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Results 41 - 54 of 54.


Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 02.05.2017
Earliest relative of Brachiosaurus dinosaur found in France
Earliest relative of Brachiosaurus dinosaur found in France
Scientists have re-examined an overlooked museum fossil and discovered that it is the earliest member of the titanosauriform family of dinosaurs. The fossil, which the researchers from Imperial College London and their colleagues in Europe have named Vouivria damparisensis , has been identified as a brachiosaurid sauropod dinosaur.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 28.04.2017
Australian volcanic eruption may have lived on in Aboriginal stories
New research shows that a volcano in northeastern Australia last erupted around 7000 years ago - and stories passed down by the Gugu Badhun Aboriginal people suggest they were there to see it happen. In a paper published in the journal Quaternary Geochronology, geologists based in Scotland and Australia outline how they used a sophisticated rock dating technique to determine when the eruption occurred.

Earth Sciences - 27.04.2017
Natural flood management could have made a 'significant difference' during Storm Desmond
Natural flood management could have made a ‘significant difference’ during Storm Desmond
Extensive natural flood management such as tree planting could reduce flooding even in extreme events like Storm Desmond, according to a new modelling study. Natural Flood Management (NFM) schemes - which include tree planting, pond creation and peatland restoration - have been proposed as a potential way to offset inland flooding but as yet none of these schemes have been implemented extensively enough to directly demonstrate their effectiveness.

Earth Sciences - 17.04.2017
Banned industrial solvent sheds new light on methane mystery
Banned industrial solvent sheds new light on methane mystery
Since 2007, scientists have been searching to find the cause of a sudden and unexpected global rise in atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas, following almost a decade in which concentrations had stayed relatively constant. Recent studies have explored a range of possible causes. Suggestions have included a rise in oil and natural gas extraction, increased emissions from tropical wetlands or increases in emissions from growing East Asian economies.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 04.04.2017
Evidence of Britain’s separation from Europe
Researchers have found evidence of how ancient Britain separated from Europe, which happened in two stages, they report. Nearly 450,000 years ago, when Earth was in the grip of an ice age, ice stretched right across the North Sea, from Britain to Scandinavia. The low sea levels meant that the entire English Channel was dry land, a frozen tundra landscape, crisscrossed by small rivers.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.04.2017
Microbial colonisers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate change
Microbial colonisers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate change
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol have recently shown that ecosystems created by melting glaciers in the Arctic are sensitive to climate change and human activity. Melting ice is exposing vast landscapes that are colonised by simple forms of microbial life. These microbes in Arctic soils must cope with short cool summers and long freezing winters, as well as starvation from nutrients.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.04.2017
University of Birmingham recognised for excellence in cyber security research
Iron particles generated by cities and industry are being dissolved by man-made air pollution and washed into the sea - potentially increasing the amount of greenhouse gases that the world's oceans can absorb, a new study suggests. Scientists have long believed that acids formed from human-generated pollution and natural emissions dissolve iron in airborne particles - increasing the amount of iron to the ocean - but have lacked direct evidence to prove this theory.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 22.03.2017
New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree
New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree
More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge and Natural History Museum in London. Their work suggests that the family groupings need to be rearranged, re-defined and re-named and also that dinosaurs may have originated in the northern hemisphere rather than the southern, as current thinking goes.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 22.03.2017
Ground-breaking fossilised tissue reveals the gradual evolution of crouched legs in birds
Ground-breaking fossilised tissue reveals the gradual evolution of crouched legs in birds
Living birds have a more crouched leg posture compared to their dinosaurian ancestors, which generally are thought to have moved with straighter limbs - similar to the postures of humans. A joint study by researchers from the UK and China, including the University of Bristol, sheds light on how birds shifted toward this more crouched posture.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.03.2017
Natural measures to prevent floods are not a ’silver bullet’ solution
Oxford Martin School research says claims that natural flood management can improve the worst floods are not supported by scientific evidence. Their research in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A concludes that natural measures to manage flooding from rivers can play a valuable role in flood prevention.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 01.03.2017
World's oldest fossils unearthed
World’s oldest fossils unearthed
Remains of microorganisms at least 3,770 million years old have been discovered by an international team led by UCL scientists, providing direct evidence of one of the oldest life forms on Earth. Tiny filaments and tubes formed by bacteria that lived on iron were found encased in quartz layers in the Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt (NSB), Quebec, Canada.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 28.02.2017
First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source
First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered a major source of an important greenhouse gas in the Tropical Pacific Ocean for the first time. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, and a major contributor to increasing global temperatures. The largest pool of marine methane on Earth spans from the coast of Central America to Hawaii in the Tropical Pacific Ocean.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 23.02.2017
Space dust deploy bubble parachutes on their fiery descent, scientists discover
Space dust deploy bubble parachutes on their fiery descent, scientists discover
Bubbles acting like parachutes are deployed by some cosmic dust particles on their entry into Earth's atmosphere, preventing them from burning up. Think of microscopic rice bubbles made of molten rock and you get the picture about what this cosmic dust looks like. Dr Matt Genge Department of Earth Science and Engineering This is the conclusion of a new study carried out by a researcher from Imperial College London.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 14.02.2017
Ancient fossil reveals first evidence of live birth in animals thought to lay eggs
Ancient fossil reveals first evidence of live birth in animals thought to lay eggs
The first ever evidence of live birth in an animal group previously thought to lay eggs exclusively has been discovered by an international team of scientists, including a palaeontologist from the University of Bristol. The remarkable 250 million-year-old fossil from China shows an embryo inside the mother.