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Astronomy / Space Science - 19.11.2019
Evidence of missing neutron star
The leftovers from a spectacular supernova that revolutionised our understanding of how stars end their lives have finally been spotted by astronomers at Cardiff University. The scientists claim to have found evidence of the location of a neutron star that was left behind when a massive star ended its life in a gigantic explosion, leading to a famous supernova dubbed Supernova 1987A.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.11.2019
Technique to preserve sexual function after prostate cancer surgery
A UCLH and UCL led trial of a technique to preserve men's sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery has begun to recruit participants across the UK. The trial of the NeuroSAFE procedure - designed to avoid the removal during surgery of nerves near the prostate which are important for sexual function - is being led by UCLH consultant urological surgeon Greg Shaw and sponsored by UCL.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 19.11.2019
Ayahuasca compound changes brainwaves to vivid ’waking-dream’ state
Scientists have peered inside the brain to show how taking DMT affects human consciousness by significantly altering the brain's electrical activity. DMT (or dimethyltryptamine) is one of the main psychoactive constituents in ayahuasca, the psychedelic brew traditionally made from vines and leaves of the Amazon rainforest.

Pharmacology - 18.11.2019
Scientists and schoolkids find family soups have antimalarial properties
London schoolchildren have found that some of their families' soup recipes have antimalarial properties, with the help of Imperial scientists. Researchers from Imperial College London helped the schoolchildren test their family soup broths for activity against the malaria parasite. We may have to look beyond the chemistry shelf for new drugs, and natural remedies shouldn't be off our watch list, as artemisinin shows.

Environment - Chemistry - 18.11.2019
Climate change could double greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater ecosystems
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Environment - 18.11.2019
’Rapid increase’ in global wind speeds
Wind speeds across the globe have increased rapidly over the past decade signalling good news for the renewable energy industry, scientists say. New findings have shown that a worrying trend of decreasing wind speeds since the 1970s, a phenomenon known as global terrestrial stilling, has now been reversed with a significant increase observed since 2010.

Environment - 18.11.2019
Saving ’Half-Earth’ for nature would affect over a billion people
For Cambridge students For our researchers Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University Equality and diversity

Environment - Economics / Business - 18.11.2019
Climate change expert outlines humanity’s role in speeding global warming
Climate change expert Professor Sir David Hendry will explore how humanity has accelerated global warming when he delivers the annual China Institute Li Siguang lecture at the University of Birmingham on Wednesday 20th November. And his talk 'Climate Change in the Long Run' will illustrate how climatologists, volcanologists, dendrochronologists, meteorologists, geophysicists and health scientists are working together to tackle climate change and its consequences.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.11.2019
Scientists make vampire bats ’glow’ to simulate vaccine spread
Scientists have used 'glowing' fluorescent gel to estimate the potential effectiveness of spreadable vaccines to control diseases in wild bats. The study - led by researchers at the Universities of Glasgow and Michigan, and published today in Nature Ecology and Evolution - found that a low effort vaccination programme could substantially reduce rabies transmission in wild vampire bats, thereby reducing the risk of lethal infections in humans and livestock.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.11.2019
Body’s protection shield
Scientists have discovered a way to manipulate the body's own immune response to help boost tissue repair. The findings, published in Current Biology today [18 Nov], reveal a new network of protective factors to shield cells against damage. This discovery, made by University of Bristol researchers, could significantly benefit patients undergoing surgery by speeding recovery times and lowering the risk of complication.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2019
Researchers take first step towards genetic test for childhood short-sightedness
Researchers from the Universities of Cardiff and Bristol have devised a test that could in future help to identify children at risk of developing a very common eye condition. Short-sightedness, or myopia, usually develops during childhood and is thought to affect up to one in three people in the UK.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2019
New imaging technique unlocks secrets of the zebrafish heart
A new type of microscopy is helping to unlock the secrets of the zebrafish's heart - which could also teach us more about how human hearts form, grow and heal. Video In a new paper published today , researchers from the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh describe how they have developed a new method to capture 3D video images of the growing hearts of zebrafish embryos for the first time.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.11.2019
Link between inflammation and mental sluggishness shown in new study
Scientists at the University of Birmingham in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam have uncovered a possible explanation for the mental sluggishness that often accompanies illness. An estimated 12M UK citizens have a chronic medical condition, and many of them report severe mental fatigue that they characterize as 'sluggishness' or 'brain fog'.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.11.2019
Community cooking programme improves eating in young children and families
Community cooking programme improves eating in young children and families A Glasgow-based community cooking programme has been shown to improve family eating and could help to combat poor diets. The six week NHS programme, which included one cookery class a week and practical guidance on how to choose healthier foods was assessed by researchers at the University of Glasgow and deemed to have a positive impact on families' cooking and children's eating habits.

Pharmacology - Chemistry - 14.11.2019
Could synthetic molecules provide a general treatment for Cystic Fibrosis?
A new treatment for lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) for which there remains no cure could potentially benefit all patients, according to a University of Bristol study published in Chemical Science. The findings are an important step towards a new therapy addressing the fundamental cause of cystic fibrosis.

Veterinary - 14.11.2019
UCL bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct report
In February of this year, UCL launched a new online reporting tool called Report + Support to make reporting issues of bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct easier. Staff and students can report 'anonymously' or 'contact an advisor' to find out their options for support and resolution. Report + Support has been in place for over six months, and as part of the commitment to improve transparency and build trust and confidence in reporting, UCL has published a Six Months Insights Report.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.11.2019
Evolution can reconfigure gene networks to deal with environmental change
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have unravelled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas' ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes. By mapping networks of genes to the physiological responses of ancient and modern waterfleas (Daphnia), the researchers, based in the University's School of Biosciences , were able to show that a cluster of over 800 genes, many of them involved in metabolic processes, evolved to become "plastic", or flexible.

Health - 13.11.2019
Chronic adversity may impair ability to cope with stress
People exposed to a lifetime of psychosocial adversity may have an impaired ability to produce the dopamine levels needed for coping with acutely stressful situations, according to a new UCL-led study. The findings, published in the journal eLife , may help explain why long-term exposure to psychological trauma and abuse increases the risk of mental illness and addiction.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.11.2019
Space rock research could reveal origins of Earth’s oceans
The return of a space probe bearing samples from a distant asteroid is being eagerly anticipated by researchers from the University of Glasgow and Curtin University in Australia. Scientists from the School of Geographical and Earth Sciences will receive three miniscule precious pieces of the asteroid Ryugu when the uncrewed Hayabusa2 mission returns to Earth late next year after six years in space.

Social Sciences - 13.11.2019
University reading lists dominated by white European men
University reading lists are not representative of the student body and tend towards overrepresentation of white, male and Eurocentric viewpoints, a new study from UCL has found. The study, published in Higher Education, analysed 144 authors of Social Science papers and 146 authors of Science papers included in two university reading lists, gathering data on gender, ethnicity and the country in which the researchers' affiliated institutions were based.
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