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Results 61 - 80 of 1052.


Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2016
New diagnostic test invented to detect costly Atlantic salmon disease
Scientists from the University of Glasgow, working with major companies in the aquaculture industry BioMar Ltd and Marine Harvest (Scotland) Ltd, have discovered a ‘simple test' to aid the diagnosis of a significant disease which affects Atlantic salmon which could save millions to the industry.

Health - 01.12.2016
HIV patients showing signs of multidrug resistance in Africa
HIV patients showing signs of multidrug resistance in Africa
Significant numbers of patients whose HIV strains developed resistance to older generation drugs are also resistant to modern drugs, finds a new study led by UCL and funded by Wellcome. The research, co-authored by researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases , studied 712 HIV patients across the world whose HIV was not controlled by antiretrovirals.

Health - Psychology - 30.11.2016
Teenagers could see long-term benefits from new treatments for depression
Teenagers could see long-term benefits from new treatments for depression
More than two-thirds of adolescents who suffer from depression could see long-term benefits from receiving one of three psychological treatments - of which only one is currently recommended on the NHS - according to research published today in The Lancet Psychiatry .

Health - 30.11.2016
Targeting an anti-ageing pathway could reduce impact of major lung condition
Targeting an anti-ageing pathway could reduce impact of major lung condition
Researchers have discovered that chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) may be treated by targeting an anti-ageing pathway. In the UK, almost three million people have COPD, which causes progressive shortness of breath. The condition is primarily caused by long-term smoking, but can also be the result of exposure to other air pollutants and fumes.

Health - 30.11.2016
Benefits of daily aspirin outweigh risk to stomach
Stomach bleeds caused by aspirin are considerably less serious than the spontaneous bleeds that can occur in people not taking the drug, concludes a study led by Cardiff University. Published in the journal Public Library of Science, the extensive study of literature on aspirin reveals that while regular use of the drug increases the risk of stomach bleeds by about a half, there is no valid evidence that any of these bleeds are fatal.

Health - 30.11.2016
Swimming, racquet sports, and aerobics linked to best odds of staving off death
In terms of exercise, swimming, racquet sports, and aerobics seem to be associated with the best odds of staving off death from any cause and from heart disease and stroke, in particular, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine . The health benefits of physical activity are legion, but to try and quantify the impact of different types of sports and exercise on the odds of beating death, the researchers analysed data from 11 nationally representative annual health surveys for England and Scotland, carried out between 1994 and 2008.

Life Sciences - 30.11.2016
Mobbing mongooses get by with a little help from their friends
Mobbing mongooses get by with a little help from their friends
In their notorious battles with snakes, dwarf mongooses are more likely to help attack the enemy if they are closely bonded to the individual raising the alarm, reports new experimental research from scientists at the University of Bristol. Strong bonds, or 'friendships', occur between group members in many species, not just humans.

Life Sciences - 29.11.2016
It's all in the eyes: women and men really do see things differently
It’s all in the eyes: women and men really do see things differently
Women and men look at faces and absorb visual information in different ways, which suggests there is a gender difference in understanding visual cues, according to a team of scientists that included psychologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The researchers used an eye tracking device on almost 500 participants at the Science Museum over a five-week period to monitor and judge how much eye they felt comfortable with while looking at a face on a computer screen.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 29.11.2016
New insights into skin cells could explain why our skin doesn't leak
New insights into skin cells could explain why our skin doesn’t leak
The discovery of the shape and binding capability of epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains a barrier even when it is shedding. The discovery of the shape and binding capability of epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains a barrier even when it is shedding. Our study is also helping us to see how the cells that make up our skin can switch on a mechanism to make a kind of glue, which binds the cells together, ensuring that our skin maintains its integrity.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.11.2016
Alcohol consumption may be regulated by liver-brain pathway
Alcohol consumption may be regulated by liver-brain pathway
A liver hormone called FGF21 may regulate alcohol drinking by acting directly on a receptor in the brain, according to a new study. The new study, by researchers from Imperial College London, King's College London, and UT Southwestern Medical Center, for the first time highlights a liver-brain axis which plays an important role in regulating the consumption of alcohol.

