News 2019


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Results 61 - 80 of 652.


Health - Life Sciences - 02.09.2019
Colour-change urine test for cancer shows potential in mouse study
Colour-change urine test for cancer shows potential in mouse study
A simple and sensitive urine test developed by Imperial and MIT engineers has produced a colour change in urine to signal growing tumours in mice. Tools that detect cancer in its early stages can increase patient survival and quality of life. However, cancer screening approaches often call for expensive equipment and trips to the clinic, which may not be feasible in rural or developing areas with little medical infrastructure.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.09.2019
Body’s ageing process accelerated by DNA changes
Body's ageing process accelerated by DNA changes, study suggests DNA changes throughout a person's life can significantly increase their susceptibility to heart conditions and other age-related diseases, research suggests. Such alterations - known as somatic mutations - can impact the way blood stem cells work and are associated with blood cancers and other conditions.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.09.2019
Breast cancer can form 'sleeper cells' after drug treatment
Breast cancer can form ’sleeper cells’ after drug treatment
Breast cancer medicines may force some cancer cells into 'sleeper mode', allowing them to potentially come back to life years after initial treatment. These are the early-stage findings from scientists at Imperial College London , who studied human breast cancer cells in the laboratory.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.09.2019
Bacteria behind hospital infections block out antibiotics
Bacteria behind hospital infections block out antibiotics
Drug-resistant bacteria responsible for deadly hospital-acquired infections shut out antibiotics by closing tiny doors in their cell walls. The new finding by researchers at the MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection , Imperial College London, could allow researchers to design new drugs that ‘pick the locks' of these closed doors and allow antibiotics into bacterial cells.

Pharmacology - Health - 01.09.2019
Diabetes medication can be used to treat heart failure
A common diabetes medication, originally introduced as a treatment for diabetes, can be successfully used to treat patients with heart failure, reducing their risk of worsening heart failure or death from cardiovascular causes by more than 25%. The new research, which is presented today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2019, found the diabetes drug dapagliflozin could be used as a treatment for patients with heart failure, even if they don't also have diabetes.

Astronomy / Space Science - 30.08.2019
Busy older stars outpace stellar youngsters
The oldest stars in our Galaxy are also the busiest, moving more rapidly than their younger counterparts in and out of the disk of the Milky Way, according to new analysis carried out at the University of Birmingham. The findings provide fresh insights into the history of our Galaxy and increase our understanding of how stars form and evolve.

Microtechnics - 30.08.2019
Key step in robotic disassembly
Engineers at the University of Birmingham have successfully designed a robotic system that can perform a key task in disassembling component parts. The research is an important advance for manufacturers looking for more efficient ways to build products from a combination of reused, repaired and new parts.

Life Sciences - 30.08.2019
Refugee mental health and malarial mysteries: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From a study of refugee mothers' mental health, to a new method for cracking a malarial mystery, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Refugee mental health A small study of women in the Middle East has found very high rates depressive symptoms among mothers living in refugee camps.

Sport - 30.08.2019
It’s never too late to start exercising
Older people who have never taken part in sustained exercise programmes have the same ability to build muscle mass as highly trained master athletes of a similar age, according to new research at the University of Birmingham. The research shows that even those who are entirely unaccustomed to exercise can benefit from resistance exercises such as weight training.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 29.08.2019
Drug discovery offers new hope to halt the spread of malaria
Drug discovery offers new hope to halt the spread of malaria Breakthrough research has revealed a new drug that may prevent the spread of malaria, and also treat people suffering with the deadly parasitic disease. The findings, which were delivered by an international team of scientists led by the University of Glasgow and published today in Science, offer fresh hope in the global fight against malaria.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 29.08.2019
Gravitational waves observed from another cosmic collision of a pair of black holes
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration identify a further gravitational wave event in the data from the Advanced LIGO detectors. On 26 December 2015 at 03:38:53 GMT, the twin LIGO instruments observed a binary black hole coalescence, named GW151226.

Palaeontology - 29.08.2019
First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analysing the fossilised teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. The results, published in the journal Science Advances , provide a first insight into the practice of weaning that remain otherwise unseen in the fossil record.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.08.2019
Artificial red blood cells enable research into malaria invasion
Artificial red blood cells enable research into malaria invasion
Researchers at the University of Bristol and Imperial College London have established a new model system that uses red blood cells grown in the laboratory to study how malaria parasites invade red blood cells. The work, which was funded by the National Institute for Health Research and NHS Blood and Transplant and is published , provides a powerful new research tool for the identification of key host proteins and their domains that are involved in parasite infection.

Health - Materials Science - 27.08.2019
New antimicrobial coating could be key in fight against hospital-acquired infections
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have created an antimicrobial coating for steel surfaces which has proven to rapidly kill bacteria that cause some of the most common hospital-acquired infections. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, patented by University of Birmingham Enterprise , and to be commercialised by a new company NitroPep, the coating - also called NitroPep - has been heralded as a new tool in the fight against the spread of infection.

Earth Sciences - 27.08.2019
'Surrey swarm' earthquakes not caused by nearby oil extraction, says study
’Surrey swarm’ earthquakes not caused by nearby oil extraction, says study
Imperial College London research has found no evidence that oil extraction caused recent earthquakes known as the 'Surrey swarm' in Surrey and Sussex. The series of 34 small earthquakes between April 2018 and May 2019 occurred within 10 km of two active oil extraction sites at Brockham and Horse Hill in Surrey.

Pharmacology - Health - 25.08.2019
Removing cancer’s protective barrier could boost immunotherapy treatments
Scientists at the University of Birmingham may have found a way to pull down the protective wall that surrounds tumours, potentially re-exposing them to the killing power of the immune system and immunotherapy treatments, according to a study part funded by Cancer Research UK and published in EBioMedicine today.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.08.2019
Shows low-cost once a day combination pill can prevent heart disease and stroke
Research carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham in the UK has shown a combination low-cost pill called a polypill containing four drugs is effective in preventing cardiovascular disease. The results of the clinical trial, published in The Lancet , demonstrate for the first time the effectiveness of a fixed-dose combination pill for preventing cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke) and indicate that the benefits of widespread polypill use outweigh any known side effects.

Administration - 22.08.2019
Finds victims of rape or sexual assault feel marginalised
The Scottish criminal justice process leaves those who have reported a rape or serious sexual assault feeling marginalised and with little control regardless of their case's outcome, a new study has found. Researchers from the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research at the University of Glasgow interviewed victim-survivors who have navigated their way through the system to try and understand their 'justice journey'.

History / Archeology - 21.08.2019
New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle
New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle
Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject of continued debate and archaeological manipulation. The mysterious skeleton and associated grave goods, including a sword and two knives, were identified as Viking by the Nazis, as a Slavonic warrior by the Soviets and became part of the Czech independence movement in more recent years.

Life Sciences - 21.08.2019
Separate polarisation and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Separate polarisation and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Fiddler crabs see the polarisation of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. Now researchers at the University of Bristol have begun to unravel how this information is processed within the crab's brain. The study, published in Science Advances today [Wednesday 21 August], has discovered that when detecting approaching objects, fiddler crabs separate polarisation and brightness information.

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