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Results 61 - 80 of 81.


Physics - 20.04.2017
Widely used engineering technique has unintended consequences new research reveals
Felix Hofmann and Edmund Tarleton, both authors of the paper, at the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument at the Department of Materials, University of Oxford, UK. A technique that revolutionised scientists' ability to manipulate and study materials at the nano-scale may have dramatic unintended consequences, new Oxford University research reveals.

Physics - 20.04.2017
Widely used engineering technique has unintended consequences
Felix Hofmann and Edmund Tarleton, both authors of the paper, at the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument at the Department of Materials, University of Oxford, UK. A technique that revolutionised scientists' ability to manipulate and study materials at the nano-scale may have dramatic unintended consequences, new Oxford University research reveals.

Physics - Chemistry - 28.03.2017
Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easier
Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easier
Using sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials. This is the conclusion of a study published today led by researchers in the Department of Physics at Imperial College London, which could ultimately help improve solar energy technologies and be used for new applications, such as using sunlight to break down harmful chemicals.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.03.2017
Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies
Universe’s ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies
Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies (22 March 2017) Astronomers have developed a way to detect the ultraviolet (UV) background of the Universe, which could help explain why there are so few small galaxies in the cosmos. UV radiation is invisible but shows up as visible red light when it interacts with gas.

Physics - 21.03.2017
New particles discovered in CERN experiment with Warwick physicist
A new group of particles which have long been hiding in plain sight have finally been discovered thanks to the incredibly sensitive LHCb experiment at CERN - involving a physicist from the University of Warwick. Professor Tim Gershon from the Department of Physics is the UK spokesperson for the LHCb, otherwise known as the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

Physics - Environment - 20.03.2017
'Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
‘Fingerprint’ technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
Researchers at Lancaster University have found a way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution. Worldwide, amphibian populations are declining due to habitat loss, disease and pollution which is cited as a major threat to their survival. Scientists publishing in Scientific Reports , have found evidence of stress in tadpoles taken from ponds most impacted by pollution caused by nutrients and pesticides.

Physics - Environment - 17.03.2017
Why water splashes: new theory reveals secrets
Reason why raindrops and spilt coffee splash revealed by University of Warwick research New theory uncovers - for first time - what happens in space between liquid drop and surface to cause splash Microscopic layer of air - 50 times smaller than a human hair - trapped between liquid and surface can prevent liquid spreading on surface Scale comparable to a 1cm layer of air stopping a tsunami wave spreading across a beach Research published in top Physics & Mathematics journal New research from the University of Warwick generates fresh insight into how a raindrop or spilt coffee splashes.

Art and Design - Physics - 15.03.2017
Quantum physics offers insight into music expressivity
Quantum physics offers insight into music expressivity
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) are bringing us closer to understanding the musical experience through a novel approach to analysing a common musical effect known as vibrato. Vibrato is the up-down oscillation in pitch introduced during instrumental or vocal performance, intended to add expressivity and to facilitate sound projection, and commonly used in opera.

Physics - Health - 08.03.2017
Perceived weight discrimination linked to physical inactivity
Perceived weight discrimination linked to physical inactivity
People who feel that they have been discriminated against because of their weight are much less likely to be physically active than people who don't perceive that they have suffered any such stigmatisation, according to new research led by UCL. The research was published in the journal BMJ Open .  It was the first study to examine the relationship between weight discrimination and physical activity in a large population sample.

Physics - Computer Science - 07.03.2017
Legacy of brilliant young scientist is a major leap in quantum computing
Legacy of brilliant young scientist is a major leap in quantum computing
Researchers from the University of Bristol and Université Libre de Bruxelles have theoretically shown how to write programs for random circuitry in quantum computers. The breakthrough, published in the New Journal of Physics , is based on the work of first author, Dr Nick Russell, who tragically lost his life in a climbing accident last year.