Health - 28.11.2016
World first MRI study sheds light on heart damage during kidney dialysis
Experts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and kidney disease have carried out the first ever scans to study the heart function of kidney patients while they are having dialysis treatment. People with kidney failure need regular dialysis to remove fluid and waste products from their blood, but this process can cause falls in blood pressure and reduced blood flow to the heart.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 28.11.2016
Nottingham leads the world in research using information from primary healthcare
The University of Nottingham is the world-leader in research that uses the analysis of primary healthcare data to drive improvements in primary care, according to a study in the journal BMJ Open. The investigation shows the University produced the largest number of research publications using primary care databases of any institution in the world and is second in the world for citations.

Administration - 28.11.2016
‘English votes for English laws' has not given England a voice in parliament, study finds
‘English votes for English laws’ has not given England a voice in parliament, study finds
English votes for English laws? (EVEL) has not enhanced England's voice in the UK Parliament, according a 12-month study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The study says that ‘greater attention should be paid to the challenge of enhancing England's voice in the UK parliament'.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.11.2016
Liver-brain pathway may regulate alcohol consumption
A liver hormone called ‘FGF21' may regulate alcohol drinking by acting directly on a receptor in the brain, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London, Imperial College London and UT Southwestern Medical Center. For the first time this study highlights a liver-brain axis which plays an important role in regulating the consumption of alcohol, raising the possibility of a new therapeutic pathway that could one day be targeted to reduce the desire for alcohol in problem drinkers.

Health - 28.11.2016
Healthcare professionals lack knowledge on allergic reactions in children
Healthcare professionals lack knowledge on allergic reactions in children
School first aiders, community pharmacists and GP practice nurses overestimate the risk of fatal reaction for children with food allergy. However, the new study also shows some are unable to treat allergic reactions safely. The team behind the research, from Imperial College London, asked 90 people (30 school first aiders, 30 GP practice nurses and 30 community pharmacists) to estimate the likelihood that a child with food allergy will suffer a fatal allergic reaction.

Electroengineering - Computer Science / Telecom - 25.11.2016
Understanding the dynamics of an avalanche
Professor Jim McElwaine of the Department of Earth Sciences talks about new research, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface , which has given some of the first detailed measurements of what takes place inside an avalanche. Tell us a bit about the research? The aim of the project was to understand what processes are taking place inside an avalanche as it travels down a mountain.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 25.11.2016
New target receptor discovered in the fight against obesity
New research highlighted today has discovered the essential role that the receptor FFAR2 plays in the success of fermentable carbohydrates - found in foods such as vegetables, fruit, breads, cereals and pasta - in suppressing appetite and preventing obesity. The team of scientists from King's College London and Imperial College London tested a high-fat diet, containing a fermentable carbohydrate, and a control diet on mice and looked at the effect on food intake of those with and without the FFAR2 receptor.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.11.2016
Artwork inspired by gravitational wave discovery
A large oil painting inspired by the first ever detection of gravitational waves is to be unveiled at Cardiff University. Penelope Cowley, a local artist who specialises in bringing art and science together, will present her work at the University's School of Physics and Astronomy, along with a video showcasing a unique artistic spin on the discovery.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.11.2016
Brain activity predicts the force of your actions
Researchers have found a link between the activity in nerve clusters in the brain and the amount of force generated in a physical action, opening the way for the development of better devices to assist paralysed patients. A clear link between the activity in nerve clusters in the brain and the amount of force generated in a physical action has been demonstrated by Oxford University researchers, opening the way for the development of better devices to assist paralysed patients.

Life Sciences - 23.11.2016
Online training improves understanding of EU pig welfare legislation
Online training improves understanding of EU pig welfare legislation
Animal welfare legislation has been developed for many countries and many species but its impact depends on whether it is followed. New research has found an online training tool can improve participants' understanding of EU tail docking and enrichment legislation, as well as risk factors for tail biting.

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