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Philosophy - 05.12.2017
Migrant deaths are ’vastly under-reported’ according to new report
The majority of migrant deaths are unrecorded, according to a new report which calls for 'significant improvements' to be made in order to capture the true number of deaths which occur during migration worldwide. The report, the second part of Fatal Journeys Volume 3: Improving data on missing migrants from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and co-edited by University of Bristol academic Ann Singleton , comes just days after the US pulled out of the United Nations' global compact on migration.

Philosophy - 18.07.2017
Hearing a sound can alter perception of finger size
Hearing an ascending sound while pulling their own finger can make a person think their finger is longer than it is, finds a new study led by UCL and the Institute of Philosophy, School of Advanced Study, University of London. The study, published in Scientific Reports and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), provides the first evidence that an artificial sound, unrelated to the sound of body movements, can alter how a person perceives their own body when the sound is arbitrarily paired with a bodily action.

Economics / Business - Philosophy - 14.06.2017
‚?'Purposeful leaders‚'' are winning hearts and minds in workplaces, study finds
‚?‘Purposeful leaders‚’’ are winning hearts and minds in workplaces, study finds
‚?'Purposeful leaders‚'' are winning hearts and minds in workplaces, study finds People are happier and more productive when their leaders show strong morals, a clear vision and commitment to stakeholders, a new study has found. The growing importance of what is being described as 'purposeful leadership' for the modern workplace is outlined today in a new report for the CIPD , the professional body for HR and people development.

Health - Philosophy - 05.04.2017
Public attitudes towards end-of-life care in progressive neurological illness are conflicted, study reveals
Public attitudes towards end-of-life care in progressive neurological illness are conflicted, study reveals
Public attitudes in UK and USA reveal support both for life-sustaining interventions and for measures to enable peaceful death in progressive neurological illness such as dementia, according to a survey carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge. Debate surrounding assisted dying goes to the heart of clinical ethical principles Gemma Clarke The study found that one in six people believes that measures must be taken to sustain life at any cost even when a patient is in the final stages of an illness such as dementia.