news 2017

« BACK

Social Sciences



Results 41 - 59 of 59.


Health - Social Sciences - 17.05.2017
Loneliness in young adults linked to poor sleep quality
Researchers from King's College London have found a link between loneliness and poor sleep quality in a study of more than 2,000 British young adults. Lonelier people were 24 per cent more likely to feel tired and have difficulty concentrating during the day, according to the study published today in Psychological Medicine .

Social Sciences - Health - 12.05.2017
Suicide in veterans - study finds mixed picture
People who have served in the Armed Forces do not have a greater risk of suicide overall than people who have never served in the military, but there is an increased risk in certain groups, according to a study by the University of Glasgow. Previous studies on suicide risk in veterans have shown a mixed picture but recent UK studies have generally shown them to be at no greater risk than the general public, whilst both Falklands and Gulf War veterans have been shown to have a lower risk of suicide.

Social Sciences - 11.05.2017
Right-or left-handedness affects sign language comprehension
Researchers at the University of Birmingham found that at least 1400 new lettings have been made available across the West Midlands in the last few years, with 800 tenants now living in properties managed by Social Lettings Agencies (SLAs). SLAs are a relatively new approach in England, and aim to access good quality, affordable and reasonably secure homes in the private rented sector for people who might otherwise be homeless or facing a long wait for social housing.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 05.05.2017
Birds choose their neighbours based on personality
Birds of a feather nest together, according to a new study which has found that male great tits ( Parus major ) choose neighbours with similar personalities to their own. Oxford University researchers investigated whether the personality of birds influences their social lives - in particular who they choose to nest near.

Social Sciences - 03.05.2017
Fish step up to lead when predators are near
Fish step up to lead when predators are near
Researchers from the University of Bristol have discovered that some fish within a shoal take on the responsibilities of leader when they are under threat from predators. The findings suggest that the majority of decisions made by the leader fish are followed, making the shoals more effective. And it was the shoals where fish had defined leader/follower roles that were more evident in areas where predators were more prevalent.

Religions - Social Sciences - 24.03.2017
Study into who is least afraid of death
A new study examines all robust, available data on how fearful we are of what happens once we shuffle off this mortal coil.  They find that atheists are among those least afraid of dying...and, perhaps not surprisingly, the very religious. Religion has long been thought to be a solution to the problem of death.

Social Sciences - 23.03.2017
Landmark signing provides boost to Birmingham Life Sciences
Researchers at the University of Birmingham worked with children, young people and their families living in a new urban development in India to understand the everyday experiences of urban transformation - with the results informing the future development of Indian cities. Their research with 350 participants has led to findings which are intended to help make other cities across India, indeed any cities undergoing change, citizen-friendly and sustainable.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 16.03.2017
Natural measures to prevent floods are not a ’silver bullet’
Research has revealed that the more often people eat with others the more likely they are to feel happy and satisfied with their lives. New research from the University of Oxford has revealed that the more often people eat with others, the more likely they are to feel happy and satisfied with their lives.

Career - Social Sciences - 16.03.2017
Social eating connects communities
A writing group for PhD students and early career academics has helped to boost productivity and reduce stress for Oxford University humanities students.

Social Sciences - 07.03.2017
Scientists pinpoint sensory links between autism and synaesthesia
Scientists pinpoint sensory links between autism and synaesthesia
Sussex scientists pinpoint sensory links between autism and synaesthesia Concrete links between the symptoms of autism and synaesthesia have been discovered and clarified for the first time, according to new research by psychologists at the University of Sussex. The study, conducted by world-leading experts in both conditions at Sussex and the University of Cambridge and published in the journal Scientific Reports, found that both groups experience remarkably similar heightened sensory sensitivity, despite clear differences in communicative ability and social skills.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.03.2017
Substance misuse and binge drinking higher in young people in foster care
Young people in foster care have higher rates of weekly smoking, binge drinking, recent cannabis use, and poorer life satisfaction, compared to children living with their parents or other family members, new research by Cardiff University shows. These adverse outcomes are partly explained by a tendency for children living in care to report poorer quality social relationships with peers and school staff, say the researchers, from the University's Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer).

Social Sciences - Administration - 01.03.2017
Bristol to improve signposting to specialist support for domestic violence and abuse in UK military families
Bristol to improve signposting to specialist support for domestic violence and abuse in UK military families
The University of Bristol has been awarded a grant of Ā£46,938 by the Forces in Mind Trust for a 15-month study to investigate domestic violence and abuse (DVA) in UK military families. The research will investigate what criteria might constitute specialist DVA provision for this group, and what service providers, if any, already meet these criteria, in order to help improve signposting to the service providers best placed to meet the needs of UK military families suffering DVA.

Social Sciences - 10.02.2017
Key friendships vital for effective human social networks
Key friendships vital for effective human social networks
Close friendships facilitate the exchange of information and culture, making social networks more effective for cultural transmission, according to new UCL research that used wireless tracking technology to map social interactions in remote hunter-gatherer populations. The research demonstrates how increased network efficiency is achieved through investment in a few strong links between non-kin friends connecting unrelated families, as well as showing that strong friendships are more important than family ties in predicting levels of shared knowledge among individuals.

Social Sciences - 07.02.2017
Is pride a sin or an incentive?
Pride has a bad reputation. Christians classified it as one of the seven deadly sins and traditional peoples everywhere consider it bad luck. But new research findings suggest that pride serves an important social function and is universal in this respect. The paper in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , suggests we have evolved to seek the admiration of others.

Social Sciences - 06.02.2017
New study aims to understand the reasons why Female Genital Cutting persists
New study aims to understand the reasons why Female Genital Cutting persists
The harmful health consequences of Female Genital Cutting (FGC) are well-established and the elimination of this practice is a priority for policy makers across the world. Examining the prevalence of this behaviour has been the subject of a new study by evolutionary anthropologists from the University of Bristol which, it is hoped, will provide a greater understanding of why FGC persists and inform eradication programmes.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 23.01.2017
Biosocial science: The murky history of the nature and nurture debate
Biosocial science: The murky history of the nature and nurture debate
The idea that social behaviours are biologically influenced is controversial, but may provide new views on how our environment influences who we are and what we do, writes Daphne Martschenko from the Faculty of Education. Self-righteousness, gratitude, sympathy, sincerity, and guilt - what if these social behaviours are biologically influenced, encoded within our genes and shaped by the forces of evolution to promote the survival of the human species' Does free will truly exist if our genes are inherited and our environment is a series of events set in motion before we are born?

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 11.01.2017
150 years of British history
What could be learnt about the world if you could read the news from over 100 local newspapers for a period of 150 years? This is what a team of researchers from Cardiff University and the University of Bristol have done using of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to analyse 150 years of British regional newspapers.

Social Sciences - 10.01.2017
Frankly, do we give a damn...' Study finds links between swearing and honesty
Frankly, do we give a damn...’ Study finds links between swearing and honesty
It's long been associated with anger and coarseness but profanity can have another, more positive connotation. Psychologists have learned that people who frequently curse are being more honest. Writing in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science a team of researchers from the Netherlands, the UK, the USA and Hong Kong report that people who use profanity are less likely to be associated with lying and deception.

Social Sciences - 06.01.2017
Your health! The benefits of social drinking
New research shows that moderate alcohol consumption may be linked to improved wellbeing, thanks to the improved social interaction associated with having a drink with friends at a local pub. While most studies warn of the health risks of alcohol consumption, researchers at the University of Oxford have looked at whether having a drink may play a role in improving social cohesion, given its long association with human social activities.