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Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.11.2013
20% sugary drink tax could reduce obesity numbers by 180,000
The number of obese adults in the UK could be reduced by 180,000 with a 20% tax on sugary drinks, say researchers at the University of Oxford and the University of Reading. The tax could raise over 275 million for the Treasury. The researchers from the British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group at the University of Oxford and the Centre for Food Security at the University of Reading have published their findings in the British Medical Journal .

Administration - Social Sciences - 01.11.2013
Racism link with gun ownership and opposition to gun control in white Americans
01 Nov 2013 A new study has found that higher levels of racism in white Americans is associated with having a gun in the home and greater opposition to gun control policies. The research, published in PLoS One, was led by Dr Kerry O'Brien from The University of Manchester and Monash University and used data from a large representative sample of white US voters.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 01.11.2013
Former missile-tracking telescope helps reveal fate of baby pulsar
Former missile-tracking telescope helps reveal fate of baby pulsar
01 Nov 2013 A radio telescope once used to track ballistic missiles has helped astronomers determine how the magnetic field structure and rotation of the young and rapidly rotating Crab pulsar evolves with time. The Crab pulsar is a neutron star which formed in a massive cosmic explosion seen in both Europe and China in AD 1054 as a bright star in the daytime sky.

Social Sciences - Health - 31.10.2013
Changes in Coroners’ practice may be compromising quality of suicide statistics
Assessment of of fi cial suicide statistics found that between 1990 and 2005, the proportion of researcher-de fi ned suicides given a verdict of suicide by the 12 coroners studied decreased by almost seven per cent, largely because of the increased use of misadventure/accident verdicts for deaths thought, on clinical review, to be suicides.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2013
Patient in ’vegetative state’ not just aware, but paying attention
Research raises possibility of devices in the future to help some patients in a vegetative state interact with the outside world. These findings mean that, in certain cases of individuals who are vegetative, we might be able to [..] improve their level of communication with the outside world Dr Tristan Bekinschtein A patient in a seemingly vegetative state, unable to move or speak, showed signs of attentive awareness that had not been detected before, a new study reveals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 31.10.2013
Gaming technology unravels one of the most complex entities in nature
31 Oct 2013 BBSRC-funded researchers at the University of Manchester's Institute of Biotechnology have used the power of off-the-shelf computer gaming technology to capture previously unobservable atomic movements. The research is helping to chart one of nature's most complex entities known as 'glycomes' – the entire complement of carbohydrates within a cell.

Social Sciences - Administration - 31.10.2013
Language difficulties can last a lifetime
31 Oct 2013 People who suffer from language difficulties as children may continue to suffer from various emotional and behavioural problems as adults, according to new research by The University of Manchester. Childhood language impairment used to be seen as an early years difficulty, with children catching up gradually as they got older.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 31.10.2013
Pinpointing the timing of sudden climate change
Pinpointing the timing of sudden climate change
A team of scientists has shown that during a 1000-year cold period at the end of the Ice Age, known as the Younger Dryas, the climate started to recover in Germany 120 years before Norway. The researchers looked at changes in the sediment of a lake in Germany and compared it to lake sediment records of a Norwegian lake.

Social Sciences - Health - 31.10.2013
How internet affects young people at risk of self-harm or suicide
Oxford researchers have found internet forums provide a support network for socially isolated young people. However, they also conclude that the internet is linked to an increased risk of suicide and self-harm among vulnerable adolescents. Following what is thought to be the biggest review of existing studies into internet use and young people, the researchers suggest that, in future, clinical assessments of such young people should include questions about the online content they have viewed.

