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Results 21 - 40 of 884.


Life Sciences - Health - 03.12.2019
World first as artificial neurons developed to cure chronic diseases
Artificial neurons on silicon chips that behave just like the real thing have been invented by scientists - a first-of-its-kind achievement with enormous scope for medical devices to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure, Alzheimer's, and other diseases of neuronal degeneration. Critically the artificial neurons not only behave just like biological neurons but only need one billionth the power of a microprocessor, making them ideally suited for use in medical implants and other bio-electronic devices.

Administration - 03.12.2019
Opinion poll lessons reveal deficit in Government safety spending
Opinion poll lessons reveal deficit in Government safety spending
The government currently uses a measure known as the value of a prevented fatality or VPF to determine spending on safety across several major departments, including the Department for Transport. In contrast with political opinion polls, which generally survey a minimum of 1,000 people to achieve the standard three per cent margin of error, the VPF is based on a survey of only 167 people, carried out 20 years ago.

Administration - 03.12.2019
Cultural differences account for global gap in online regulation - study
Differences in cultural values have led some countries to tackle the spectre of cyber-attacks with increased internet regulation, whilst others have taken a ‘hands-off' approach to online security - a new study shows. Internet users gravitate towards one of two ‘poles' of social values. Risk-taking users are found in ‘competitive' national cultures prompting heavy regulation, whilst web users in ‘co-operative' nations exhibit less risky behaviour requiring lighter regulation.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 03.12.2019
Analysis: We may have solved the mystery of how landslides form on Mars
Mars's huge landslides can move at speeds of up to 360 kilometres an hour for up to tens of kilometres. PhD candidate Giulia Magnarini and Dr Tom Mitchell (UCL Earth Sciences) write about how these landslides may have formed. Some landslides on Mars seem to defy an important law of physics. "Long, runout landslides" are formed by huge volumes of rock and soil moving downslope, largely due to the force of gravity.

Pharmacology - Health - 02.12.2019
Face mask can help combat mild cases of sleep condition
Face mask can help combat mild cases of sleep condition
A night time face mask can improve energy levels and vitality in people who suffer from the condition sleep apnoea. This is the finding from a new study of over 200 patients, published in the journal The Lancet Respiratory Medicine , led by Imperial College London. We are seeing increasing cases of sleep apnoea, and in a wide range of patients.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.12.2019
Reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins | University of Oxford
Reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins | University of Oxford
Antarctic penguins have been on the forefront of climate change, experiencing massive changes to their natural habitat as the world's temperatures and human activity in the region have increased. Now, new research has revealed how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 02.12.2019
1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria
DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the colonial period, finds a new study co-led by UCL. The research published in Molecular Biology and Evolution reports the genome sequence of a malaria parasite sourced from blood-stained medical microscope slides used in 1944 in Spain, one of the last footholds of malaria in Europe.

Chemistry - Environment - 02.12.2019
New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage
New membrane technology to boost water purification and energy storage
Imperial College London scientists have created a new type of membrane that could improve water purification and battery energy storage efforts. The new approach to ion exchange membrane design, which is published today , uses low-cost plastic membranes with many tiny hydrophilic (‘water-attracting') pores.

Computer Science / Telecom - Health - 29.11.2019
Opinion: How the technology behind deepfakes can benefit all of society
Professor Geraint Rees, Pro-Vice-Provost of Artificial Intelligence at UCL, writes that AI can and must be used for good, to complement and augment human endeavour rather than replace it. Recent advances in deepfake video technology have led to a rapid increase of such videos in the public domain in the past year.

Environment - Music - 29.11.2019
Sounds of the past give new hope for coral reef restoration
Sounds of the past give new hope for coral reef restoration
An international team of scientists from the UK's Universities of Exeter and Bristol, and Australia's James Cook University and Australian Institute of Marine Science, say this "acoustic enrichment" could be a valuable tool in helping to restore damaged coral reefs. Working on Australia's recently devastated Great Barrier Reef, the scientists placed underwater loudspeakers playing healthy reef recordings in patches of dead coral and found twice as many fish arrived - and stayed - compared to equivalent patches where no sound was played.

Innovation - Social Sciences - 28.11.2019
Birmingham ’innovation hub’ boosts global clean energy prospects
British and German experts from industry and academia will create a new ‘Innovation Hub' based in Birmingham to deliver new approaches to energy and waste management that will benefit cities and communities in China and around the world. Energy experts from the University of Birmingham and Fraunhofer UMSICHT have renewed their Joint Research Platform set up in 2016 with plans to locate collaborative research in a new centre at the city's Tyseley Energy Park.

Veterinary Science - Environment - 28.11.2019
Unique sledge dogs helped the Inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
A unique group of dogs helped the Inuit conquer the tough terrain of the North American Arctic, a major new analysis of the remains of hundreds of animals shows. The results of a major new study on the remains of Artic sledge dogs reveals that the Inuit brought specialised dogs with them when they migrated from Siberia over the Bering Strait into North America.

Health - 28.11.2019
Death risk up to 12 times higher for mothers with prenatal opioid use
Approximately one in 20 mothers whose babies are born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) died within 10 years of delivery in both England and Canada, according to a new study from researchers at UCL and ICES and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Canada Neonatal abstinence syndrome (also called NAS) is a group of symptoms experienced by babies from withdrawal from certain drugs (predominantly opioids) that they are exposed to in the womb before birth.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.11.2019
Placenta changes could mean male offspring of older mums more likely to develop heart problems in later life, rat study finds
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Pharmacology - Health - 28.11.2019
Pharmacist-led interventions may help prevent cardiovascular disease
Pharmacists based in GP practices can play an integral role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, finds new research led by the University of Birmingham. The study findings, published today in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology , support the involvement of pharmacists as healthcare providers in managing patients with hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 27.11.2019
Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans
Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams. Led by Philip Staudigel, who conducted the analysis as a graduate student at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and is now a postdoctoral researcher at Cardiff University, the team has used new chemical analysis techniques to identify the exact cooking temperatures at which clams were cooked over 2500 years ago.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 27.11.2019
Animal embryos evolved before animals
Animal embryos evolved before animals
Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, before diversifying into 30 or 40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how animal ancestors made the transition from single-celled microbes to complex multicellular organisms has been the focus of intense debate.

Health - 27.11.2019
Suggests inducing labour at 41 weeks reduces risk, says maternity expert
A University of Birmingham maternity expert says research indicates that inducing women with low-risk pregnancies at 41 weeks rather than waiting until 42 weeks reduces risk to their baby's life. Current practice in the UK and Scandinavia is to induce delivery for women who have not gone into labour by 42 weeks.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.11.2019
Cutting nanoparticles down to size - new study
A new technique in chemistry could pave the way for producing uniform nanoparticles for use in drug delivery systems. Scientists have been investigating how to make better use of nanoparticles in medicine for several decades. Significantly smaller than an average cell, nanoparticles are more similar in size to proteins.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.11.2019
What protects killer immune cells from harming themselves?
White blood cells, which release a toxic potion of proteins to kill cancerous and virus-infected cells, are protected from any harm by the physical properties of their cell envelopes, find scientists from UCL and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. Until now, it has been a mystery to scientists how these white blood cells - called cytotoxic lymphocytes - avoid being killed by their own actions and the discovery could help explain why some tumours are more resistant than others to recently developed cancer immunotherapies.

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