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Economics/Business



Results 41 - 52 of 52.


Health - Economics / Business - 25.04.2018
Labelling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink more, study suggests
Wines and beers labelled as lower in alcohol strength may increase the total amount of alcoholic drink consumed, according to a study published in the journal Health Psychology . The study was carried out by the Behaviour and Health Research Unit at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the Centre for Addictive Behaviours Research at London South Bank University.

Economics / Business - Law - 25.04.2018
Clearing up online confusion for consumers - top tips from the experts
PA 75/18 Consumers often fail to see important information about online services - which can lead to unexpected costs, according to new research. When you are buying a service online, what do you look at on a website? Connection Services (for example) offer connection to a small number of organisation's customer service phone lines -for a cost.

Sport - Economics / Business - 23.04.2018
Football makes fans less happy
Football makes fans less happy The pain felt by football fans after a defeat is more than double the joy of winning, according to researchers at the University of Sussex. The team analysed three million responses from 32,000 people on a smartphone app called Mappiness, which periodically asks users how they are feeling, what they are doing, where they are and who they are with.

Computer Science - Economics / Business - 04.04.2018
Online tool can measure individuals’ likelihood to fall for internet scams
Researchers have developed an online questionnaire which measures a range of personality traits to identify individuals who are more likely to fall victim to internet scams and other forms of cybercrime. Scams have been around for hundreds of years, and over the centuries, they haven't really changed that much - the only difference now is with the internet, it requires a lot less effort to do it.

Health - Economics / Business - 03.04.2018
Taxes on soft drinks, alcohol and tobacco are of most benefit to the poor
Taxes on tobacco, alcohol, sugar-sweetened drinks and snack foods may benefit poorer households the most, according to new research. The study lead by Professor Franco Sassi, Professor of International Health Policy & Economics at Imperial College Business School is one of five papers published today in The Lancet which collectively argue that taxes are a powerful response to rising rates of chronic diseases and an inescapable solution to tackling non-communicable diseases (NCDs) .

Sport - Economics / Business - 20.03.2018
Why it doesn’t pay to be just nice – you also need to be intelligent
Researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Minnesota and Heidelberg devised a series of games to find out which factors lead to cooperative behaviour when people interact in social and workplace situations. Their findings, due to be published in the Journal of Political Economy , showed that people with a higher IQ displayed 'significantly higher' levels of cooperation, which in turn led to them earning more money as part of the game.

Economics / Business - 15.03.2018
England has one of the lowest levels of financial literacy
One-in-three adults in England and Northern Ireland (NI) cannot work out the correct change from a shopping trip, according to new research from UCL and University of Cambridge. The findings show that adults in England and NI perform worse on everyday financial numeracy tasks than adults in many other developed countries - even when using a calculator.

Health - Economics / Business - 13.03.2018
Academics urge rethink on 28-day prescriptions for people with long-term conditions
The widely adopted practice of issuing 28-day rather than longer duration prescriptions for people with long-term conditions lacks a robust evidence base and should be reconsidered, according to a study published in the British Journal of General Practice today [Tuesday 13 March]. Related research shows that considerable savings could be made by the NHS switching to longer prescriptions.

Economics / Business - 22.01.2018
Human smugglers operate as ’independent traders’, study finds
First study to model the organisation behind trade in illegal border crossings shows no "Mafia-like" monopoly of routes from Africa into Europe via Mediterranean. Instead, myriad independent smugglers compete in open markets that have emerged at every stage of the journey. This is a far cry from how Mafia-like organisations operate Paolo Campana Latest research shows a lack of overarching coordination or the involvement of any "kingpin"-style monopolies in the criminal operations illegally transporting people from the Horn of Africa into Northern Europe via Libya.

Economics / Business - Innovation - 19.01.2018
Gut instinct trumps evidence at the polls
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.

Economics / Business - Innovation - 18.01.2018
How ’gut instinct’ trumps ’evidence’ when voters go to the polls
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.

Economics / Business - Innovation - 01.01.2018
’Gut instinct’ trumps ’evidence’ when voting
People are more likely to go with their gut and trust personal opinions irrespective of evidence that might be presented during an election or referendum campaign, according to an important new economic study. A new paper, published by our Department of Economics , shows that voters tend to retain strong attachment to their own opinions even when this is challenged by evidence.