Health - 31.10.2013
"alarmingly" low survival of Kenyan women with cervical cancer
31 Oct 2013 Less than 7% of cervical cancer patients in Kenya are getting the optimum treatment needed to eradicate the disease, leading to unnecessary deaths - a study by The University of Manchester scientists reveals. Results from the research, which looked retrospectively at the treatment of women diagnosed with cervical cancer during a two year period, showed 18% of cervical cancer patients in the East African country died within two years of a diagnosis.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 30.10.2013
Orphan elephants less socially clued-up decades later, research reveals
Orphan elephants less socially clued-up decades later, research reveals
Orphan elephants less socially clued-up decades later, research reveals University of Sussex psychologists studying groups of wild African elephants have shown for the first time how human activities such as culling and relocation have a long-term negative impact on deep-rooted communication skills and social understanding in survivors, paralleling what we know about post-traumatic stress in humans.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 30.10.2013
Scientists digitally reconstruct giant steps taken by dinosaurs
Scientists digitally reconstruct giant steps taken by dinosaurs
30 Oct 2013 One of the world's largest dinosaurs has been digitally reconstructed by experts from The University of Manchester allowing it to take its first steps in over 94 million years. The Manchester team, working with scientists in Argentina, were able to laser scan a 40 metre-long skeleton of the vast Cretaceous Argentinosaurus dinosaur.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 30.10.2013
New dark matter detector sends first data from gold mine 1.5km underground
New dark matter detector sends first data from gold mine 1.5km underground
Scientists testing the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment have reported promising scientific and technological results today. They have set up the experiment to identify the nature of dark matter, an invisible substance that physicists believe is all around us, making up most of the matter in the universe, but that barely has any effect on our every-day lives.

Environment - 30.10.2013
Wytham Woods 'shields local plants'
Wytham Woods 'shields local plants'
A recent study has found that forests with dense canopies, including Oxford's Wytham Woods, can partially shield ground-level plants from the local effects of global warming. As the planet warms, the general trend is for species adapted to survive at higher temperatures to thrive at the expense of those better-suited to colder climates.

Health - Chemistry - 30.10.2013
Scientists modify BOTOX for the treatment of pain
Scientists modify BOTOX for the treatment of pain
Modified Botox could be used for the treatment of chronic pain and epilepsy A single injection could relieve pain for months Research could improve the quality of life for people who suffer from chronic pain conditions Scientists have manufactured a new bio-therapeutic molecule that could be used to treat neurological disorders such as chronic pain and epilepsy.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 30.10.2013
Plants use latex to harm and heal
Plants use latex to harm and heal
Plants use natural latex in different ways, to help poison insects or rapidly heal wounds, a new study has found. Scientists from the Universities of Oxford, Sheffield and Freiburg tested latex samples from two different types of plant. They found that Euphorbia plants use slow-drying latex to keep insects in with their noxious sap whereas Ficus plants, such as the weeping fig, use fast-drying latex to seal wounds more quickly.

Physics - 30.10.2013
Manchester leads the Physics charm offensive
Manchester leads the Physics charm offensive
30 Oct 2013 Manchester scientists working at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) have reported the world's most precise measurement of the difference between matter and antimatter – known as CP violation – during the decay of charm particles. The team, which included colleagues from the universities of Oxford and Glasgow, presented their findings at the sixth International Workshop for Charm Physics hosted by The University of Manchester's School of Physics and Astronomy in September and have now submitted their publication .

Health - Life Sciences - 30.10.2013
Researchers identify seven types of breast cancer for more accurate prognosis
A study by researchers in Nottingham has identified seven distinct types of breast cancer, a discovery which could lead to new and improved prognostic tests for patients with the disease. The findings, reported in the British Journal of Cancer , could revolutionise the way in which breast cancer patients are treated by giving clinicians more detailed information about a patient's breast cancer type and helping them create a more personalised treatment plan, avoiding over or under-treatment.

Health - Psychology - 30.10.2013
Improving access to mental health services
A study by researchers from the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester has identified ways to improve how older people and ethnic minority populations access mental health care services. As part of the `Improving Access to Mental Health in Primary Care' programme, researchers sought to identify why two underserved groups, in four areas of Liverpool and Manchester, had not been using mental health services and what measures could be taken to address this.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.10.2013
RNA build-up linked to dementia and motor neuron disease
RNA build-up linked to dementia and motor neuron disease
A new toxic entity associated with genetically inherited forms of dementia and motor neuron disease has been identified by scientists at the UCL Institute of Neurology. The toxin is the result of a genetic mutation that leads to the production of RNA molecules which could be responsible for the diseases.
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