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Results 21 - 40 of 489.


Environment - 12.08.2019
Plants could remove six years of carbon dioxide emissions - if we protect them
Plants could remove six years of carbon dioxide emissions - if we protect them
By analysing 138 experiments, researchers have mapped the potential of today's plants and trees to store extra carbon by the end of the century. The results show trees and plants could remove six years of current emissions by 2100, but only if no further deforestation occurs. The study, led by Stanford University and the Autonomous University of Barcelona, and including Imperial College London researchers, is published today .

Social Sciences - 09.08.2019
Bone strength could be linked to when you reached puberty
Bone strength could be linked to when you reached puberty
A new study from the University of Bristol has linked bone strength to the timing of puberty. Published today (Friday 9 August) in JAMA Network Open researchers looked at six repeated bone scans from 6389 children in Bristol's Children of the 90s study between the ages of ten and 25 to assess if the timing of puberty had any influence on bone density throughout adolescence and into early adulthood.

Social Sciences - 09.08.2019
Children at risk of sexual exploitation need better support, report concludes
Children who are constantly moved around the social care system are more likely to be vulnerable to sexual exploitation, new research concludes. Dr Sophie Hallett of Cardiff University led the study, which used case records to track a cohort of 205 children involved with social services in one Welsh local authority.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 08.08.2019
Scientists uncover deep-rooted plumbing system beneath ocean volcanoes
Cardiff University scientists have revealed the true extent of the internal ‘plumbing system' that drives volcanic activity around the world. An examination of pockets of magma contained within crystals has revealed that the large chambers of molten rock which feed volcanoes can extend to over 16 km beneath the Earth's surface.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.08.2019
Inflammatory disease and animal research expert shares insights in Reddit AMA
Inflammatory disease and animal research expert shares insights in Reddit AMA
In a live Reddit 'Ask Me Anything', Dr Laurence Bugeon shared insights into how inflammation is mediated by bad lifestyle habits. In the latest of a series of animal research Ask Me Anything (AMA) sessions Dr Bugeon and PhD student Madina Wane held the Reddit Q&A on Wednesday 31 July interview on the social media channel's IAmA subreddit to talk about how zebrafish as animal models are revolutionising their field.

Environment - 08.08.2019
Suggests groundwater in Africa could be resilient to climate change
Suggests groundwater in Africa could be resilient to climate change
New research suggests groundwater in Africa could be resilient to climate change Groundwater - a vital source of water for drinking and irrigation across sub-Saharan Africa - may be relatively resilient to climate variability and change, according to a new study involving the University of Sussex. Groundwater, water present beneath the Earth's surface, plays a central role in sustaining water supplies and livelihoods in sub-Saharan Africa due to its widespread availability, generally high quality, and intrinsic ability to buffer episodes of drought and increasing climate variability.

Business / Economics - 07.08.2019
Are wearable pet devices putting our security at risk?
Are wearable pet devices putting our security at risk?
The billion-dollar pet industry now has a growing market dedicated to wearable devices but new research from the University of Bristol has found these devices capture more data on the owners rather than their pets. Consumers have the option to track location, activity and health data of their pets but the Bristol Cyber Security Group have found these wearables do not always acknowledge the privacy implications for the humans and their data.

Social Sciences - 07.08.2019
Self-harm incidents in Welsh prisons reach new high
The number of self-harm incidents in Welsh prisons has reached record levels, figures from Cardiff University's Wales Governance Centre show. Drawing on data from Freedom of Information requests as well as publicly available Ministry of Justice figures, the report shows that self-harm incidents (excluding HMP Berwyn*) rose by 16% in the year ending March 2019, following a record figure the previous year.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 07.08.2019
Thriving animal collectives like ants should move through their environment like ‘savvy gamblers’
Many animals have to move around in their environment to find resources to live and reproduce. Scientists have studied particular examples of this for many years but there are not many unifying frameworks to understand the general organising principles of animal movement. This is especially true for animal collectives like ant colonies, whose individual routes as they search for food can look rather like a ‘random walk'.

