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Results 41 - 47 of 47.


Health - Psychology - 10.03.2017
Cannabis compound may help treat anxiety and substance abuse disorders
A review of research into the therapeutic potential of Cannabidiol (CBD) - a major nonpsychoactive compound found in cannabis - has shown there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that it could help in the treatment of anxiety-related and substance abuse disorders. However, more studies are needed to determine the psychological, pharmacological and brain mechanisms involved.

Health - Psychology - 08.03.2017
Opinion: New ways to treat depression in teenagers
Opinion: New ways to treat depression in teenagers
Prime Minister Theresa May recently announced measures to improve mental health support at every stage of a person's life, with an emphasis on early intervention for children and young people. Writing in The Conversation, Professor Ian Goodyer from the Department of Psychiatry looks at the options for helping teenagers.

Health - Psychology - 22.02.2017
Cat ownership not linked to mental health problems
Cat ownership not linked to mental health problems
New UCL research has found no link between cat ownership and psychotic symptoms, casting doubt on previous suggestions that people who grew up with cats are at higher risk of mental illness. Recent research has suggested that cat ownership might contribute to some mental disorders, because cats are the primary host of the common parasite Toxoplasma Gondii (T.

Health - Psychology - 14.02.2017
Poverty has devastating impact on children's mental health
Poverty has devastating impact on children’s mental health
New University of Liverpool research - published today in The Lancet Public Healthá – shows that children who move into poverty are more likely to suffer from social, emotional and behavioural problems than children who remain out of poverty. The UK Government has recently questioned whether the relative measure of income poverty used in this research (a household income that is less than 60% of the national average) is a good indicator of children's life chances.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 26.01.2017
Pets are a child's best friend, not their siblings
Pets are a child’s best friend, not their siblings
Children get more satisfaction from relationships with their pets than with their brothers or sisters, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. Children also appear to get on even better with their animal companions than with siblings. The fact that pets cannot understand or talk back may even be a benefit as it means they are completely non-judgmental Matt Cassells The research adds to increasing evidence that household pets may have a major influence on child development, and could have a positive impact on children's social skills and emotional well-being.

Environment - Psychology - 23.01.2017
Psychological 'vaccine' could help immunise public against 'fake news' on climate change - study
Psychological ‘vaccine’ could help immunise public against ‘fake news’ on climate change - study
New research finds that misinformation on climate change can psychologically cancel out the influence of accurate statements. However, if legitimate facts are delivered with an 'inoculation' - a warning dose of misinformation - some of the positive influence is preserved. There will always be people completely resistant to change, but we tend to find there is room for most people to change their minds, even just a little Sander van der Linden In medicine, vaccinating against a virus involves exposing a body to a weakened version of the threat, enough to build a tolerance.

Physics - Psychology - 05.01.2017
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
The largest-ever smartphone-based study examining the relationship between physical activity and happiness has found that even minimal levels of activity can have a positive effect on happiness. In order to be happier, you don't have to go out and run a marathon. Jason Rentfrow A new study, based on reports from more than 10,000 individuals, has found that physical activity, whether or not it is classified as exercise, can have a positive effect on emotional well-being.