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Results 21 - 40 of 54.


Environment - Earth Sciences - 02.10.2017
Birmingham raises ceiling on diversity and inclusion with Marks & Spencer
Researchers have warned of an 'urgent worldwide need' to address a broad spectrum of cascading impacts of glacier mass loss on downstream systems. In their paper, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the authors synthesised currently available evidence and documented the profound impact on freshwater and near-shore marine systems.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 27.09.2017
The volatile processes that shaped Earth
Based on observations of newly-forming stars, scientists know that the solar system began as a disc of dust and gas surrounding the centrally-growing sun. The gas condensed to solids which accumulated into larger rocky bodies like asteroids and mini-planets. Over a period of 100 million years these mini-planets collided with one another and gradually accumulated into the planets we see today, including the Earth.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 15.09.2017
’Mysterious’ ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else? Recent findings suggest animals had evolved several million years before the 'Cambrian Explosion' that has been the focus of attention for studies into animal evolution for so long.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 14.09.2017
’Mysterious’ ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else? A new study by researchers at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, and the British Geological Survey provides strong proof that Dickinsonia was an animal, confirming recent findings suggesting that animals evolved millions of years before the so-called Cambrian Explosion of animal life.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 12.09.2017
Tectonic plates ’weaker than previously thought’, say scientists
Experiments carried out at Oxford University have revealed that tectonic plates are weaker than previously thought. The finding explains an ambiguity in lab work that led scientists to believe these rocks were much stronger than they appeared to be in the natural world. This new knowledge will help us understand how tectonic plates can break to form new boundaries.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.09.2017
New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war
New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war A new study, published today in the journal Political Geography , shows that there is no sound evidence that global climate change was a factor in causing the Syrian civil war. Claims that a major drought caused by anthropogenic climate change was a key factor in starting the Syrian civil war have gained considerable traction since 2015 and have become an accepted narrative in the press, most recently repeated by former US vice president Al Gore in relation to Brexit.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.08.2017
Conservation hindered by geographical mismatches between capacity and need
New research suggests that geographical mismatches between conservation needs and expertise may hinder global conservation goals. Experts from the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and other institutions have examined geographical patterns within the leadership of the conservation science publishing system focusing on the affiliation of journal editors, who serve as gatekeepers and leaders in the scientific process.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 29.08.2017
Sense of smell is key factor in bird navigation
How do birds navigate over long distances' This complex question has been the subject of debate and controversy among scientists for decades, with Earth's magnetic field and the bird's own sense of smell among the factors said to play a part. Now, researchers from the universities of Oxford, Barcelona and Pisa have shown in a new experiment that olfaction - or sense of smell - is almost certainly a key factor in long-distance oceanic navigation, eliminating previous misgivings about this hypothesis.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 15.08.2017
Study identifies dinosaur ’missing link’ | University of Cambridge
A 'Frankenstein's monster' dinosaur may be the missing link between two major dinosaur groups, plugging what was previously a big gap between them. Chilesaurus almost looks like it was stitched together from different animals, which is why it baffled everybody. Matthew Baron A bizarre dinosaur which looked like a raptor but was in fact a vegetarian may be the missing link between plant-eating dinosaurs and theropods, the group that includes carnivores such as Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptor .

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.07.2017
CERN experiment discovers a new, very charming particle
A new study has found a previously undetected potential health risk from the high concentration of small particles found in a boomerang-like return of a volcanic plume. A team of scientists from the Universities of Birmingham, Leeds, Oxford, Cambridge, King's College London, Met Office, Environment Agency of Iceland, and Icelandic Meteorological Office worked in collaboration in the study of the Icelandic Holuhraun lava field eruption.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 30.06.2017
Size not important for fish in the largest mass extinction of all time
Understanding modern biodiversity and extinction threats is important. It is commonly assumed that being large contributes to vulnerability during extinction crises. However, researchers from the University of Bristol and the Chengdu Center of the China Geological Survey, have found that size played no role in the extinction of fish during the largest mass extinction of all time.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 29.06.2017
Tree rings pinpoint eruption of Icelandic volcano to half a century before human settlement
An international group of researchers has dated a large volcanic eruption in Iceland to within a few months. The eruption, which is the oldest volcanic eruption to be precisely dated at high northern latitudes, occurred shortly before the first permanent human settlements were established, when parts of the now mostly treeless island were still covered with forest.

Earth Sciences - 28.06.2017
‘Bulges’ in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions
A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions. This could be a new way of predicting volcanic eruptions. Clare Donaldson Using a technique called 'seismic noise interferometry' combined with geophysical measurements, the researchers measured the energy moving through a volcano.

Earth Sciences - Health - 12.06.2017
Icelandic volcanic â?‘plumerangâ’’ could be bad for your health
An Oxford University collaboration has found previously undetected health risks contained in the boomerang-like return of an Icelandic volcanic plume. The new study, published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, traced the evolution of the plume chemistry from the 2014-2015 Icelandic Holuhraun lava field eruption and found an unreported secondary (older) plume that had significant impact on air quality.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 05.06.2017
Scientists analysing Martian mudstones reveal chemistry of ancient lake in study
Scientists analysing Martian mudstones reveal chemistry of ancient lake in study
Imperial's Professor Sanjeev Gupta talks about the chemistry of rocks on Mars and what they reveal about a lake that has long since dried up. Professor Gupta, from Imperial College London's Department of Earth Science and Engineering , is part of NASA's Curiosity mission. Every day, analyses data on the geology of Mars that is beamed back from the Mars Science Laboratory mission's remote-controlled Curiosity rover.

Earth Sciences - 05.06.2017
Report reveals a rise in the demand for food banks in the UK
Report reveals a rise in the demand for food banks in the UK
New research has found that there are at least 2000 food banks in the UK, a higher number than previously thought. The research is published by the Independent Food Aid Network (Ifan), Chaired by Jon May , Professor at the School of Geography, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). According to the report, a growing number of food banks are giving out emergency food parcels on a weekly basis to people in hardship.

Earth Sciences - 02.06.2017
Magma reservoirs key to volcanic eruptions
New study shows the importance of large reservoirs in creating Earth's most powerful volcanic eruptions and explains why they are so rare Large reservoirs of magma stored deep in the Earth's crust are key to producing some of the Earth's most powerful volcanic eruptions, new research has shown. In a new study, an international team of scientists claim that the most powerful volcanic eruptions, dubbed 'super-eruptions', are triggered by a slow and steady drip feed of magma from large reservoirs deep within the Earth's crust into smaller reservoirs closer to the surface.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 30.05.2017
Early human migration
New study reveals the importance of African groundwater in kick-starting the evolutionary history of humans An international team led by a researcher at Cardiff University believe that the movement of our ancestors across East Africa was shaped by the locations of groundwater springs. In a new study, the team argue that the springs acted as pit stops to allow early humans to survive as they moved across the African landscape.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.05.2017
New approach predicts threats to rainforests
Borneo is an island that has lost a staggering 30 percent of its forest since the 1970s and is among the most biodiverse and threatened on the planet. The study findings, published in Landscape Ecology, will be useful to all forest conservationists, and could help tropical forests around the world, including Borneo.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 05.05.2017
Growth of East Antarctic Ice Sheet was less than previously suggested
Growth of East Antarctic Ice Sheet was less than previously suggested
Scientists have known for over a decade that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been losing mass and contributing to sea level rise. Its eastern neighbour is, however, ten times larger and has the potential to raise global sea level by some 50 metres. Despite its huge size and importance, conflicting results have been published on the recent behaviour of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet.