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Life Sciences - 12.11.2019
Scientists uncover the sketchpad of the mind’s eye
Neuroscientists at the University of Glasgow have gained new insight into how the brain predicts missing visual information when perceiving the outside world. The researchers, from the University's Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, discovered that our brains "sketch out" portions of scenes that are not visible - much like how an artist sketches out a scene before filling the remaining details.

Health - 12.11.2019
Some complementary and alternative therapies to treat colic show promise
A review of the evidence on the use of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies to treat babies with colic has shown some that some treatments - including probiotics, fennel extract and spinal manipulation - do appear to help, but that overall the evidence on the use of these therapies is limited so should be treated with caution.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.11.2019
Old Joe to turn blue to mark World Antibiotic Awareness Week
The face of the University of Birmingham's 'Old Joe' Clock tower will be lit blue to shine a light on the work scientists are doing to discover new ways to prevent and treat drug-resistant bacterial infections. The clock will turn blue during World Antibiotic Awareness Week 2019, which runs from 18 - 24 November, and is organised by the World Health Organization (WHO) to increase global awareness of antibiotic resistance and to encourage best practices among the general public, health workers and policy makers to avoid the further emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.11.2019
Newborn baby hiccups could be key to brain development
Each time a newborn baby hiccups, it triggers a large wave of brain signals which could help the baby learn how to regulate their breathing, finds a new UCL-led study. The study, published in Clinical Neurophysiology , was based on brain scans of newborn infants. "The reasons for why we hiccup are not entirely clear, but there may be a developmental reason, given that foetuses and newborn babies hiccup so frequently," said the study's lead author, research associate Kimberley Whitehead (UCL Neuroscience, Physiology & Pharmacology).

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.11.2019
Bacteria may contribute more to climate change as planet heats up
As bacteria adapt to hotter temperatures, they speed up their respiration rate and release more carbon, potentially accelerating climate change. By releasing more carbon as global temperatures rise, bacteria and related organisms called archaea could increase climate warming at a faster rate than current models suggest.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.11.2019
Pioneering new ‘smart needle’ could revolutionise cancer diagnosis
Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that can detect and diagnose one of the most common types of cancer within seconds - using light. A multidisciplinary team of experts has developed a ground-breaking 'smart needle' probe that uses light to pinpoint cancerous tissues or cells almost instantaneously.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.11.2019
Arts ’crucial’ to reducing poor health and inequality
Engaging in artistic activities such as singing and dancing from a young age can reduce social inequalities and encourage healthy behaviours, according to a new report from UCL and the World Health Organisation (WHO). The study, published today, is the world's largest review to date into the health benefits of the arts.

Social Sciences - 09.11.2019
Looked for links between teenage anxiety and later harmful drinking
The study, published today (Monday 11 November) in Drug and Alcohol Dependence at the start of Alcohol Awareness Week (11 - 17 November) strengthens the evidence for a relationship between anxiety and later alcohol use as the researchers accounted for other factors such as adolescent smoking and cannabis use, and parental anxiety and alcohol use.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.11.2019
UCL hosts minister as part of Tomorrow’s Engineers Week
Universities Minister Chris Skidmore MP visited the UCL Institute of Healthcare Engineering (IHE) Autumn Research Symposium today as part of Tomorrow's Engineers Week. Mr Skidmore met Professor Becky Shipley, Director of the IHE, who with her team demonstrated the REANIMATE project (REAlistic Numerical Image-based Modelling of biological Tissue substratEs), which is a virtual modelling technique that creates highly detailed 3D models of individual cancerous tumours and simulates the delivery of drugs into them.

Pharmacology - Health - 08.11.2019
Immersion in virtual reality scenes of the Arctic helps to ease people’s pain
Watching immersive 3D videos of icy Arctic scenes helps to relieve burning pain and could hold hope for treating chronic pain, a study has found. Scientists from Imperial College London have found that using virtual reality headsets could combat increased sensitivity to pain, by immersing people in scenes of icebergs, frigid oceans and sprawling icescapes.

Health - 07.11.2019
Female mosquitoes that have mated are more likely to transmit malaria
Hormones received from male mosquitoes during mating boost the likelihood of female mosquitoes transmitting malaria to people. Only female mosquitoes bite humans and pass on malaria. However, the new study shows that males can also influence malaria transmission, by making mated females more likely to pass on the parasites.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.11.2019
Potential new target for treatment of inflammatory disease
Researchers led by the University of Birmingham have found a potential new target to treat inflammatory disease. The research, led by scientists at the University of Birmingham's Institute of Inflammation and Ageing , Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, and Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, publishes today in Cell Metabolism.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.11.2019
Simple blood test could better predict both kidney disease and cardiovascular risk
Researchers have found a better way to test for kidney disease using a simple blood test that is affordable and although it is available in NHS laboratories is not yet widely used. Kidney disease and cardiovascular risk could be easier to predict using a simple blood test.

Psychology - 07.11.2019
Diverse neighbourhoods linked to better mental health in White British youths
White British young people living in more ethnically diverse deprived neighbourhoods have better mental health than those living in "white working-class" neighbourhoods, according to a new UCL study. The study found there was no difference in the mental health of ethnic minority youths by whether they lived in neighbourhoods of differing levels of ethnic density and ethnic diversity.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.11.2019
Flu shot can provide effective immunity for people living with HIV
People who are being treated for HIV can gain effective protection against seasonal flu with the influenza (flu) vaccine, new findings confirm. Since people living with HIV can have an impaired immune system and may be at higher risk of serious illness from flu, they are recommended to get the seasonal influenza vaccine every year.

Materials Science - Transport - 07.11.2019
UK needs to act to prevent electric vehicle battery waste mountain - new study
Recycling technologies for end-of-life lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are not keeping pace with the rapid rise of electric vehicles, storing up a potentially huge waste management problem for the future, according to a new study. A review of lithium ion battery recycling led by the University of Birmingham suggests that, while electric vehicles (EVs) offer a solution for cutting pollution, governments and industry need to act now to develop a robust recycling infrastructure to meet future recycling need.

Environment - Economics / Business - 07.11.2019
Capturing carbon dioxide to make useful products could become big business
Waste carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels could be used to make valuable products such as plastics, fuels and cement, suggests new research. If done correctly, using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) to make useful products would also help offset the costs of mitigating climate change, argue scientists in a review .

Innovation - 06.11.2019
Imperial startup launches flagship store in the heart of London
DnaNudge, co-founded by Imperial professor Chris Toumazou, has launched a flagship store in London's Covent Garden. DnaNudge offers the world's first DNA-based service for healthier food choices. The new Covent Garden store provides on-the-spot DNA testing, which is then used to 'nudge' users to make healthier food shopping choices.

Environment - 06.11.2019
Wasps as an effective pest control for agriculture
Common wasp species could be valuable at sustainably managing crop pests, finds a new UCL-led experimental study in Brazil. The study, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , found that social wasps are effective predators that can manage pests on two high-value crops, maize and sugarcane.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 05.11.2019
3,000-year-old Egyptian wheat genome sequenced for first time
The genome of an ancient Egyptian wheat has been sequenced for the first time by a UCL-led team, revealing historical patterns of crop movement and domestication. The study was carried out by an international research team, which mapped the genetic code from a sample of wheat harvested over 3,000 years ago, that was excavated in 1924 from the Hememiah North Spur site in Egypt.
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