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Environment - Health - 29.12.2016
Languages still a major barrier to global science, new research finds
Languages still a major barrier to global science, new research finds
Over a third of new conservation science documents published annually are in non-English languages, despite assumption of English as scientific ‘lingua franca'. Researchers find examples of important science missed at international level, and practitioners struggling to access new knowledge, as a result of language barriers.

Health - 29.12.2016
Can paint strokes help identify Alzheimer's?
Can paint strokes help identify Alzheimer’s?
A new University of Liverpool study published in ‘Neuropsychology!' shows that it may be possible to detect neurodegenerative disorders in artists before they are diagnosed. Psychologist Dr Alex Forsythe from the University's School of Psychology and her team, working with Dr Tamsin Williams of Tees, Esk, and Wear Valleys NHS Trust, Vale of York and Maynooth University, Ireland, examined 2092 paintings from the careers of seven famous artists who experienced both normal ageing and neurodegenerative disorders.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2016
Study named as People’s Choice for Science magazine’s ‘Breakthrough of the Year 2016’
Cambridge research that will enable scientists to grow and study embryos in the lab for almost two weeks has been named as the People's Choice for Science magazine's ‘Breakthrough of the Year 2016' It's a natural human instinct to be curious about where we come from, but until now, technical hurdles have meant there's been a huge gap in our understanding of how embryos develop Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz The work, led by Professor Magdalena Ze

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2016
New disease could signal hope for sufferers of brain ageing conditions
New disease could signal hope for sufferers of brain ageing conditions
New disease could signal hope for sufferers of brain ageing conditions A new genetic disease which results in neurodegeneration has been discovered by experts at the University of Sussex. In a study published today, Wednesday 21 December, in the top scientific journal Nature, the team from the University of Sussex's Genome Damage and Stability Centre (GDSC) reveal they have discovered the disease, ataxia oculomotor apraxia type XRCC1 , which is caused by a genetic mutation that disrupts the repair of our DNA.

Administration - Health - 21.12.2016
NHS hospitals that outsource cleaning ‘linked with higher rates of MRSA’
New research shows that NHS hospitals that employ private cleaners are associated with a higher incidence of MRSA, a ‘superbug' that causes life-threatening infection and has previously been linked with a lack of cleanliness. The superbug is becoming increasingly difficult to treat. As from 2005, trusts have been required to regularly report incidents of MRSA, which has enabled researchers to produce empirical evidence for the first time that compares the rates of infection in hospitals that outsource cleaning with those using in-house cleaners.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2016
Gene discovery helps children with movement disorder walk again
Gene discovery helps children with movement disorder walk again
UCL researchers have discovered a new genetic cause for dystonia, a movement disorder, enabling treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation which has been so successful that children have been able to walk again. The team of researchers from UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University of Cambridge and the NIHR Rare Disease Bioresource have identified mutations in a gene, called KMT2B, in 28 patients with dystonia.  In most cases, the patients - many of whom were young children who were thought to have a diagnosis of cerebral palsy - were unable to walk.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.12.2016
Alzheimer’s Advance: study in mice show new drugs that restore memory loss and prolong life
An international team of scientists has announced a new advance in the fight against Alzheimer's disease by identifying a new drug target for not only improving symptoms of brain degeneration - but also to extend the life-span of the terminally ill mice. The four-year study by Medical Research Council (MRC) scientists based at the MRC Toxicology Unit at the University of Leicester is published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2016
Patients show considerable improvements after treatment for newly-defined movement disorder
Patients show considerable improvements after treatment for newly-defined movement disorder
DNA sequencing has defined a new genetic disorder that affects movement, enabling patients with dystonia - a disabling condition that affects voluntary movement - to be targeted for treatment that brings remarkable improvements, including restoring independent walking.

Health - 19.12.2016
Neglect and abuse in childhood could have long-term economic consequences
Neglect and abuse in childhood could have long-term economic consequences
People who suffer neglect and abuse in childhood are much more likely to have time off work due to long-term sickness and less likely to own their own homes when they reach middle age than their peers, according to new research undertaken at UCL. The study, which is published in U.S. journal Pediatrics and undertaken as part of the Public Health Research Consortium, showed that the potential socioeconomic impact of child neglect and abuse may persist for decades.