Physics - Life Sciences - 07.03.2017
Creating crystals from gold
Creating crystals from gold
Scientists from Imperial College London have revealed how materials such as gold can help create protein crystals. The team, from the Department of Surgery and Cancer , hope their findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports , could aid the discovery of new medicines and treatments. Gold doesn't react with proteins, due to its inert nature, which makes it an ideal material to create crystals.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.02.2017
Molecular phenomenon discovered by advanced NMR facility
Cutting edge tech shows molecule self-assembling into different forms passing from solution state to solid state and back again - a curious phenomenon in science - says University of Warwick research Phenomenon discovered using state-of-the-art national solid-state NMR facility at Warwick Research published by Chemistry: A European Journal - designated as 'Very Important Paper' Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling into di

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.02.2017
Breakthrough in ‘wonder’ materials paves way for flexible tech
Electronic devices set to become smaller, flexible and highly efficient - following University of Warwick research on 2D materials Researchers measured the electronic structure of stacks of 2D 'wonder' materials - atomically thin, highly conductive, and extremely strong materials - for first time Understanding the electronic structures will allow scientists to find optimal materials for efficient semiconductors in nano-circuitry Gadgets are set

Physics - 03.02.2017
Research review shows that safety is valued too low
Research review shows that safety is valued too low
New research has shown that the benchmark used by the Office for Nuclear Regulation for judging how much should be spent on nuclear safety has no basis in evidence and places insufficient value on human life. The review suggests it may need to be ten times higher - between £16 million and £22 million per life saved.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.01.2017
Rapid gas flares discovered in white dwarf star for the first time
In February 2016 the dwarf nova SS Cyg anomalous outburst lasted for more than 3 weeks. Rapid radio flaring was seen throughout the outburst and the most intriguing behaviour was towards the end of the outburst, where a fast, luminous, giant flare, peaking at ~20 mJy and lasting for 15 minutes was observed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.01.2017
White dwarf star discovered emitting rapid gas flares for the first time
In February 2016 the dwarf nova SS Cyg anomalous outburst lasted for more than 3 weeks. Rapid radio flaring was seen throughout the outburst and the most intriguing behaviour was towards the end of the outburst, where a fast, luminous, giant flare, peaking at ~20 mJy and lasting for 15 minutes was observed.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.01.2017
Graphene's sleeping superconductivity awakens
Graphene’s sleeping superconductivity awakens
Since its discovery in 2004, scientists have believed that graphene may have the innate ability to superconduct. Now Cambridge researchers have found a way to activate that previously dormant potential. It has long been postulated that graphene should undergo a superconducting transition, but can't. The idea of this experiment was, if we couple graphene to a superconductor, can we switch that intrinsic superconductivity on?

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2017
Hunting hidden supermassive black holes
Hunting hidden supermassive black holes
Monster black holes sometimes play a cosmic game of hide and seek, shrouding themselves from view behind giant clouds of gas and dust, according to new research. Scientists believe supermassive black holes lurk at the centres of most big galaxies, but many are hidden from the view of most telescopes.

Physics - Psychology - 05.01.2017
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
The largest-ever smartphone-based study examining the relationship between physical activity and happiness has found that even minimal levels of activity can have a positive effect on happiness. In order to be happier, you don't have to go out and run a marathon. Jason Rentfrow A new study, based on reports from more than 10,000 individuals, has found that physical activity, whether or not it is classified as exercise, can have a positive effect on emotional well-being.

Electroengineering - Physics - 04.01.2017
Beam me up, Scotty – build a portable acoustic tractor beam at home for less than £70
Beam me up, Scotty – build a portable acoustic tractor beam at home for less than £70
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol have shown it's possible to create a simplified tractor beam using readily available parts with a total cost of less than £70. Tractor beams are mysterious rays that can grab and attract objects. The concept has been shown in science-fiction movies such as Star Wars or Star Trek and scientists have developed the theory using lasers.