News 2019


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Results 21 - 40 of 941.


Health - 18.12.2019
Girls with anxiety could be at greater risk of eating disorders
Teenage girls who experience clinical levels of anxiety could be at greater risk of eating disorders, according to researchers at UCL and University of Bristol. The study, published today in European Eating Disorders Review , looked at anxiety disorder pathology and engagement with severe levels of fasting (not eating for an entire day) in 2,406 teenage girls of Bristol's Children of the 90s study.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.12.2019
Could AI help develop personalised psychosis therapies?
A new multicentre study will investigate the link between brain inflammation and psychosis, and use artificial intelligence techniques to identify patients that might benefit most from novel treatments. The study, funded by UKRI Medical Research Council , is led by the Universities of Birmingham and Cambridge.

Social Sciences - 18.12.2019
Meerkat mobs do ’war dance’ to protect territory
Meerkat clans perform a 'war dance' to frighten opponents and protect their territory, according to a new UCL and University of Cambridge study. The study, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , is the first empirical study to reveal intergroup aggression. The researchers, who monitored hundreds of these intergroup encounters over 11 years, show that meetings between meerkat clans often turn aggressive and sometimes escalate to fighting and lethal violence.

Social Sciences - 18.12.2019
As Sussex research programme ends, findings continue to influence policy on migration and poverty
After nearly a decade, the Migrating out of Poverty Research Programme (MOOP) is drawing to a close, having conducted research in more than ten countries in an effort to uncover how and why migration plays such a significant role in poverty reduction in some contexts, but not in others. Funded by the UK's Department for International Development, MOOP has built up a robust body of evidence on the relationship between migration and poverty, with research feeding directly into regional policy in the global South, and cited in international reports on development.

Health - 18.12.2019
Focus on teenage anxiety may help early identification of those at risk of eating disorders
Focus on teenage anxiety may help early identification of those at risk of eating disorders
Teenage girls who experience clinical levels of anxiety could be at greater risk of eating disorders, according to associations identified in a study completed by researchers at the University of Bristol with UCL. Published today [18 December] in European Eating Disorders Review , the new research looked at anxiety disorder pathology and engagement with severe levels of fasting (not eating for an entire day) in 2,406 teenage girls of Bristol's Children of the 90s study.

Health - 17.12.2019
Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of maternal deaths in the UK
The leading cause of maternal deaths in the UK is still cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks, heart failure and heart rhythm problems, and there has been no reduction in maternal cardiovascular mortality rates for more than 15 years. These are the main findings of a new report, Saving Lives, Improving Mothers' Care , from the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU), part of the Nuffield Department of Population Health (NDPH) at the University of Oxford.

Politics - Business / Economics - 17.12.2019
Female MPs more vocal under female leadership
Female MPs are roughly 20% more vocal in parliamentary debates where the cabinet minister is female than when the responsible minister is male, finds a new study by UCL. The research, published in the British Journal of Political Science , is the first to consider whether female leadership affects the processes or outcomes of political debate.

Social Sciences - 17.12.2019
Palliative care services lag behind rapid growth in global need
Just 14% of people in the world population have access to palliative care services that allow people to die with dignity and alleviate their suffering, according to new research led by the University of Glasgow. And more than half of the world's population - mainly in low and middle-income countries - have very poor or non-existent access to palliative care.

Health - Administration - 16.12.2019
Cold infections may be less frequent in people with the flu
Cold infections may be less frequent in people with the flu
People were less likely to catch either influenza or a common cold-causing rhinovirus if they were already infected with the other virus, a new study by scientists from the Medical Research Council-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research has found. Understanding how these distinct viruses inhibit each other could help public health planning to improve forecasting models that predict respiratory disease outbreaks and strategies for controlling disease spread, say the scientists.

Life Sciences - 16.12.2019
Strength of conviction won’t help to persuade when people disagree
If you disagree with someone, it might not make any difference how certain they say they are, as during disagreement your brain's sensitivity to the strength of people's beliefs is reduced, finds a study led by UCL and City, University of London. The brain scanning study, published , reveals a new type of confirmation bias that can make it very difficult to alter people's opinions.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.12.2019
Major research project aims to improve treatment for women with polycystic ovary syndrome
A major £2.4 million research project is underway at the University of Birmingham aimed at improving treatment for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS affects at least ten percent of all women and causes irregular periods and difficulties trying to conceive. Most women with PCOS have high levels of male hormones, known as androgens, in their blood which can also cause unwanted body hair growth and acne.

Mechanical Engineering - 16.12.2019
Bristol discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible
Bristol discovery reveals tractionless motion is possible
In an article published in Physical Review Letters, Bristol scientists have answered the fundamental question: "Is it possible to move without exerting force on the environment?", by describing the tractionless self-propulsion of active matter. Understanding how cells move autonomously is a fundamental question for both biologists and physicists.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 16.12.2019
Poorest countries facing ’double burden’ of obesity and malnutrition
More than one in three lowand middle-income countries are facing high levels of obesity and under-nourishment, according to a report involving UCL researchers. The report, published today in The Lancet,  says a new approach is needed to help reduce the 'double burden' of undernutrition and obesity at the same time, as the issues become increasingly connected due to rapid changes in countries' food systems.

Business / Economics - 13.12.2019
The science of couples cheating with their money
One in three people commit "financial infidelity", with potentially toxic consequences for their relationships, according to a study co-led by UCL which is thought to be the first to investigate the concept. Romantic relationships are built on trust, but partners are not always honest about their financial behaviour - they often hide spending, debt, and savings from one another.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.12.2019
Labelling foods with amount of physical activity needed to burn off calories linked to healthier choices
Labelling food and drink with the amount and type of exercise needed to burn off its calorie content may be a more effective way of encouraging people to make ‘healthier' dietary choices, shows research carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham.

Life Sciences - 12.12.2019
Parakeet ’crime map’ busts Bogart and Hendrix myths
Using geographic profiling to map half a century of ring-necked parakeet sightings, a research team involving UCL has found no evidence to support any of the colourful legends surrounding the birds' origins in the UK. Stories have circulated in recent years that seek to explain how the non-native bright green birds ( Psittacula krameri ) started breeding and spread to become one of Britain's most successful alien species.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.12.2019
Up to two fifths of antibiotic prescriptions in the US could be inappropriate
As much as two fifths (43 per cent) of antibiotic prescriptions in the United States could be inappropriate, warn researchers highlighted in an editorial by Professor Hay from Bristol Medical School published by The BMJ today [11 December]. Such a high degree of potentially unnecessary prescribing has important implications for antibiotic stewardship - efforts to reduce antibiotic use in response to the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2019
Chimpanzees may have evolved resistance to HIV precursor
Simian immunodeficiency virus, the monkeyand ape-infecting virus that HIV originated from, may have influenced the genetics of chimpanzees, finds a new UCL-led study. The virus is a leading contributor to differences between chimpanzee subspecies, according to the findings published in  PLOS Genetics .

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 11.12.2019
Water common - yet scarce - in exoplanets
Water common - yet scarce - in exoplanets
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Computer Science / Telecom - 11.12.2019
Undervolting allows attacks on Intel’s secure enclaves
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have identified a weakness in Intel's processors: by undervolting the CPU, Intel's secure enclave technology becomes vulnerable to attack. Modern processors are being pushed to perform faster than ever before - and with this comes increases in heat and power consumption.

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