Health - Environment - 19.12.2016
El Niño fuelled Zika outbreak, new study suggests
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have shown that a change in weather patterns, brought on by the 'Godzilla' El Niño of 2015, fuelled the Zika outbreak in South America. The findings were revealed using a new epidemiological model that looked at how climate affects the spread of Zika virus by both of its major vectors, the yellow fever mosquito ( Aedes aegypti ) and the Asian tiger mosquito ( Aedes albopictus ).

Health - Life Sciences - 19.12.2016
Further evidence found for causal links between cannabis and schizophrenia
Further evidence found for causal links between cannabis and schizophrenia
People who have a greater risk of developing schizophrenia are more likely to try cannabis, according to new research, which also found a causal link between trying the drug and an increased risk of the condition. The study from the University of Bristol comes on the back of public health warnings issued earlier this year by scientists who voiced concerns about the increased risk of psychosis for vulnerable people who use the drug.

Health - 16.12.2016
Lowering cholesterol to 'levels of a new-born' cuts heart attack risk
Lowering cholesterol to ’levels of a new-born’ cuts heart attack risk
Reducing our cholesterol levels to those of a new-born baby significantly lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research. Although previous studies have suggested lowering cholesterol levels may be associated with a lower risk of heart attack, recent evidence has questioned whether very low levels are beneficial.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2016
Does omega-3 algal oil improve osteoarthritis in dogs?
Does omega-3 algal oil improve osteoarthritis in dogs?
Owners of dogs showing signs of osteoarthritis are being asked by the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences to take part in the first study of its kind to find out whether an omega-3 oil derived from algae can help dogs with osteoarthritis (OA). The double blind placebo-controlled trial , funded by the Dogs Trust , is led by Dr Jo Murrell and a team of animal health and welfare specialists in the Vet School.

Social Sciences - Health - 13.12.2016
System is failing to prevent deaths following police custody and prison, study suggests
System is failing to prevent deaths following police custody and prison, study suggests
Poor access to health care and confusion over post-detention care may have contributed to more than 400 deaths following police custody and prison detention since 2009, a new report has claimed.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2016
Brain shrinkage in multiple sclerosis associated with leaked protein in blood
Brain shrinkage in multiple sclerosis associated with leaked protein in blood
A leak of a protein called haemoglobin from damaged red blood cells may be associated with brain shrinkage in multiple sclerosis. This is the conclusion of a team from Imperial College London , whose early-stage findings suggest treatments that lower levels of haemoglobin could slow progression of the disease.

Career - Health - 13.12.2016
Registration of human tissue banks could stop millions of samples going to waste
A change in the way human tissue banks are registered should help prevent millions of human tissue samples, that could be used for medical research, from going to waste. All UK human tissue banks will now be expected to register with the new central UK Clinical Research Council (UKCRC) Tissue Directory developed by experts at The University of Nottingham's Advanced Data Analysis Centre (ADAC) in partnership with UCL (University College London).

Social Sciences - Health - 13.12.2016
Television volume can be festive flashpoint for Christmas viewers
For many households, crowding around the television for a family film or to watch the Queen's speech is as much of a Christmas tradition as opening presents and enjoying a turkey dinner. But in homes where one family member has a hearing aid, settling down to watch the box can become a festive flashpoint - leading to arguments about volume and tussles over the TV remote.

Health - Administration - 13.12.2016
Topical cream is potential alternative to surgery for common type of skin cancer, study finds
PA 289/16 A topical skin cream could be used as a viable alternative to surgery for patients with a common type of skin cancer, a study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham found. The research, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology , found that imiquimod had high levels of success when used to treat basal cell carcinoma (BCC) over a period of five years.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2016
New epilepsy gene network identified by scientists
New epilepsy gene network identified by scientists
Scientists have discovered a gene network in the brain associated with epilepsy. The team, led by scientists at Imperial College London , believe the discovery may lead to more treatments for the condition. The study, published in the journal Genome Biology , has revealed an ‘epileptic network' of 320 genes, called M30, that is associated with the condition.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2016
EnzBond launches to make fast, effective enzyme development a reality
EnzBond, a new biotechnology company from Oxford University, has been formed to commercialise in-silico technology, which makes utilising enzymes in drug manufacturing both cost-effective and time-efficient. At present, discovering the right enzymes for production in drug development can prove both prohibitively expensive and time consuming, as identifying the right enzyme is a trial and error process that can see companies go through potentially thousands of enzymes during the search.
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