News 2019


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Results 41 - 60 of 652.


Life Sciences - 09.09.2019
Q&A: Tackling zinc deficiency with a new approach to urine testing
Q&A: Tackling zinc deficiency with a new approach to urine testing
Imperial College London researchers have developed a new urine test that looks to 'chemical fingerprints' for more precise zinc testing. This new approach, outlined in a new paper published in Metallomics , could provide more specific tests to warn of zinc deficiency - particularly in developing countries.

Veterinary Science - Health - 09.09.2019
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Researchers at the universities of Abuja and Nigeria, in collaboration with the University of Bristol, have detected a potentially human-infective microbe in pet dogs in Nigeria. Dogs in tropical Africa run the risk of contracting canine trypanosomosis if they are bitten by bloodsucking tsetse flies carrying trypanosomes - microscopic, single-celled organisms found in the bloodstream.

Psychology - 09.09.2019
High levels of sexism could be fuelling poor mental health among women
High levels of sexism could be fuelling poor mental health among women
One in five women report sex discrimination and these women are more likely to develop poorer mental health after the sexist experience, according to a new UCL study investigating links between sexism and mental health and wellbeing. The study, published today in Health Psychology, analysed data from nearly 3,000 women from T he UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS) over a period of four years.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.09.2019
Predatory bacteria attack initiation mechanism revealed in new study
Scientists have unravelled the attack initiation mechanism used by so-called ‘predatory bacteria', which are capable of invading and killing harmful bugs including E. coli or Salmonella . These bacteria attack other bacteria by attaching to the cell exterior, then burrowing through and devouring the cell from the inside.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 06.09.2019
Blast impact and cancer cuts: News from the College
Blast impact and cancer cuts: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From fresh insights into the impact of blast injuries on children, to a technological way to cut womb cancer wait times, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Impact of child blast injuries revealed A new BMJ paper has outlined the effects of blast injuries on children compared to adults.

Chemistry - 06.09.2019
Making sustainable polymers from fragrant molecules
A way of making organic polymers from the fragrant molecules in conifers and fruit trees has been developed by scientists at the University of Birmingham. The technique, developed for 3D printing applications, could lead to a new generation of sustainable materials for use in biomedical applications or prototyping.

Music - 06.09.2019
As light as a lemon: How the right smell can help with a negative body image
The scent of a lemon could help people feel better about their body image, new findings from University of Sussex research has revealed. In a new study from the university's Sussex Computer-Human Interaction (SCHI) Lab, people feel thinner and lighter when they experienced the scent of a lemon. The research, carried out in collaboration with researchers at the University College of London Interaction Centre (UCLIC) and the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), also revealed people contrastingly felt thicker and heavier when they smelt vanilla.

Environment - Business / Economics - 05.09.2019
Five cool things about our environmental research
From decarbonising heat to food security and water sustainability, we're working to bring about improvements that will benefit nature and the well-being of the planet. Durham's research is having an impact on the environment and potentially all of our lives. In fact, it's hard to imagine a more important research focus for us than the environment given that all life depends upon it.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 05.09.2019
’Martian CSI’ reveals how asteroid impacts created running water under red planet
Dr Luke Daly, Research Associate in Solar System Science at the University of Glasgow's School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, holding a piece of a Martian nakhlite meteorite. Modern analysis of Martian meteorites has revealed unprecedented details about how asteroid impacts help create temporary sources of running water on the red planet.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 05.09.2019
Generational study looks for biological links between adverse childhood experiences and self-harm
New research from the University of Bristol is the first to use a large generational family study to examine links between childhood trauma, the impact of inflammation and self-harm. Epidemiologists examined 4300 young people in Bristol's Children of the 90s study to see if adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) such as experiencing abuse, witnessing domestic violence or having separated parents are linked to self-harm at the age of 16.

Life Sciences - 04.09.2019
Genetic factors influencing adult obesity take effect in early childhood
Genetic factors influencing adult obesity take effect in early childhood
Body mass index (BMI) in infants, children and adults is influenced by different genetic factors that change as we age, according to a major new study An international consortium of researchers, led by scientists at Imperial College London, the University of Surrey, and the University of Oulu, Finland, discovered that BMI in babies is influenced by a distinct set of genetic variants that play little role in determining weight in later life.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.09.2019
Protein tangles linked with dementia seen after single head injury
Protein tangles linked with dementia seen after single head injury
Scientists have visualised for the first time protein 'tangles' associated with dementia in patients who have suffered a single head injury. This is the finding of a new study led by scientists from Imperial College London , published Translational Medicine.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.09.2019
Protein tangles linked with dementia seen for first time in patients’ brains
Scientists have visualised for the first time protein 'tangles' associated with dementia in the brains of patients who have suffered a single head injury. This is the finding of a new study led by scientists from Imperial College London, published Translational Medicine. In the early-stage study, researchers studied 21 patients who had suffered a moderate to severe head injury at least 18 years earlier (mostly from traffic accidents), as well as 11 healthy individuals who had not experienced a head injury.

Environment - 04.09.2019
Putting a price on carbon pollution alone unlikely to help reach climate goals
Researchers show that carbon taxes alone cannot reduce emissions enough to reach the Paris Agreement targets. The Paris Agreement, signed in 2015, requires nations to collectively limit global warming to 2°C by 2100, and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5°C.

Health - 04.09.2019
Fewer women do bowel screening test
Women are risking their lives by not taking part in bowel screening tests according to new research. A research team led by Professor Colin McCowan at the University of St Andrews and Dr Katie Robb from the University of Glasgow found that while 81% of women took part in cervical cancer screening and 73% in breast cancer screening only 60% of women took part in bowel screening.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.09.2019
Cracking "virus code" could help fight cancer
Virus experts from Cardiff University's School of Medicine have uncovered, for the first time, how a virus known as Adenovirus type 26 (Ad26), which has been used effectively in a tamed form as a vaccine, can infect human cells. Ad26 is a virus of great interest to the scientific and medical community.

Astronomy / Space Science - Administration - 04.09.2019
Researchers to investigate solitude and the physics of the Universe
Research investigating the effects of being alone on well-being is one of two Cardiff University projects to benefit from 3.38m funding from the European Research Council (ERC). Dr Netta Weinstein, from the School of Psychology, will receive 1.48m to investigate how people respond to solitude, at a time when more people are living alone.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.09.2019
Cholesterol-cutting gene silencing treatment shows lasting effects
Twice-yearly injections of a cholesterol-cutting medication could offer patients lasting reduction in cholesterol, cutting risk of heart attacks. A new, currently-unlicensed drug treatment that works by ‘silencing' genes can help to halve levels of LDL cholesterol with just two injections per year, according to new data presented this week.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.09.2019
’Asexual’ Chagas parasite found to sexually reproduce
A parasite, largely thought to be asexual, has been shown to reproduce sexually after scientists uncover clues hidden in its genomic code. Trypanosoma cruzi is the parasite responsible for Chagas Disease, found in Latin America. Around eight million people are currently infected by the disease, which can cause irreversible damage to the heart and digestive tract.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 02.09.2019
Vintage film of Antarctic glaciers hints at early ice shelf collapse
Vintage film of Antarctic glaciers hints at early ice shelf collapse
Digitised archival film has revealed part of Thwaites Glacier is melting faster than thought, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected. Newly digitised vintage film has doubled how far back scientists can peer into the history of ice in Antarctica, and revealed that an ice shelf on Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is being thawed by a warming ocean more quickly than previously thought.

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