves?
White blood cells, which release a toxic potion of proteins to kill cancerous and virus-infected cells, are protected from any harm by the physical properties of their cell envelopes, find scientists from UCL and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. Until now, it has been a mystery to scientists how these white blood cells - called cytotoxic lymphocytes - avoid being killed by their own actions and the discovery could help explain why some tumours are more resistant than others to recently developed cancer immunotherapies.

Social Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Health - 27.11.2019
Physiotherapy ’postcode lottery’ uncovered
New findings showed that patients are more likely to receive physiotherapy after hip or knee replacement in London and the North of England. Patients in the South West are the least likely to receive physiotherapy. The research also found a range of other factors impacted whether patients received physiotherapy - including the age of the patient, their gender and ethnicity.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China's obesity problem
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare. Researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol worked with Guangzhou Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, enlisting 1,641 six-year-old children across 40 primary schools in Guangzhou to evaluate the effectiveness of the CHIRPY DRAGON programme in tackling childhood obesity.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2019
Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients due to increase in overdose death
Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients who are being treated with methadone or buprenorphine, also known as opioid agonist treatment (OAT), due to a three-fold increase in risk of overdose death, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Educating parents and grandparents - as well as improving physical activity and the food provided at school - could hold the key to solving China's obesity pandemic, according to one of the largest trials of childhood obesity prevention in the world. Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2019
One shot of ketamine could reduce problem drinking
A one-off dose of ketamine could help heavy drinkers reduce their alcohol intake, finds a new UCL experimental study. Giving a shot of ketamine to heavy drinkers after reactivating their drinking-related memories led to a rapid decrease in urges to drink and a prolonged decrease in alcohol intake over nine months, according to the study published .

Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Children of abused mothers 50 per cent more likely to have low IQ
In the study academics from the universities of Manchester, Bristol, Manchester Metropolitan and Kings College London found 13 per cent of children whose mothers did not experience domestic violence had an IQ of below 90 at eight years of age. If their mothers experienced physical violence from their partner either in pregnancy or during the first six years of the child's life, the figure rises to 22.8 per cent.

Social Sciences - 26.11.2019
Dating and relationship violence a significant issue among young people in Wales
Dating and relationship violence (DRV), including both physical and emotional violence, is a significant issue among young people in Wales, academics say. Cardiff University researchers analysed survey data from nearly 75,000 students aged 11-16, from 193 schools in Wales. Of young people with dating experience, 17% of boys and 12% of girls said that they had experienced physical violence by a romantic partner at least once.

Career - Academic Rankings - 26.11.2019
Early co-authorship with a senior academic boosts junior researchers’ future careers
Co-authoring a research paper with an established scientist early in an academic's career leads to significant future benefits for the junior researcher, finds a paper by UCL. This effect is much stronger for early-career researchers affiliated with less prestigious institutions, who are statistically less likely later in their careers to reach the same levels those at the most prestigious institutions will.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.11.2019
One third of UK doctors may suffer from workplace 'burnout'
One third of UK doctors may suffer from workplace ’burnout’
One in three UK doctors working in obstetrics and gynaecology may suffer from workplace burnout. This could affect their well-being and how they treat patients. This is the finding of new research, published in the journal BMJ Open , led by scientists at Imperial College London.

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