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Results 21 - 40 of 59.


Social Sciences - Sport - 19.09.2017
Winner takes all: Success enhances taste for luxury goods, study suggests
Footballers in flashy cars, City workers in Armani suits, reality TV celebrities sipping expensive champagne while sitting in hot tubs: what drives people to purchase luxury goods' New research suggests that it may be a sense of being a 'winner' - but that contrary to expectations, it is not driven by testosterone.

Social Sciences - Mathematics - 24.08.2017
Ending the silence on older victims of rape
Many people over 60 in the UK are victims of sexual violence, according to Durham University research. Despite the pervasive stereotypes of what constitutes a "real rape" - a young woman being attacked by a stranger - the research has uncovered that older people are victims too. The study shows that people over 60 are more likely to be raped by an acquaintance either in their own home or a care home.

Economics / Business - Social Sciences - 23.08.2017
Personality drives purchasing of luxury goods
People who are 'extraverted' and on low incomes buy more luxury goods than their introverted peers to compensate for the experience of low financial status, finds new UCL research. The study, published today in Psychological Science , used real life spending data from UK bank accounts to investigate the spending habits of richer and poorer people with different personality types.

Social Sciences - Health - 11.08.2017
August: hazardous pesticides | News | University of Bristol
Global policies on access to highly hazardous pesticides - commonly ingested in acts of self-poisoning and suicide in rural Asia - should focus on national bans, rather than safe storage, according to two studies involving University of Bristol academics in The Lancet and The Lancet Global Health journals.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 27.07.2017
Isotopes in prehistoric cattle teeth suggest a variety of herding strategies were used during the Neolithic
Over the course of the Neolithic period, secondary products from cattle such as milk, manure and animal power became more important. This led to larger herds, and the increased demand for grazing resources could have led to herding strategies that took advantage of grazing grounds away from the permanent settlement.

Social Sciences - 20.07.2017
Young people want more choice in GCSE experience
A new study by researchers from the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) at Cardiff University and Queen's University Belfast has found that students in Wales and Northern Ireland want more choice and fairness when it comes to their GCSE experience, including the subject selection process and the pressure to take on particular academic subjects.

Health - Social Sciences - 10.07.2017
Questionnaires can be a good predictor of survival rates in multiple sclerosis
The way in which patients with multiple sclerosis answer questionnaires could help to predict their survival rate from the disease, a study has found. The research, carried out at Imperial in collaboration with University Medical Centre Göttingen , shows that MS patients with higher scores on a standardised questionnaire were more likely to die in the next 10 years compared to those who recorded lower scores.

Computer Science - Social Sciences - 26.06.2017
Detecting riots with Twitter
Social media can be an invaluable source of information for police when managing major disruptive events, new research from Cardiff University has shown. An analysis of data taken from the London riots in 2011 showed that computer systems could automatically scan through Twitter and detect serious incidents, such as shops being broken in to and cars being set alight, before they were reported to the Metropolitan Police Service.

Social Sciences - Health - 21.06.2017
Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research
Being married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from the University of Bath's School of Management. The study shows that married men have a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) than their non-married counterparts, adding approximately three pounds or 1.4kg to the scales.

Social Sciences - 14.06.2017
Using inhalers can lead to mocking and social exclusion for teenagers
Using inhalers can lead to mocking and social exclusion for teenagers
Teenagers with asthma are embarrassed to use their inhalers even though they could prevent life-threatening asthma attacks, a new study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has found. The research, published in BMJ Open , analysed posts written by teenagers and their parents from Asthma UK â?'s online forum between 2006 and 2016.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.06.2017
New tool helps pick puppies most suited to guide dog training
Photo © Guide Dogs UK Animal behaviour experts at the University of Nottingham have developed a new tool which can be used to predict a young dog's likelihood of successfully completing guide dog training. Working dog organisations like the charity Guide Dogs, who funded the research, need to regularly assess the behaviour of the dogs they breed for training as not all of them turn out to be suited to the role.

Social Sciences - Computer Science - 08.06.2017
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
People who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool co-developed by a computer scientist at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Dr Gareth Tyson and researchers from the University of Edinburgh have trained computer models to spot social media users who make up information about themselves â?- known as catfishes.

Computer Science - Social Sciences - 07.06.2017
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
Fake online profiles easier to fish out with new software tool
People who use fake profiles online could be more easily identified, thanks to a new tool developed by computer scientists. Researchers have trained computer models to spot social media users who make up information about themselves - known as catfishes. The system is designed to identify users who are dishonest about their age or gender.

Social Sciences - Law - 06.06.2017
Culture affects how people deceive others say researchers
Culture affects how people deceive others say researchers
Psychologists have discovered that people's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background. Psychologists have discovered that people's language changes when they lie depending on their cultural background. Professor Paul Taylor from Lancaster University said: "Science has long known that people's use of language changes when they lie.

Social Sciences - 31.05.2017
Social media users adapt personas specifically for platforms
Researchers at King's College London, working in collaboration with Penn State University, have found that social media users adapt their behaviour to individual social media platforms in a way that is clearly identifiable and learnable when tested on a model. Using the webpages of 116,998 About.me users, the research team extracted matched user profiles on several major social networks including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram and found that different genders and age groups adapt their behaviour differently from each other.

Social Sciences - Administration - 26.05.2017
Researchers looking for men to take part in new domestic violence study
Researchers looking for men to take part in new domestic violence study
Researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care are looking for men who are concerned that they are, or have been, abusive in their relationships with women to take part in a new study that will help improve how we support men in changing their behaviour. Abusive behaviour can involve a range of actions, including physically hurting someone, pushing or shoving them, frightening them, or controlling or pressuring them into doing what you want or not doing what they want.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 25.05.2017
IVF babies do not have lower cognitive skills than naturally conceived children
New research shows that between the ages of three and 11, children conceived artificially can be linked with better scores for reading and verbal tests than children conceived naturally. Researchers analysed data of hundreds of UK children who had been born through IVF or ICSI (when the man has a low sperm count), testing the same groups of children every few years up to the age of 11.

Social Sciences - 22.05.2017
Record levels of in-work poverty revealed
More than half (60%) of people living in poverty in the UK live in a household where someone is in work, the highest figure recorded, according to a new Cardiff University report. The report by Dr Rod Hick and Dr Alba Lanau from Cardiff University's School of Social Sciences, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shines a new light on the growing problem of in-work poverty in the UK.

Social Sciences - 19.05.2017
Grammar schools fail to help middle-income families
Grammar schools fail to help middle-income families
Selective education harms the university prospects of bright pupils who just miss out on a place at a grammar school, according to new research from the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), University of Bristol and University of Warwick. Primary school children in areas with a selective education system who perform well in Key Stage 2 assessments but do not manage to get into a grammar school are 3 percentage points less likely to attend university and 8 percentage points less likely to attend a high quality university compared to similar peers in non-selective areas.

Social Sciences - 19.05.2017
Grammar schools fail to help middle-income families
Grammar schools fail to help middle-income families
Selective education harms the university prospects of bright pupils who just miss out on a place at a grammar school, according to new research from the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), University of Bristol and University of Warwick. Primary school children in areas with a selective education system who perform well in Key Stage 2 assessments but do not manage to get into a grammar school are 3 percentage points less likely to attend university and 8 percentage points less likely to attend a high-quality university compared to similar peers in non-selective areas.