Environment - 06.08.2019
Killings of environmental defenders strongly linked to corruption and weak rule of law, according to new study
Killings of environmental defenders strongly linked to corruption and weak rule of law, according to new study
Killings of environmental defenders doubled between 2002 and 2017, with the number of recorded deaths now similar to those of war zones, according to a new paper co-authored by a University of Sussex Research Fellow. Using data from watchdog NGO Global Witness , the new paper has revealed that, between 2002 to 2017, recorded deaths of environmental defenders increased from two to four a week.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.08.2019
Global team of scientists finish assembling next-generation dark matter detector
Global team of scientists finish assembling next-generation dark matter detector
The key component of the LUX-ZEPLIN experiment is ready to be sealed and lowered nearly 1.5 km underground, where it will search for dark matter. Dark matter is a mysterious form of matter thought to make up around 85% of the mass of the universe. However, because it is predicted to interact only very weakly with ordinary matter, it has so far not been detected.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.08.2019
New hormone injection aids weight loss in obese patients
An injection has helped reduce body weight and glucose levels in patients with diabetes and obesity in four weeks. The findings came from a small study in which patients lost on average 4.4kg and the treatment led to substantial improvements to their blood glucose, with some patients' reducing to near-normal levels.

Computer Science / Telecom - 06.08.2019
New technology to monitor anti-Polish hate online
Artificial intelligence is being used to tackle anti-Polish hate crime in the run up to Brexit. Researchers at HateLab, based at Cardiff University, are working with Samurai Labs, a Polish Artificial Intelligence laboratory, to monitor aggressive social media content and pinpoint any connections to offline events.

Chemistry - Physics - 06.08.2019
Artificial tongue could have whisky counterfeiting licked
An artificial 'tongue' which can taste subtle differences between drams of whisky could help cut down on the trade in counterfeit alcohol, scientists say. In a new paper published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry's journal Nanoscale, Scottish engineers describe how they built the tiny taster, which exploits the optical properties of gold and aluminium to test the tipples.

Music - 06.08.2019
Researchers create first-ever personalised sound projector with 10 webcam
Researchers create first-ever personalised sound projector with 10 webcam
Researchers create first-ever personalised sound projector with £10 webcam A University of Sussex research team have demonstrated the first sound projector that can track a moving individual and deliver an acoustic message as they move, to a high-profile tech and media conference in LA. Dr Gianluca Memoli and his colleagues demonstrated what they believe to be the world's first sound projector with an autozoom objective in a talk at the 46th International Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics & Interactive Techniques (SIGGRAPH 2019) this week.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.08.2019
Gut changes in polar bears linked to retreat of Arctic sea ice
Gut changes in polar bears linked to retreat of Arctic sea ice
Retreating sea ice in the Arctic is altering the gut bacteria of polar bears, potentially holding negative implications for the long-term health of the species, finds a new study by Cardiff University and the United States Geological Survey. Polar bears are one of the most ice-dependent marine mammals in the Arctic and are key indicators of Arctic ecosystem health and environmental change.

Materials Science - Environment - 05.08.2019
Five cool things our surface scientists do
Surface science can make a big difference to our health, well-being and environment. Our surface scientists at Durham have been working on a whole range of applications that have already changed our lives in some way (think mobile phones and puddles) and could make a real difference to people around the world, particularly in developing countries.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.08.2019
Larger blood transfusions could halve deaths of children with severe anaemia
Giving larger volumes of blood transfusions to children with severe anaemia in sub-Saharan Africa could halve the number of deaths. This is the finding of new research from a clinical trial co-led by Imperial College London and UCL. Results from the TRACT trial , published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) , show that children with complicated severe anaemia who do not have a fever require larger volumes of blood transfusions than current World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines.

Life Sciences - 02.08.2019
Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists
Genes that first enabled plants to grow leaves identified by scientists
The genes that first enabled plants to grow shoots and conquer the land have been identified by University of Bristol researchers. The findings, published in Current Biology [1 August], explain how a 450-million years ago a switch enabled plants to delay reproduction and grow shoots, leaves and buds.

Psychology - 02.08.2019
Could explain why babies born during winter are at higher risk of developing mental health disorders
Levels of the stress hormone cortisol are higher in women who give birth in the autumn and winter than those who give birth in the spring or summer, finds a new study by researchers at Cardiff University. The new findings could explain why mental health disorders are more common in people born during the winter.

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